search collections
browse collections

34527 total results

In all collections


Title
Description
Date

=Invitation for the Black Alumni Reception and Dinner held at Safari - World Tapas Bar in Memphis on Friday, June 5, 2009. The design features three photographs of a plate of fried seafood, two Black students, and an exterior view of Safari. The text reads "You're invited to a Tennessee Tech University Black Alumni Reception & Dinner, Friday, June 5, 2009, 5:30-9 p.m., Safari - World Tapas Bar, 414 South Main, Memphis, Tenn., (901) 672-7339 / Details: Join fellow TTU alumni and friends for an exciting evening of fun and food. The evening begins at 5:30 p.m. with a reception, followed by dinner at 6:30 p.m. Meet and visit with President Bob Bell and Vice President Marc Burnett as well as other Tech faculty and staff. Recommended dress is business casual. Directions: For directions and parking information, visit www.ttualumni.org/netcommunity/events. Reservations Required: Make your reservation at www.ttualumni.org/netcommunity/reservations or call (800) 889-8730 or (931) 372-3205 by Wednesday, June 3. The cost for the event is $15 per person."

2009

Flyer for the Minority Affairs and Black Alumni Association's Scholarship Breakfast on Saturday, November 8, 2008, in the Roaden University Center. The design features a solid purple background with white, yellow, and black text. Two pictures of students and two pictures of breakfast food form a border on the bottom of the flyer. The text reads: "TTU Minority Affairs & Black Alumni Scholarship Breakfast / Saturday, November 8th, 9 am to 10 am / Multi-Purpose Room, Roaden University Center / Alumni - $10 / Students - $5 or meal plan / Help Us Raise Money for Our New Scholarship Fund!! / Among the Planned Events: Recognition of First Minority Affairs Distinguished Achiever / Discuss Monetary Goals / Discuss Importance of Scholarships / Methods of Giving / Live Entertainment / Questions or Comments? Please Contact Robert Owens MinorityAffairs@tntech.edu (931) 372-3392."

2008

Photograph of a dinner held by the Black Student Organization and Emmanuel Baptist Church at the Wesley Foundation.

1973-04-29

Photograph of a dinner held by the Black Student Organization and Emmanuel Baptist Church at the Wesley Foundation.

1973-04-29

Photograph of a dinner held by the Black Student Organization and Emmanuel Baptist Church at the Wesley Foundation.

1973-04-29

Photograph of a dinner held by the Black Student Organization and Emmanuel Baptist Church at the Wesley Foundation.

1973-04-29

Photograph of a dinner held by the Black Student Organization and Emmanuel Baptist Church at the Wesley Foundation.

1973-04-29

Photograph of a dinner held by the Black Student Organization and Emmanuel Baptist Church at the Wesley Foundation.

1973-04-29

Photograph of a dinner held by the Black Student Organization and Emmanuel Baptist Church at the Wesley Foundation.

1973-04-29

Photograph of a dinner held by the Black Student Organization at the Wesley Foundation.

1973-04-29

Photographs of the Minority Student Graduation Dinner.

2009-05-08

Photograph of students working the serving line at the Black Student Organization Spaghetti Supper outside of the University Center. Waletha Wasson, Mary Crooms, Debbie Flaggs, Phyllis Perry, and Gladys Pride are working the line. Yvonne Cobbige is being served.

1974-09-19

Photograph of four students seated and eating at the Black Student Organization Spaghetti Supper outside of the University Center.

1974-09-19

Photograph of a students serving a plate of spaghetti and garlic bread at the Black Student Organization Spaghetti Supper outside of the University Center.

1974-09-19

Photograph of Julia Harris, Sandra Hardaway, and Shelba Richardson seated and eating at the Black Student Organization Spaghetti Supper outside of the University Center.

1974-09-19

Photograph of five students seated and eating at two tables during the Black Student Organization Spaghetti Supper.

1974-09-19

Photograph of students and dining staff setting up for the Black Student Organization Spaghetti Supper.

1974-09-19

Photograph of Julia Harris, Sandra Hardaway, and Sheiba Richardson seated and eating at the Black Student Organization Spaghetti Supper outside of the University Center. Yvonne Cobbige is in the process of siting down at a table.

1974-09-19

Photograph of students working the Black Student Organization Spaghetti Supper outside of the University Center.

1974-09-19

Photograph of five students seated and eating at the Black Student Organization Spaghetti Supper outside of the University Center. The serving line is visible in the background.

1974-09-19

Photograph of five students seated and eating at the Black Student Organization Spaghetti Supper. A buffet table is visible in the background.

1974-09-19

Photograph of Tennessee Tech Head Basketball Coach Connie Inman fixing his plate at the Black Student Organization Spaghetti Supper outside of the University Center. The students standing on the other side of the buffet tables include Mary Crooms, Debbie Flaggs, and Phyllis Perry.

1974-09-19

Photograph of Kermit Faulkner playing records at the Black Student Organization Spaghetti Supper.

1974-09-19

Program for the Minority Affairs and Black Alumni Association's Scholarship Breakfast on Saturday, November 8, 2008, in the Roaden University Center. The design features a solid white background with purple and black text.

2008

Program for Black Girls Rock on April 30, 2015. The annual banquet highlighted Women of Worth's programs from the year and recognized students, faculty, staff, and administrators for their work. The program design features a speckled cream and beige background with beige swirls. Black swirls form a border on the bottom and top of the front page. The back of the program features a long quote from Michelle Obama.

2015

Schedule for the Office of Minority Affair's Sneak Peek Week for underrepresented freshmen on August 25- 28, 2009.

2009

Photograph of the attendees of Black Girl Rock posing as a group. The annual banquet highlighted Women of Worth's programs from the year and recognized students, faculty, staff, and administrators for their work.

2015-04-30

Flyer for Black Girls Rock on Tuesday, March 27, 2012, in the Black Cultural Center. The annual banquet highlighted Women of Worth's programs from the year and recognized students, faculty, staff, and administrators for their work. The flyer design features a photograph of a Black woman as the background and black text with a white shadow. The text reads "One Night Only Presents… Black Girls Rock / Tuesday, March 27, 2012 / Located in the BCC (RUC 258) / Time: 7pm / Everyone is invited / Food Will Be Provided."

2012

Clipping from the first page of the February 4, 2020 edition of The Oracle student newspaper.

2000-02-04

Flyer for Black Girls Rock! on February 18, 2013, in the Tech Pride Room. The annual banquet highlighted Women of Worth's programs from the year and recognized students, faculty, staff, and administrators for their work. The text reads: "Minority Affairs Presents: Black Girls Rock! / February 18, 2013 @ 7:00 P.M. / Tech Pride Room / Featuring Dr. Alice Camuti, Etiquette Instructor / Dr. Lanise Rosemond, Speaker / Attire: Formal after 5 Wear / [Design by www.2ccreation.tk]"

2013

Program for the Legacy Gala held on Saturday, April 13, 2019, in the Roaden University Center. The design features a purple geometric background and yellow and white text. The center pages of the program feature a photograph and biography of Hall of Distinguished Achievers Inductee Morris Irby Jr.

2019

TECH ORACLE EAGLES OVERCOME U.T. JUNIORS 26-7 IN WELL PLAYED GAME By Ralph Walker Led by long runs and dashes of Quillen, the famous half-back from Hohenwald, Tech’s Golden Eagles defeated the U.T. Junior Vols of Martin, by a score of 26 to 7 here last Saturday. Quillen did not wait until a critical moment to make a spectacular play but the first time T.P.I. had the ball be slipped around his left end, and with interference furnished by Taylor, Wilson and Puckett crossed the goal line. Adams attempted to kick the goal but failed. Having again kicked off to the Vols in the first period, Adams pushed down near their goal line with a series of bucks. The vols then held the Eagles for downs and Maddox made a nice fifteen yard run around his left end. The pass that was attempted a moment or two later was intercepted by Floyd who carried the ball again into Vol territory. Quillen then again politely crossed around his left and over the goal. But somebody was offside and the goal did not count. In the second quarter Immediately after Hall, West and McCluskey had been sent in to relieve the right side of Tech’s line; Midgett came right in behind them on a twelve yard buck. After several bucks Adams pushed over and Floyd caught a pass which made the score 13 o 0 for Tech. Disliking the way the game was going, Ellington, of the Junior Vols made along punt down into tech territory and later bucked near to the goal line. When they were on the ten yard line, Hall of Tech went through and downed their half for a great loss. The next play the Vols completed a pass, Ellington to Maddox over the goal, Quillen made a hard tackle, knocked the breath out of himself, and was relieved by Lewis. The Juniors kicked the goal, thus leaving the score at the end of the first half 13 to 7. Midgett was the outstanding player in the third quarter. He returned the Vol’s kickoff with a seventy yard punt and later made a forty yard dash with Lewis and Hall blocking. Quillen having resumed his position, followed with a twenty yard run, and then Midgett pushed over the goal. Adams kicked the extra point. In the last period, Quillen again scored after the ball being brought down the field on a series of passes. Smiling Red Binns displayed some excellent runs and gains. Dickerson twisted his ankle and had to leave the field. Throughout the entire game the Vols showed themselves as a hard fighting eleven. They fought faithfully until the final whistle blew. The line-up follows: Eagles Pos. Vols Taylor L.E. Leyman Wilson (Capt.) L.T. Mimms Puckett L.G. Forbes Lehning C. Armentrout (Capt.) Humphreys R.G. Alpkin Jennings R.T. Fydan Carrier R.E. Short Midgett Q. Lyons Quillen L.H Maddox Floyd R.H Frinly Atlams F.B Ellington Sub for Tech were: Dickerson, Medley, Binns, Smith, Hall, Holt, Lewis, Bryan, Halle, Suggs, Lucas, West, McCluskey. RED CROSS DRIVE The national American Red Cross Association has set their goal at seven hundred members for Putnam County. Dr. F.J Walrath has been working in the surrounding communities for membership. The big Gifts Committee will close its drive November 11, and the house to house canvas committee, of which Mrs. Overall is chairman, will carry on the drive to the 12th of November. Mrs. Farr is in charge of the drive on the campus and is also chairman of the Booth Committee enrollment drive. About thirty co-eds will assist her with the booths on Saturday, November 14th. DAIRY HERD IS NOW ON REGISTER OF MERIT TEST The dairy herd at Tech had its second Register of Merit Test Tuesday, October 27, the official tester was Mr. Stewart, of Whiteville, Tenn., a graduate of the University of Tennessee. The cows on test are: Tech’s Rochette Majesty, Majesty Tech May, Tech’s Rochette Lady, Tech’s Princess, Tech’s Majesty Patty and Tech’s Majesty Nancy. The Registry of Merit Test is an official test to determine the average butter fat production of the herd. In 1928-29 this herd helf the United States record and the record has been within a forty mile radius of this institution with the exception of one year, 199980, when Coppini, of California, held the record. MRS. GILREATH SPEAKS AT CHAPEL HOUR Mrs. Gilreat, W.C.T.I. leader, from Charlotte North Carolina addressed the Tech students last week at their regular chapel assembly. She was introduced by the Rev. E.M Steel, pastor of the local Methodist Church, who led the assembly in prayer. Mrs. Gilreat began her address by telling something of her family and of her work. She then launched upon her subject, which concerned the use of strong drink. “You young ladies may have several dresses at home hanging in your closets and you young men may have several suits of clothing. You cannot change your bodies as you can change clothes,” she said. “we see and hear with our brains, the upper part of which are our higher natures,” continued Mrs. gilreat. “Strong drink is a poison. It has disastrous effects upon an individual,” she insisted. Mrs. Gilreath concluded her address by urging young women to be modest, regardless of everything. BUSINESS CLUB MEETS The business Club met Tuesday evening, October 3, Jared Maddux presiding. An interesting and varied program was given. “What the World Expects of a Business Man,” by President Smith. Two readings by Miss Mary virginia Lane, Miss Emily Stanton, and Mr. Cordell Young sang several solos and two duets, being accompanied by Miss Ethel Bolen. After the program cookies and punch were served by Misses Lorraine Maxwell, Polly Tallman, Laura Simmons, Velma Judd and Vera Judd. EAGLES TO MEET MID STATE TEACHERS IN TURKEY DAY CLASSIC Game to be played on Tech Field By J. Harry Puckett Interest is already running high, both in Murfreesboro and in Cookeville, concerning the Thanksgiving game to be played here between Tennessee Tech and the Mid-State Teachers. It is not only going to be a great football, but also Homecoming at Tennessee Tech. several thousand people will be here. Former students of Tech, followers of the teams, friends of the institution, and most of the people of Murfreesboro will be in attendance. There is much rivalry between the two institutions both teams are eager to gain the victory. Coach Faulkenberry has been planning and plotting for this game for a whole year, and will leave nothing undone to defeat the Golden Eagles. Coaches Overall and Smith have been drilling their charges overtime in order to get in the best of condition for that Turkey Day tilt. Everyone who has witnessed a game between Tech and the Teachers know how keen the rivalry is, and this year will be no exception. The results below show the standing between the two teams for all time. Tech holds the edge, having won two. The Teachers have won one game, while the other three have been ties. Here’s hoping that this year’s game is no tie, for it should be decided which is the better. Former Battles Tech 6 1924 Teachers 0 Tech 0 1925 Teachers 0 No Game 1926 No Game Tech 0 1927 Teachers 13 Tech 25 1928 Teachers 12 Tech 13 1929 Teachers 13 Tech 0 1930 Teachers 0 Tech 44 Total Teachers 38 HOME ECONOMICS CLUB HOLDS MEETING The home economics club met last Wednesday November 3, in the Home Economics building with twenty members present. The following program was given. The Alm of Tennessee Tech’s Home economics Club, by Ruth Plumlee. History of the Home Economics Club, by Frances Officer. Misses Johnson and Gordon also gave interesting talks on the Teacher’s Meeting, recently held in Knoxville. T.I.L.L MEMBERS URGED TO BEGIN WORK The constitutions and debate manuals for schools desiring to enter the Tennessee Interscholastic Literary League are now available and may be had by writing Hermaan Pinkerton, District Disector. This is the fourth year Tech has sponsored the T.I.L.L. work. Each year has shown a substantial growth in interest and development. Last year seventy-one students from fifteen high schools participated in the district meet which was held at Tech. we would like to have many more than this at the next meet which will be held in March. All schools are urged to enter the League work at an early date. Some of the schools which seem to be getting the most from the League program are correlating this work with the literary society programs and with the work in the English classes. Tech stands ready to help any high school sponsor the League program. If such help is desired, please write the district director. EAGLES TO PLAY COMMODRE B TEAM By Earl Suggs The Golden Eagles are to play the Commodore B team here Friday, November 13. This will be one of Tech’s hardest games this season. The eagles are in excellent condition for this game, after defeating the strong U.T., Jr., College last Saturday, without any serious injuries. Tech is playing its first game with the Vanderbilt B teams, and it is the intention of every man on the Tech Varsity to play his best football in order to give the Commodres a trimming. The Tech squad is working hard this week, trying to overcome faults of the preceding games. MR. TABOR BEGINS LECTURES SERIES Mr. Dean C. Tabor gave an interesting lecture on the trumpet Tuesday morning in Chapel. This was the first of a series to be given on musical instruments. Mr. Tabor explained the construction of the trumpet, how it is played, and the effects to be obtained. He illustrated these explanations with “Revelle”; then played the following selections, accompanied by Miss Ruth Bullock: “Somewhere a Voice is Calling,” Dreaming Alone in the Twilight,” and Ethelbert Nevins “Mighty Lak a Rose.” SENIORS ENJOY FIRST CLASS BANQUET IN NEW CAFETERIA “Booster Booster Booster, booster, be a booster Yell and holler like you uster Booster, booster, be a booster For dear old T.P.I.,” Last Wednesday evening, the members of the Senior Class were enjoying the first class banquet held in the new Cafeteria while they sang this round, other songs and the “Senior Class Song,” which were written by Dr. Farr, class sponsor, and Conrad Bates and Rema Schubert, members of the class. The purpose of the banquet was just a get together and social occasion. After the members had drunk their cocktails they sang the “Senior Class Song,” to which Bates and Schubert had given the following words: “The days are swiftly passing For the Class of thirty-two Our colors ever flashing We’ll soon bid you adieu; When you years away are stealing And bells of time are pealing; Once more in memory waken Those happy days with you. Chorus I’m dreaming alone in the twilight Dreaming, O Tech, of you; Each long happy year Brought jyos and cheer; And now we are working And never shirking. Join with us now in our singing Tech’s merit to proclaim; Our class will be here With a rousing cheer Ready to praise thy name. Besides songs, the entertainment consisted of a reading, “Girl of my Dreams,” and a humorous encore, by Avonelle Tallman, a talk on class spirit by Conrad Bates, and a talk by Dr. Farr. Those present were: Dr. and Mrs. T.J. Farr, Wille T. Cherry, Anna Montgomery, Mr. and Mrs. Buford Roberts, Conrad Bates, Wilma Reagan, Ross Baker, J.R. Skaggs, Callie Dinwiddie, Pat Cornwall, Rema Schubert, Mary Barbour, Robert Brame, Rolland Anderson, Ruth Plumlee, Selmer Neskaug, Hattie Brown, David Terry, Mildred Bohannon, Hack Wilson, Selma Mitchell, Earl Suggs, Joanna Nichols, Ralph Walker and Avonelle Tallman. BUSINESS PRACTICE CLASS INSPECTS A LOCAL BANK By J.R. skaggs Mr. A.L. Campbell took his class in Office Management and Practice by special arrangements with the bank officials to the First National Bak last Tuesday. The class was conducted through the bank by Mr. Joe Allison, who proved to be both instructive and interesting. The class was shown how the bank did its posting and traced checks and deposit slips through the process of being posted and to their final resting place in the vault. The bank is the proud possessor of up to date posting machines and an excellent accounting system. The new vault was one of the chief spots of interest. It is equipped with an air system to be used if anyone should happen to get locked in the vault. The vault is burglar proof. It has a door that weighs six tons. Every official and employee of the bank did everything possible to make the visit a pleasant one. The members of our class have a deeper insight into the workings of our financial institutions. The class feels deeply indebted to the bank and to Mr. Campbell for the privilege of making this trip. T.L. PASSONS GIVE TALK AT CITY SCHOOL Thomas L. Passons, head of the English Department, delivered a talk on Journalism as a Vocation at assembly at the City school Friday. He explained the organization of a news paper, and the qualifications needed to become a journalist. THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Semi-Monthly Subscription, per year $1.00 Entered as second-class matter at the Post office at Cookeville, Tennessee under the Act of March 3, 1870. STAFF Mildred Bohannon EDITOR Conrad W. Bates Associate editor J. Robert Brame Associate editor Frances Officer Associate Editor Pat Cornwell Features J. Harry Puckett Athletic Editor Mary Barbour Social News Selma Mitchell Alumni News Jared Maddux BUSINESS MANAGER Ruth Plumlee Subscription Manager Wm. Colonel Anderson Circulation Manager Preston Hoge Asst. Cir. Manager Mary Virginia Lane Advertising Manager Thomas L. Passons Faculty Adviser TECH’S HOMECOMING Thanksgiving Day will bring with it Tech’s fourth annual Homecoming. Tech’s students and alumni are looking forward to Homecoming Day with much eagerness and enthusiasm, not only because it is Homecoming Day, but because it is the day Tech plays the Teachers from Murfreesboro. The alumni will be heartily welcomed by every Tech student. Come back and meet old acquaintances and make new ones. Visit your old classrooms and let Tech students show you over the new buildings. And, by all means, do not miss the big dinner in the new cafeteria. WE WONDER When Robert Greenwood will wreck his car? Who started the booster song? Why Sullivan wants a girl that can’t play mumble peg? If Quill Cope really won a ball game Why Elise Cooper had to leave Zoology class? Why Claude West is interested in the Louisville Conservatory of Music? What makes Buford Stroup such a liar? Why the Freshmen are so stubborn? Where Bates got the speech he made at the Senior banquet? How Dowe Hinds can quote statistics so easily? How Kidd has made such a hit with Elizabeth Farr? Why Katherine Montgomery is called “scatter brain?” Why Evelyn Howard is so interested in Vanderbilt? How Jim Pointer can misstate the truth? If Clinard will be true to the girl back home all this year? Who is coming to see Mutt play Thanksgiving? If Red Binns has to rock Marianne? Why Bob Brame is called Heing 57 varieties? How Dave Terry sprained his ankle? If Boot McCutheson is the laziest boy in school? What Minnie Pippin’s real name is—Flossie or Cleo? Why Virginia Thompson is called the walking newspaper? If Jared Maddux is going to get married? What started the depression??? Why Roy Owenby didn’t go to L.M.U.? Where Pat Galberath got that good football team? When the Seniors will have another social? What Burkhalter thought when he scored against Portland? Whose “apple” army invaded east Hall last week? Why Piccolo loves kittens so well? How Joe Rickman acquired the name of “sweetheart”? Why Cordell Hull Smith loves the librarians so well? If Bura Lawson always eats like a monkey? Why Poley doesn’t like to wear knickers? When Mr. Kittrell will get a cradle for his baby and stop using a straight chair? Why Ada Mary says Oh! Oh! So much and so distressful during a football game? T.P.I. SHOULD HAVE AN R.O.T.C. UNIT The question is being discussed as to whether tech should have a unit of reserve officers training corps. It is an undoubted fact that if T.P.I. is to continue growing as rapidly as progress has been made in the past, this will of course be necessary in order to be in line and to maintain the high standards of the other leading colleges of the South. All state universities have developed from some source facilities for a unit of army training for Uncle Sam. Several things are to be taken under consideration in regard to the establishing of a unit here. The biggest question now with everybody is money. Are funds available from the government for this addition? Will the boys who attend Tech spend about forty-five dollars more each year for this purpose? Or in the first place, do the boys want it? What do our officials think of it? Does Tech have, or could it get buildings and drill grounds? The university of Tennessee is now gone to the limit of its capacity and if it continues with the unit more grounds will have to be provided, and it might be possible that if Tech supports a unit, many boys would come here instead of going there, and if that could happen a unit would enlarge our student body. If this R.O.T.C. training is not worth while, then why do all our leading state colleges have it? It has been given the acid test and has won favor with our leading educators, of course as Tech is coming to the front, I see no reason why this matter should not be given serious thought. TECH DEBATES PREPARE TO MEET OPPONENTS The Tech Debating Club has begun work in preparation for the coming season. The programs for the fall quarter will be given over largely to the fundamentals in debating. Such subjects as the following will be discussed. The Requirements for Successful Debating, Determining the Issues, How to Prove the Issues, A Discussion of the Brief, the Forensic, the Refutation, and the Management of Debates. Every member of the Club realizes that much work will have to be done in order to repeat the record which was established last year, by losing only one decision one out of seven engagements. The Club is rather proud of this record since it met teams from four outstanding institutions in the field of debating and further more used eight individuals of four different teams during the season. It is the policy of the Club to allow as many of its members to participate as possible, for by doing so a large number of men are given advantage of the training. The questions for the coming season have not been determined. They will probably be decided upon before the end of the quarter. It is also hoped that the schedule. It is also hoped that the schedule may be completed soon. All students who hope to get into work of the Club should do so at once. Meetings are held on the first and third Wednesday evenings of each month at 6:30 in room 304 of the Administration building. Measuring Daylight Daylight is now measured scientifically in Great Britain. TECH WINS ANOTHER TO MAKE FOUR STRAIGHT VICTORIES OF YEAR By J. Harry Puckett Tennessee Tech continued its winning streak Saturday afternoon, October 31, by defeating 27 to 0, the strong football team of Lincoln Memorial University, of Harrogate, Tennessee. The game was played on the Railsplitter’s home field. L.M.U. had a passing attack that is not to be forgotten, and only for the fine defensive playing of the Golden Eagles the score would not have been as it was. The oval was placed within scoring territory early in the game, and “Ace” Adams, one of the big blonde fullbacks (you know there are two on the squad) carried it over for the first touchdown, but Adams was not satisfied until he place kicked for the extra point, making the score 7-0. Midgett made two of the four touchdowns. Midgett made yard after yard through L.M.U. big line. Our last report was that they had not as yet found out how he made such gains through their wall. Levie Dickerson accounted for the other touchdown with a line plunge. “Ple” Taylor making the extra point. (Pass from Midgett). “Doc” Floyd made the other extra point by a placement kick. The team as a whole did not play the brand of football they are capable of playing. They did not move off fast enough. Maybe it was because the band and cheering section was not there. Jennings, Humphreys, West, Capt. Wilson and Taylor played well in the line. For L.M.U. Hathaway and Greggs played the best game. LITTLE THEATRE CLUB By Jared Maddux   Evidently, in the past history of Tennessee Tech, some form of dramatic club was in existence along with the various other college clubs. That club has become ancient history and has gone the way of the literary societies that were at one time popular. The desire for literary expression has once more asserted itself, and this time it has come forth of a “Little Theatre” Club. Students are taking it; faculty members are urging it. Why not have such a club? The writer has interviewed a number of students, and these students are unanimously in favor of it. The money derived from such an undertaking can be used to buy stage equipment and a portion could be given to the “T” sweater award fund. You will hear more from the “Little Theatre” later. FEEDER OF TENNESSEE CHAMPION DAIRY HERD ENTERES TENN. TECH Newell Thompson, of Watertown, feeder of the Thompson herd of Jerseys, entered T.P.I. October 26. His late arrival was due to an injury received at the State Fair, while he was showing for grand championship, and he was forced to remain in a hospital because of blood poisoning. Mr. Thompson is now the possessor of the two loving cups the T.P.I. herd received in 1929. When he regains his health, he will begin feeding and milking the T.P.I. herd, which is on official test. COMMERCIAL CLUB ELECTS OFFICERS The Commercial Club, composed of students taking courses in business administration, held its first meeting Thursday, October 15. The purpose of the meeting was elect officers for the year. The officers were elected were president, Jared Maddux, Nashville; vice-president, Levie Dickerson, Gallatin; secretary, Laura Simmons, Winchester; treasurer, Ralpha Lucas, Winchester; treasurer, Ralpha Lucas, Winchester; reporter, Caspar Woods, Jamestown; sponsor, Mr. A.L. Campbell, head of the business department. The idea of a basketball tournament among the various clubs was discussed and the club voted to sponsor a team. BUSINESS BOARD NEEDED The Institution Needs a New Bulletin Board The old board, two feet by three feet, has served its day. Likewise have the two society boards. The new board should be at least five feet square, and should be divided into many sections –to take care of the various college activities. The Oracle staff will give a year’s subscription to the student who submits the best plan for the bulletin board, said subscription to be a Christmas gift to his (her) best friend. If ideas are taken from more than one plan in order to make a better board, subscriptions will be given to each person whose plans are used in part. This offer is good any time before December 15, so send in your plans as soon as you complete them. Band Members Entitled to Receive Letters A movement is on now to provide the band members with letters. Such a movie is highly lauditory, for young men and women who spend evening after evening practicing and day after day performing at functions should be entitled to wear a significant badge of merit. Of course a line must be drawn somewhere –between a musician and a wind-jammer (or whatever else he may be called). The band director should certify to the board only the names of players who have made a reputable name for themselves and the institution. Home Economics Club Sponsors Benefit Party The Home Economics club sponsored a benefit bridge party in the Home Economics building Thursday evening. The guests were received by Misses Mildred Bohannon and Mary Ferguson Gaines, president and secretary of the club. Auction bridges was played at twenty-three tables. At the conclusion of the games prizes were awarded to Miss Pauline Gordon, Mrs. Wendell Johnson, F.U. Foster and Sam U. Crawford. Sandwiches and tea were served at the small tables. OFFICERS OF THE UNITED COLLEGE CLASSES PRESIDENT EARL SUGGS Graduate of the Clarksville High School, and member of Senior class. VICE-PRESIDENT JARED MADDUX Graduate of the Coleman-Brown High School of Davidson County, and member of Junior class. TREASURER JOHN BINNS Graduate of the Hume Fogg High School of Nashville, and member of the Sophomore class. SECRETARY SARA ELIZABETH FARR Graduate of the High School at Flora, Mississippi and member of the Freshman class. Social News By MARY BARBOUR Lavelle King was in Nashville last week. Mr. and Mrs. T.L. Passons and children were in Nashville Saturday. Willhelmina Kinzle and Nannie Mae Allen spent last week-end at Miss Allen’s home in Smithville. Tom Muse spent the week-end at his home in Fayetteville. Mr. and Mrs. P.V. Overall were in Nashville Tuesday. Lee Leonard, of Sparta, was here Monday. He was a member of the 1929 graduating class, and is how teaching in the White County High School. Janet Saufley visited her parents at Sunbright recently. Miss Jewel Nolen, of Clarksville, spent the week-end with Miss Elsie Jobe recently. Mrs. P.G. Dibble and Tom Muse were in Nashville Tuesday. Ruth Plumlee spent the week-end at her home in Celina. Mary Alice Clark was the recent guest of her parents in Gainesboro. Mary Joe Meadows of Gainesboro was a guest on the campus last week. Lavenia Bratton spent the week-end at her home in Liberty. Essie Cherry was in Gainesboro last Sunday. Eugene Woods, of Boatland, was here Saturday. Miss Nola Quarles, of Whitleyvile, was the week-end guest of Eugene Gaines. Katharine Montgomery spent Sunday with her parents at Langing. Mildred Bohannon was in Nashville Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. J.B Powell, of Wartburg, were here last Friday. They were accompanied home by her childred, Asa and Justgame. Russell Schubert, of Wortburg, spent last week-end with his sister, Rema. Esther Leeper spent the week-end at her home in Oakdale. Mr. and Mrs. F.U. Foster and Ruth Plumlee were in Murfreesboro Friday to attend the Freshman game. Jimmie Weakley of Nashville, former Tech students, was here last week. Albert Jobe, of Clarksville, spent the week-end with friends of the campus. Elva Cassetty of North Springs, spent the week-end with Miss Rema Schubert. Jessie Lee Cameron was in Nashville recently. Miss Mary Harden and Miss Minno Harden were in Nashville Saturday. Josh brown, of Staunton, Va., was the guest of friends here last week. He is a former student of T.P.I., and now held a government position in Staunton. Dr. and Mrs. T.J. Farr, Jimmie Lee Taylor, Ed Bryan, Melvin Link, and Charles Tripp attended a Baptist convention in Jefferson City last week. J.E. Lane was in Smithville Saturday. He was invited there to speak at a meeting of the Dekalb county teachers. Miss Pauline Gordon and Margaret Johnson, and A.C. Campbell attended the East Tennessee Teacher’s Meeting in Knoxville last week. Mr. and Mrs. James Thompson, of Gallatin, were the guests of their daughter, Ada Mary, Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. J.L. Carrier, of Nashville, were here Saturday. Irene Cude was in Knoxville last Sunday. Clarence Williamson, of Granville, was here Saturday. T.W. Kittrell and Kathleen Kittrell were in Nashville recently. Mr. and Mrs. E.A. Sloan have returned from Troy, where they went to attend the funeral of Mrs. Sloan’s brother, James Presley, who led last Wednesday at his home in Knoxville. Alfred Gill, or Silver Point , was here Saturday. Misses Ruby McKeel and Geneva Johnson of Clinton, spent the week-end with Irene Cude. Frances Brown has recovered from recent illness. Joanna Nichols spent the week-end at her home at Baxter. Miss Lorraine Maxwell spent the week-end with her sister at Peabody College in Nashville Dormitory Girls Give Weiner Roast A group of girls from the dormitory and some invited guests enjoyed a weiner roast at Nichols’ Spring, Thursday evening. The party was chaperoned by Miss Elsie Jobe, and Dr. and Mrs. T.J. Farr. About fifty guests were present. LUCILE LEE ENJOYS TECH ORACL PAGES Miss Lucille Lee, Demonstration agent at Sneedville, Hancock County, has written the editor a letter of appreciation of the Oracle. Lucile was graduated from the third year college in 1927. Since that time she has received the B.S. and M.A. degrees from the University of Tennessee, and has been located at Sneedville for about two years. While at Tech, Lucile was about the most active young woman on the Hill. She engaged in all activities, was voted the most popular young woman, and even at one time was judged worthy to be a member of the Oracle Staff. Her letter addressed to the editor, says in part: “I have just finished reading the last Oracle and am so thrilled over the improvements and the football victories. “I am enjoying my work and am getting along splendidly, but right the minute I wish I were a freshmen at Tennessee Tech, and all the old gang were there wearing the green. “I am scheming to get to attend homecoming. If I do not come, my thoughts will be of Tech, and I will be yelling for the team. “The Oracle is growing better and better. I wish you a successful year as its editor.” Sincerely yours, LUCILE LEE, Class of ‘27 THEO HAMMER SENDS IN HIS SUBSCRIPTION Villanow Georgia October 19, 1931 Editor, Tech Oracle— Will you kindly send the Oracle to me at Villanow, Ga. Possibly the readers of the Oracle would be interested in knowing how this village received its name. villanow was named by a college lad, who upon returning from college, found that the place he called home had expanded into a thriving village of two stores two churches, and a cotton gin. He immediately explained, “She’s a village now” and gave it the name “Villanow” meaning a village now. Villanow is near the heart of the Cherokee nation. Practically all the surrounding places bear Indian names. Many Indian relics are yet to be found in this section and some of the people claim to be relatives to the Cherokees. Recently a monument was unveiled at Calhoun in memory of Sequoyah, the inventor of the Cherokee alphabet. Respectfully yours, THEO HAMMER Prin. West Armuchee High School Alumni Editor Selma Mitchell Who has taken upon herself the role of finding news about all the Tech graduates and former students. She noticed in one dictionary that “alumni” means “a former student,” and the meaning suits her so well that she desires information from all former Tech men and women, however long they may have been on the Hill. Write her a letter, will you? ALUMNI NEWS By Selma Mitchell Bradley Cassetty, 1928 High School graduate, graduated from the law department of Cumberland University, last spring and has received license to practice law in all courts of the state. Bradley was the class poet for the class of ’28. Creeda Farmer, student during 1930-31, is at her home in Pikesville. She is planning to return to the institution soon. Barbara Zumstein, freshman in 1929, is teaching at White Oak, near Oakdale. This is three years of teaching for Barbara at the same place, and she is planning to be here for the spring quarter. Franklin Dyer attended Tech in 1930-31, is now a student of Piedmont College, Demoreat, Ga. He is taking a Commercial course, is head reporter for the school activities, and writes for the Atlanta Journal. Gretchen Boyd, a summer school student of 1920 is teaching in savannah, Ga. Whitney White, High School graduate of 1928, is an instructor at the Portland High School. Mary Della Pointer, B.S., Home Economics, 1930, is teaching in the Algood High School. She received many honors at Tech, Miss Tech in 1930s, assistant editor Oracle 28-29 editor Eagle ’30, and assistant librarian ’27, ’28, ’29, ’30. Ethel Turman, Junior last year, is teaching in the grammar school at Collingwood, Ethel was chosen by students last year for the 1931 May Queen. She will return to Tech for the spring quarter. Mildred Swindell, Sophomore in 1930, is teaching in Davidson county. While she was at Tech she was a member of the basketball team and was captain in 1930. Pete Williamson is teaching at Granville. While at Tech he played on the various athletic teams. He was captain of the boy’s basketball team in 1931. Johannoah Noonan, student at Tech in 1919-1920, is a private secretary in Chicago. Campus Chatter By PAT CORNWELL Quite a bit of fun has been thrown at Coach Scott’s yearlings for being go completely routed by the Teacher’s rats in their encounter a few days ago. Our freshmen were unmercifully lashed to the tune of 46-9. But, we do not want our freshmen unduly criticized, especially our good friend Dave Ensor, alias Windmill, alias Hots, alias Asthma, alias Bobby Dodd. So your humble servant made it a special point to see what my friend Ossie Ensor had to say in defense of himself and the team. Here is his story: ‘we took the field at 2 p.m. and as quick as the ladies heard I was with the team they all flocked there I hope that they might get to see me in action. Coach, wanting to save me for the last half, placed me on the bench to start the game. Now what could I do to help win the game and keep the girls from being disappointed? The game was under way –imagine my embarrassment –a bench warmer in the eyes of the ladies! The teams were battling at a deadlock. When lo and behold –an airplane began circling over the field. Do you know what my teammates did? They forgot about the game and began trying to figure out what kind of bird it was. Before I could get my eyes off the ladies, to our humiliation, our opponents had scored 30 points. At this point coach sent me into the game. I went limpin in, while the ladies cheered. The team still had their thoughts on that bird; after I explained to them what it was, they got down to real football. Then the ladies, darn them, began to yell for me –their hero—so how in the heck could a feller save the game when the ladies were spoiling everything.” So, my gentle readers, that is Poppa Hota Ensor’s alibi for his team, and I believe it, but Hots, I am afraid no one else is absent minded enough to understand our alibi. To the victor belongs the spoils. MANY FACULTY MEMBERS HAD WORLD WAR SERVICE By Frances Officer Thirteen years have passed since the World War, and those years have changed history at Tech in regard to faculty personnel. Thirteen members of the present faculty saw service in that great conflict. Most of these were overseas at the time of the Armistice, and the others were in training, waiting for the orders that were stopped with the cessation of hostilities. In the list below are the names of the faculty members who saw service, their ranks, and their locations at the time of the Armistices: Q.M. Smith, Ensign, U.S. Navy, New York. D.R. Bartoo, Private, 3rd Aviation Instruction Center, Tours, France. J.E. Conry, Acting Flight Acting Flight Commission, Royal Flying Corps, Cambrai, Belgium. A.L. Campbell, Private, Infrantry, Training Detachment at University of South Carolina, Columbia, S.C. Ferris U. Foster, Sergeant, 5th Rgt. U.S. Marines, Hospitals No. 68 and No. 123, Mars Sun, Allies. R.O. Hutchinson, Sgt. 1st class, Meteorological Division of Signal Corps, Columbey les Belles, France. P.V. Overall, Sgt. 516th Engineers, St. Sulpice, France. T.L. Passons, Second Lieut, 1st Division near Sedan, France. Herman Pinkerton, Private, 164th Infantry, Bourges France. S.B. Quarles, Sergeant training Detachment Unassigned, Engineering Service, University of Tennessee Knoxville. E.A. Sloan, 1st Lieut, Ordance Dept., 117 Mobile Osdance Repair Shop, 42nd Diviion, Antrouche, France, Near Sedan. P.C. Scott, Sergeat, Officers training school, Langres, Frances; received commission of 2nd Lieut. Just after the Armistice. D.W. Mattson, Private, Field Artillery, Central officers training school camp Zachary Taylor, Ky. Where Japan Leads Japan outranks all other Asiatic countries in the use of commercial fertilizers its soil conditions and density of population requiring intensive cultivation of all available land.

1931-11-11

Group photograph of attendees at the Minority Affairs Awards Luncheon.

2010-04-27

Powered by Preservica
© Copyright 2021