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 TECH ORACLE Volume IX TECH’S TITLE HOPES STRENGTHEN BY WIN FROM TEACHERS Eagles Win 13 to O From Tudors as Midgett Stars BY J. HARRY PUCKETT Those Golden Eagles invaded Memphis last Saturday afternoon and completely destroyed all hope of the West State Teachers College for a third successive Mississippi Valley Conference Championship at the Memorial Field, Tech winning by the score of 13 to 0. Tech outplayed the Teachers in every department and in every quarter. The attack was led by Midgett Quillen and Taylor. Midgett ran the team in great style as well as passing and punting. His log punts kept the game. He flung a long pass to Taylor for the first touchdown. After taking the ball down the field again and placing it in scoring position, “Mutt” Quillen carried it over for the second touchdown. The entire game was played in Tudor’s territory, and only for their strong defensive line the score would have been much larger. Time after time the Teachers line held for downs, forcing the Eagles to punt. Out of the passes tried by Tech, three of them were completed. The Teachers tried nine passes and all were failures. The Eagles defense was all that it could be on forward passes Saturday. Tech made ten first downs, while the Tudors made only two. Tech drew some heavy penalties which kept them from making more first downs. “Mutt” Quillen made several good gains, but had not the field been muddy in places he probably would have shown the spectators some real fancy stepping. Nevertheless, Tech played a great game and won. By this victory the claim for the Mississippi Valley Conference Championship is strong, so strong in fact that some team will have to do real playing to out-class Tennessee Tech. For the Teachers’ Shannon, Miska and Borsa were the best, while the Eagles’ best in the line were Capt. “Moon” Hall and McCluskey. In addition to Midgett and Quillen in the backfield, “Ace” Adams, “Doc” Floyd and Levie Dickerson were bright spots. The line up follows: Tech Pos. Teachers Taylor L.E. Dye Wilson L.T. Porter Humpherys L.G. Borsa Lehning C Miska McCluskey R.G. Magoffin Jennings R.T. Shannon Hall R.E. McCormick Midgett Q. Gullet Quillen L.H. Howell Floyd R.H Bodamer Adams F.B. Albright Score by period: Tech 0 7 0 6 –13 Teachers 0 0 0 0 –0 Scoring touchdowns: Taylor (pass from Midgett), Qyullen. Points after touchdowns: Adams. Substitutions: Tech: Binns, Dickerson, Puckett, Bryant, Holt, Haile, Carrier, Suggs, barlowe, Lucas. Teachers: R. Dodds, J. Dodds, Falls, Lancaster. Officials: Referee: A.J. Connery Umpire: Gill Reese Head Linesman: Elmer Gill. Field Judge: Byron Ellis. CONGRESSMAN DAVIS PAYS TECH A VISIT The honorable Ewing L. Davis, of Tellahoma, visited Tech Wednesday October 14, and gave a short address at the assembly. He congratulated Tech on her new buildings and the students on their educational opportunities. He emphasized the value of scholarship and urged that all strive to attain it. We were glad to have Congressman Davis with us and extend to him a hearty welcome at any time. EAGLES TO MEET U.T. JUNIORS HERE NOV. 7 By Ralph Walker Tech’s Golden Eagles will clash with the U.T. Junior Football team on Martin Tenn., on Tech Field, November 7. The two teams have met only once before. Tech’s undefeated team of 1928 defeated them by a 14 to 13 score. This year the Teacher’s College of Murfreesboro, defeated the Juniors 20 to 0. The Junior team is now in good condition and is coming to Cookeville with the expectation of putting up a hard fight. The Eagles are expecting to beat them by a score which will give Tech dope over Murfreesboro and also put the Eagles first in line for the Mississippi Valley Conference Championship. FRESHMAN TEAM TO PLAY MID-TEACHERS RATS OCTOBER 30 The next game for the freshmen is with the Middle Tennessee State teachers Frosh who were beaten 14 to 13 by the Father Ryan team on October 9. This game will be played at Murfreesboro on Friday, October 30, and the whole Freshman team is determined to win it. TENNIS TOURNAMENT IS IN PROGRESS Drawing Attention on Followers of The Net Game The men’s singles and doubles tennis tournaments got under way Wednesday with a strong list of contenders entered. In the first round of the singles, all of the favorites came through with but on exception, Arrants’ win over Johnson was quite a surprise to tennis followers of the campus. The favorites who have come thru thus far are, Shipley, who is conceded a good chance to win the tournament, and Carrier are finalists, it will be a match that all tennis followers should see. Matches that will be close and hard fought are between Cornwell, who defeated Arrants to reach the semi finals and Shipley, Lehning and Carrier , who are almost certain for semi finalist honors. In the doubles, Carrier and Shipley are favored, but will be hardpushed by such combinations as Wilson and Johnson, Carrier and Lehning, and Hinds and Berry. Either one of these teams might crash thru the winner. FRESHMEN PRESENTED CAPS IN GYMNASIUM What—the caps are here? Well –yes –the freshmen were adorned with green caps in the gymnasium Thursday evening. The President of the Sophomore Class, Mr. Clinard, in a brief talk to the freshmen, issued the following statement: “Freshmen should consider this an honor to wear these green caps, a method to show the love and appreciation for Tech. Later happy thoughts will be brought when glancing at the green cap of the freshmen days.” The roll of the freshman class was called and as a reward –a green cap was issued. THE PUBLICATION OFFICE At last the dream of the Tech Oracle Staff has become a reality. The Oracle now has an office and no corner of Mr. Passons’ office. The Eagle and the Oracle now occupy room 202 in the Administration building, the room formerly used by Miss Harden. Two years ago the Oracle had practically no equipment and no office. Last year a typewriter and a steel desk were acquired. This year the Oracle has added to its equipment an addressograph, a filing cabinet for cuts, eight large chairs, and a mailing raek. HOMECOMING By Joanna Nichols “Aren’t these new buildings great? Why, I was so interested in the dining hall that I hardly noticed what we had for lunch.” And have you seen the new Industrial Arts Building? It’s a dream! Come on; let’s look it over.” This is just a little of what we shall hear on the campus from the former Tech students the next time they come back. It cannot be long –only one short month—until the annual reunion of Tech grads and former students. Their eagerness to see their old classmates will be surpassed by only one thing and that is to see Tech’s Golden Eagles soar once more in the battle against the Teachers. How the students, old and new, enjoy that game! And why not? Isn’t it really the end of a perfect day? We can each do our bit toward making Thanksgiving the greatest Homecoming in the history of T.P.I. Think about it! Talk about it! Make the visitors feel that it’s the same old Tech with a school spirit that is growing as the years roll by. TENNESSEE TECH TO PRESENT THE DE LUXE ARTISTS-SINGERS In Music Memories On Monday evening, November 9, at 8 P.M., the Public Program Committee presents, in the Tech auditorium, the De Luxe Artists-Singers, a Redpath Feature attraction. The program is as follows: A Great Festival Program 1. “Cathedral Memories,” Gems of Sacred Compositions. 2. American Memories, the ballads and heart songs of today and days gone by. 3. “Concert Memories,” Grand opera, light opera and modern melodies. The outstanding singers and artists are: Mark Krakowaki, soprano; Alma King, contralto, Kenneth Morrow, tenor; Dan Leiner, bass; Luigi Papillo, violinist; Magdalen Massmann, pianist. In presenting The De Luxe Artists—Singers, the Redpath Bureau feels it is offering Tennessee Tech an outstanding musical attraction that can only be described in the superlative. It is no exaggeration to say that the voice quality of the De Luxe Artists-Singers is grand Opera quality. In addition, the De Luxe Artists Singers’ voices have youth and freshness and their program is varied. There is a reason for this, Sandor Radanovits, noted vocal teacher and producer who is responsible for The De Luxe Artists Singers, has brought together in this company the outstanding stars of such great success as The Violin Maker of Cremona Company, The Redpath Arts, The Light Opera Mirror Company. Wherever the De Luxe Artists Singers have appeared, they have simply taken their audiences by storm. The following from H.R. Misener, general chairman of the Indiana State Rotary Conference program, which was held in Michigan City in May with more than a thousand Rotarians in attendance is typical. The concert program you provided for our State Rotary Conference was a great surprise. Its merit far exceeded our fondest hopes. The audience was thrilled by your DeLuxe Artists. The artists left the audience wishing for more and on every hand I heard their praise sung. Please accept my sincere thanks. I am so well pleased that I feel it my duty to heartily commend this charming group of people to anyone who may be interested in the best of concert entertainment. The prices to the public are 25c and 50c. INDUSTRIAL ARTS DEPARTMENT ACQUIRES NEW EQUIPMENT Much new equipment has been purchased for the industrial arts department this year and is being installed in the new Industrial Arts building. Tech will be able to offer industrial courses equal to those offered by any other polytechnic institute. In the materials testing laboratory, located in the basement, a universal testing machine with a capacity of 100,000 pounds and eight speeds will be installed in a concrete base. The machine may be used for either tension or compression tests. Other machines in the materials testing laboratory include a transverse hydraulic tester with a capacity of 10,000 pounds, used for compression tests on steel; a hand operated tester with a capacity of 10,000 pounds, used for testing wooden beams; a Brinell hardness testing machine; and a machine for testing the tension of concrete. Other equipment includes a pit for storing concrete underwater, a drying oven, sleves, and other minor equipment. For the steam laboratory there has been purchased a 9”x10” reciprocating engine which will develop 20 horse people and will run at a speed of one hundred fifty revolutions per minute; a condenser; and two tanks to recover the steam used in running the engine. The new equipment in the electrical laboratory includes one 5 Kva AC –3 H.P., DC instructional unit which may be operated under any one of three conditions: (1) with a standard rotor and DC external excitation; (2) with a squirrel cage rotor; (3) or with a slip ring rotor. One four panel switch board will control all the current entering the laboratory and two portable switch boards will be used in operating the various machines in the laboratory. Other equipment includes a 5 KW synchronos converter, one 7 ½ H.P. DC motor, one 3 H.P. DC motor, one 5Kva AC motor, one 3 H.P. DC motor, one 3 H.P. induction motor, nine large transformers, three small transformers, four capacitors, a drum controller and a number of resistances and starting boxes. In the blue-print laboratory is a new blueprint machine with an are light. The machine is electrically operated and greatly facilitates the making of blue prints. Practically all this equipment will be installed by the first of the year and courses involving its use will be offered for the winter quarter. GOLDEN EAGLES MEET L.M.U. RAILSPLITTERS AT HARROGATE The strong Tennessee Tech team will make their final football trip of the season this weekend when they journey to East Tennessee to play Linacoin Memorial University at Harrogate, October 31. A hard game is expected with T.M.U., as they are going to try to avenge the defeat handed to them last year. The score was 57 to 0. Railsplitters are much stronger this year than last. At this game is to be the big event of their Home-Coming Day they will be playing inspired football. The Golden Eagles are in good condition after defeating West Tennessee Teachers last Saturday. The team is being put through some strenuous workouts this week in preparation for the game. Although this game has no direct influence on the conference championship, it is well worth winning, and the team is determined to bring back another victory to make it four straight this season. Coaches Overall and Smith will take about 24 players on this trip. Took Artist’s Name A certain shade of red hair is called Titian because of the famous artist Titian often pained women with dark red-gold hair. THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute Published Semi-Monthly Subscription, per year $1.00 Entered as second class matter at the Post Office at Cookeville, Tennessee, under the Act of March 3, 1879. STAFF Mildred Bohannon Editor Conrad W. Bates Associate Editor J. Roberts Brame Associate Editor Frances Officer Associate Editor Pat Cornwell Features J. Harry Puckett Athletic Editor Mary Barbour Social News Selma Mitchell Alumni News Jared Maddux BUSINESS MANAGER Ruth Plumlee Subscription Manager Wm. Colonel Anderson Circulation Manager Preston Hoge Asst. Cir. Manager Mary Virginia Lane Advertising Manager Thomas L. Passons Faculty Adviser T.P.I. RAH! RAH! We are glad to note that Tech’s cheering column is much better this year than ever before and we are glad that visitors have observed that too. The Old Tech Spirit much keep pace with progress in other fields. Under the efficient leadership of Clark, Thompson, Henry, and Muse the pep meetings have done much to revive the Tech Spirit in the old students and to instill it into the Freshmen. The new yells we have learned this year are especially good and add pep to the pepprest. Sure, tech is judged by the Tech Spirit, and the Tech Spirit dwells in you and some four hundred fifty other students. Be at all the games and do your part to help inspire those boys on the field to carry the pigskin through to victory the rest of the season as they have done on all the games we have been there to back them up in. don’t miss a single home game and be sure you get in the cheering column and Rah! Rah! For Tech’s team. EXCHANGES The ORACLE has many exchanges on its list. First, it has for a long time been exchanging with every college paper in Tennessee, even if many of those papers will not reciprocate. Then many high school papers are received, and our paper goes in exchange. After that, many high schools are on the list, even if the schools do not have papers to send the ORACLE. We ask the officials of these schools to place the TECH ORACLE in the library or reading room, so that all students may have access to it. In addition to schools, the paper exchanges with about fifteen county papers –bordering on near Putnam County. All these county papers are placed in the Tech library for the benefit for the students. The ORACLE is now being sent to the greatest technical institutions, with the desire of exchanging for their papers. Before the quarter is over, the staff hopes to be receiving papers from all sections of the country –only technical publications, however, for our paper must stay in its special field. MORE ABOUT R.O.T.C. The author of the article in the last issue of the Oracle about an R.O.T.C. unit here has aroused much interest among the majority of T.P.I. boys. The writer is no more versed on the subject than the first; however, he believes that Tech ought to have a unit. There have been several discussions held considering the project. Many boys are eager to have such training. Why not let us talk this over in a big fashion and put up a plea for it? The mere mention of uniforms sends a thrill through every boy. Such training puts mettle in a young fellow and teaches him manly habits. What are we doing to do? Let’s have some action. WHO HAS THAT CATALOG? In the first issue this year, the staff asked for a 1917-18 T.P.I. catalog, if one is in existence. The fourteen other catalogs are waiting for the 1917-18 one to come it, so that all can be bound. Will some one come to the rescue of the Staff? We shall be glad to give a year’s subscription for this one catalog. WE WONDER Who is leading Piper or Guy Boyd? Where Joanna Nichols found her glove? Why Ada Mary Thompson is always tickled? If Dr. Bartoo could teach two classes at once? Who gave Virris D. Williams the black eye? Why Tam Arrants is called the barefooted freshman? If Beale Street is still the same old place? If Emerald Dicus is a real he man? What has become of the faculty’s volley ball team? Why Quill Cope doesn’t get a job in the office? If Hack Wilson has quit telling tales about Pikeville because White Swafford is not here to swear to them? Wilen Coach Faulkenberry will honor us with another visit? If Virginia Taylor was ever quiet? Why Chambers went home? If Albert Qualls has found that perfect woman? If Adcock has found Mr. Foster’s office? How the Freshmen like the green caps? If Willieford has learned to drive mules while in college? If Jimmie Lee Taylor has lost his dignity with the Freshmen? What Roberta Speck would look like without McReynolds? Who convinced the stork that Tech was a good school? If Mrs. Dibble is still feeding beans? If John Gill was dropped on the head when he was a baby? Why Margaret Boyd is so hateful? If Coach Smith will sleep with Coach Overall now? If the Amos ‘n Andy club has found Honey Bunny Boo yet? Why caps were adopted for the Freshman girls? LIBRARY ADDS NEW READING ROOM For a number of years past T.P.I. has had no regular room for the magazines, newspapers, and bound volumes or publications. Of course, there have been several racks of magazines and newspapers in the main library, but this quarter, on account of the increase in the enrollment, something had to be done in regard to having more room. A decision was finally reached. The thing to do was to have a room especially for the magazines and newspapers. A reading room has therefore been opened on the North side of the Administration building, on the second floor, just across the fall from the library. GOD IS ALL We sit beside the restless sea And watch the waters rise and fall, See the dancing shimmering wave, Nor realize God is in it all. We hear the distant thunder’s echo As it rolls from crag and wall, See the lightning fiercely flashing And forget God is in it all. We gather the fragrant flowers. Whose beauties our hearts enthrall; We pluck the loveliest rose, Nor know God gave them all. We grasp for ourselves a soul And hear a sweet low call; We hear, we heed, obey the voice, And know that God is all. Conrad W. Bates, ’32. DEAN SMITH PLAYS BIG THANKSGIVING GAME A few days ago a reporter of the Oracle dropped in to see the venerable Dean of Tech –venerable with age concerning the life history of the institution not that of which Father Time has control. The object of the visit was to have Dean Smith relate a story which he told in chapel last fall, and which has not been heard by most of the Oracle readers. The story of the big Thanksgiving game is told as Austin W. Smith alone can tell it –so here it is: “The big Thanksgiving game was called strictly at 2 o’clock, but the right end was sick and there was no available substitute. So it happened on this wise: the society to which I belonged in that high school (Dechard) had exactly twelve male members; it had, however, rallied a fairly decent football squad, which had scheduled this Big Thanksgiving game with the other society. The student body and the whole country side had become all excited over the coming big event. “I had never seen a football, much less played the game; yet I would have to play, or wreck the entire event. Suffice it to say –I played. “I arrived on the field dressed in a stiff shirt, collar, and tie, and my brown eyes than to play ball. It was not, however, far out of keeping with the dress of the other members of the teams, as football toggery had not at that time been invented (remember that this game I am relating occurred a decade or two ago), or at least the patent was being held up in the Patent Office in Washington office. All players were dressed in citizen’s clothes of many cuts and fashion plates. “Only a few years ago did I learn just what position I played on that Thanksgiving Day. The sum and substance of all the instructions and directions with which I had entered that game was just this –run when the other players run. I had received exactly one minute’s coaching, and no practice at all, to try out what I learned int hat minute. But just when to begin running puzzled me! Some fellow placed me in position, and another began calling out numbers –45, 15, 73, 91 (it did not seem to me that he had ever learned to count a hundred consecutively), and long before he reached the hundred I thought he was counting, I was standing straight up on my head. I changed ends to gain natural position and looked around to see whether those two brown eyes had discovered what a predicament I had been in (and here I wish to remark that in self defense since that day I have been a consistent wearer of suspenders), and then I followed up the team, taking my position as before. “Chicken Miller, a low, heavy-set fellow, was again looking me squarely in the face gleefully. While I was moon-gazing over the crowd to see what those two brown eyes thought of their hero, I faintly heard a series of numbers called, and before I could follow my minute’s instructions –to run when the others run –that impolite Chicken Miller had again tackled me terrifically –which made me in the close proximity of being half angry. I could not figure out why Chicken Miller, a good friend of minute, should treat me like that, unless he, too, was in love with the same two brown eyes, and was trying to show out before them. Surely his hitting me twice was only an accident. After the next down, however, I began to get my Irish aroused. I was sure that Chicken was taking advantage of me for some unknown reason. But the worm was beginning to turn. The numbers were called the fourth time, and I was crouched like a lion before it springs upon its prey. I was totally unaware now of brown eyes and Sunday pants. Zip! I hit him and this time the dirt was in Chicken’s eyes. The referee stepped five yards toward our goal. Some fellow tapped me on the shoulder and muttered: Smith, h--, you were off side in that play!” yes, I replied, and Chicken Miller was off on his head after the play too, and if he doesn’t quit doing me like that I am doing off to the side of a stick. “After that play, I hit him as hard as he hit me, even if I did not know what is was all about. Fortunately for me, we were playing in an old Orchard and I could at times get a tree between us. But the trees were not always beneficial, as one player was lapped around one and received three broken ribs. “When the final whistle blew, the score stood 7 to 0 for me and the two brown eyes.” FACULTY NEWS By Frances Officer The members of the T.P.I. faculty reside at the following places: Niles H. Barnard, B.S.M.S., M.E., Engineering, 125 First street. D.R. Bartoo, B.S., M.S., Ph. D., Biology East Broad, S.C. Phone 205-W. A.L. Campbell, A.B., M.A., Physics, Third Street, S.C. Phone 329. J.E. Conry, B.S., B.A., Agriculture, 1001 Dixie Avenue. A.W. Dicus, B.S., A.B., M.A., Physics, Third Street, S.C. Phone 329. T.J. Farr, A.B., M.A., Ph. D., English, 211 Cherry Street, S.C. Phone 261. Pauline Gordon, A.B., M.S., Home Economics, 708 Dixie Avenue, S.C. Phone 99. Mary Harden, B.A., M.A., Foreign Languages, South Hall. J.M. Hatfield, B.S., English, Fisk Road, S.C. Phone 3-18-G. J.M Henderson, A.B., Ph. D., Mathematics, 1426 Dixie Avenue, Home Phone R.O. Hutcherson, A.B., Ph. D., Mathematics, 1426 Dixie Avenue, Home Phone 180-G. Elsie Jobe, B.S., M.A., Physical Education, South hall. Margaret E. Johnson, B.S., M.A., Home Economics, 118 Broad Street T.W. Kittrell, B.S., Business Administration, East Hall. J.E. Lane, A.B., M.A., Education, 611 Walnut Street. D.W. Matson, B.S., C.C., Mathematics, 115 East Spring Street Lorraine Maxwell, A.B., Shorthand and Typewriting, 708 Dixie Avenue, S.C. Phone 99 P.V. Overall, B.S., M.S., Agiculture, West Hall. T.L. Passons, B.S., M.A., English, 707 North Walnut. Herman Pinkerton, B.S., M.A., History, 805 Dixie Avenue, S.C. Phone 163. S. B. Quarles, Machine Shop Foreman, Whitney Street. R.W. Rutledge, A.B., M.A., Ph. D., Zoology, Lowe Apartments. J.A. Rickard, B.A., M.D., Ph. D., History, 105 Arnold Avenue. Hallie Ray, B.S., Librarian, Smithville Road, Home Phone 141. P.C. Scott B.S., M.S., Chemistry, 709 Walnut Street, S.C. Phone 158 Q.M. Smith, B.S., M.A., Dean 622 Dixie Avenue S.C. Phone 43 A.W. Smith, B.S., M.A., Dean 622 Dixie Avenue, S.C. Phone 187. Rupert M. Smith B.S., M.A., Industrial Arts, North Jefferson Street, S.C. Phone 199 B. Dean C. Tabor, B.S.M., Music, Lowe Apartments. Frank J. Walrath, B.S., Ph. D., Agriculture, 502 Pearl Street, Home Phone 383, S.C. Phone 295 B. Work of Ancient Jewelers Thousands of places of prehistoric platinum jewelry are antedating Columbus have been discovered in Central American. The ancient jewelry consisted of earrings and other ornaments of extremely delicate design. TENNESSEE TECH DEFEATS BETHEL CLAN BY SCORE OF 39 TO 0 Mutt Quillen Here of the day as the Golden Eagles Completely Outplay Their Opponents By J. Harry Puckett The strong Tennessee Tech team led by “Mutt” Quillen did not have much trouble in routing the Bethel, Ry., elan Saturday afternoon, October 17, on the Tech Field. The Golden Eagles completely outplayed Bethel from the very start to the finish, Mutt Quillen leading the attack. Int eh first few minutes of the game Quillen skirted around left end for 80 yards and the first touchdown. There was interference on this play and plenty of it, but Quillen displayed his skill in following it. The try for extra point failed. Ace Adams scored the next touchdown with a ten yard drive through the line. The Bethel team was unable to stop Adams on his line plunges. He was always good for a few yards. After carrying the ball down the field again within scoring territory, Quillen made ten yards around right end for the third touchdown in the first quarter. Midgett punted out of bounds on the two yard line, and Bethel, in attempting to punt from this position, stepped back on the safety zone thus donating a safety. But it was in the fourth period that the Eagles broken loose and made three touchdowns in a very short time. A fresh team, by the way, the first team, was sent in at the beginning of the final quarter. Mutt Quillen returned a punt for 70 yards for one of the touchdowns. Doc Floyd deserves much credit for his blocking and tackling. It was as good as any coach could call for. Wink Midgett made some nice gains. But his main duty is to run the team, punt, and pass the pigskin. Bethels’ passing attack caused Tech lots of worry, but they never got within scoring territory. Hoerth made a few short gains through the line. Winsell and Young also played well in the backfield. In Bethe’s line Pate and Lamb stood out. In tech’s line Chop Mup Jennings, Hack Wilson, McCluskey and Hall were the stars. The line-up: Tech Pos. Bethel Taylor L.E. Wellcott Wilson L.T. Bresher Humphreys L.G. Lamb Lehning C. Pate McCluskey R.G. Parin Jennings R.T. Shoulders Hall R.E. Russell Midgett Q. Young Floyd R.H. Wincell Quillen L.H. Blackburn Adams F.B. Hoerth FRESHMEN TEAM HELD 7 TO 7 TIE BY FATHER RYAN HIGH A very much improved Frosh eleven took the field against the strong Father Ryan team on Thursday, October 15, determined to show the Nashville football fans that any team from T.P.I. must be taken seriously. Before the game, the Ryan aggregation were heavy favorites, having won their last twelves games, but in the closing minutes their supporters were pleading for seven points to tie the fighting Greenies from Cookeville. The first half was scoreless, although the Frosh line outcharged the Ryan forwards at times, and Stroup, right end on the Freshman team, consistently outkicked the Ryan punter. Rud Courley, who has been kept out of practice most of the season with an injured foot, went into the game at the half and contributed two good runs, the second one scoring a touchdown. Piper converted the extra point with a plunge through the line, and the T.P.I. Freshmen were ahead 7 to 0, at the end of the third quarter. A well executed forward pass put the ball on Tech’s ten yard line in the last minute of play; and from there, Lawrence, Ryan’s fast and shifty quarterback, carried it around his left end to score, repeating the play for the extra point. The whole Freshman line played better than it has all season, stopping Ryan’s fine running attack until the last few plays of the game and outcharging the Ryan forwards for three quarters, Captain Burkbatter, at the center, backed up the line on defense and was one of the outstanding tacklers of the game. Piper was always good for several yards on his plunges, while Smith showed himself to be a good blocking back. Jellicorse ran the team nicely at quarterback, was good at blocking and helped to keep up the fighting spirit of the team throughout the game. The lineups: Right end, Strong, Right tackle, Crosslyn, Right guard, Slatton, Center, Burkhalter, Left guard, Hauskins, left tackle, Caruthers, Left end, Kidd. Quarter Jellicorse. Left half, Rickman, Right half, Smith, Full back, Piper. Substitutions: Stone, Chasteen Courley West. The following players are fighting for places in the Frosh line up and many against the Teachers; Wells, tackle; Ensor, right half; Scott, left hair; Leming, full back; Dryden, guard; Fisher, left half; Wood end, Lawrence, guard; Converse, guard; Roper, end; Mason, tackle. RECEIVES PH. D DEGREE DR. T.J. FARR Dr. T.J. Farr is the latest member of the faculty to receive the coveted degree Ph. D. the honor was conferred this summer by the University of Colorado. Dr. Farr’s teaching experience has been principal of a high school, professor of education in Mississippi College, head of the English department in Clarke Memorial College, assistant in Education in the University of Colorado, and professor English since 1929 at Tennessee Tech. President Smith spoke of the future before the technically trained man. Mr. Dicus gave a series of interesting demonstration. After the business meeting the crowd went to the physics laboratory where cider and doughnuts were served. The faculty visitors present were: President Smith, Mr. Henderson, Mr. Barnard, Mr. Dicus, Mr. Sloan, Mr. Foster, Mr. Hatfield, Mr. Mattson, Mr. Quarles, Dr. Hutchinson and Dr. Farr. FRESHMAN PICTURES By A Sophomore When walking along the campus last Monday the old students remarked, “I wonder who all these visitors are.” After deep study we decided it must be the freshmen all dressed up in their Sunday clothes, and the reason—Oh, Yes, Mr. Harding was carrying a little case into Mr. Tabor’s office. It was the day for the Freshmen to have their pictures taken. Of course the Freshmen did want to look their best. The worst part about –they were seen all dressed up the next day –and the Upper Classmen thought sure that were going to wear their Sunday clothes out and then –What would they do? After inquiring the cause we found out that some of them were unfortunate enough to break the camera, and they were only having their pictures made again. We noticed the ones who were little better anyway we know that dressed up the second day looked at the camera is still working now. Social News By MARY BARBOUR Tom Wheel, of Jamestown, former T.P.I. student was here last week. Lucile McCormick is confined to her room with rheumatism. Aline Young has returned from a visited with her parents at Celina. Miss Elsie Jobe, Cecil Jobe and Bill Company spent the last weekend in Clarksville. Robbie Heffin visited her parents at Lancaster recently. Miss Lorraine Maxwell was in Chattanooga last Saturday. Robert Clark Walker, of Wartrace, Spent several days here last week. Woodrow Piper spent the weekend at Carthage. Mary Barbour was in Murfreesboro Sunday. Pruitt Medley spent the week end at his home in Nashville. Mr. and Mrs. Esta Rogers and Ivan Rogers of Farmersburg, Ind., visited their son, Lester, and Mr. and Mrs. W. Dicus over the weekend. Mary Alice Clark spent the week-end with her parents, Dr. and Mrs. F.B. Clark at Gainesboro. Frances Officer and Helen Qualls spent the week end at Livingston. Mr. and Mrs. Wendell Jennings, and Thomas and Joyce Jennings of Farmersburg, Ind, were guests of Paul Jennings and Mr. and Mrs. A.W. Dicus recently. Mr. and Mrs. F.U. Foster, Mary Ferguson Gaines, Mary Alice Clark and Aline Young went to Tompkinsville, Ky. Sunday. Miss Bond Morton spent last week with Miss Hazel Thompson, Miss Morton’s mother is a former matron of the girl’s dormitory here. Mary Ferguson Galues and Eugene Gaines spent the weekend here with Mrs. Johnson. He was a student here last year. Kelly Evans, of Dechard, was here for the Tech Bethel game. Grace Moody was in Murfreesboro Saturday. Will Margaret Betty spent last weekend at Bowling Green, Ky. Mr. and Mrs. E.K. Young, of Celina were guests of their daughter, Aline, Sunday. Joe Gipson and Lee Bilbrey, former T.P.I. students, who are attending the University of Tennessee, were here last weekend. Mr. and Mrs. F.U. Foster were in the Nashville Saturday. Jessile Lee Cameron was in Nashville recently. Miss Pauline Gordon and Miss Hallie Ray visited Muscle Shoals Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Buel Profitt, of Bowling Green, Ky., were the guests of friends here last weekend. Rema Schubert visited relatives at Wartburg recently. Herman Pinkerton, R.M. Smith, Misses Joanna Nichols and Mildred Bohannon Earl Carrier, and Dow Hinds went to Celina last week to judge in a school fair. Mildred Bohannon was in Nashville recently. Mary Virginia Lane and Mary Belle and Martin were in Nashville Saturday. Reception Honors Dr. and Mrs. Bartoo Dr. and Mrs. D.R. Bartoo were the honorees of a reception last Thursday opening when President and Mrs. Q.M Smith entertained in their honor in the Home Economics building of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. The guests were received by President and Mrs. Smith, and Dr. and Mrs. Bartoo in the dining room, which was decorated with autumn leaves and dahlias. Auction bridge was played at twenty one tables, and at the conclusion of the games a salad and ice course was served at the small tables which were covered with dollies of pastel shades, and centered with vases of rose buds. Mrs. P.G. Dibble, Misses Catharine Pottery, Mary Alice Taylor, rebs Kent, Evelyn Howard, Minno Hardin, and Mary Ferguson Gaines assisted in the serving and receiving. The guests list included Mrs. Donald Cameron, British Columbia; Mr. and Mrs. James Brady, Mr. and Mrs. James Tubbs, and Mrs. Charles Nelson, of Sparta; members of the faculty and their wives, and members of the Round Dozen Club and their husbands. Y.W.C.A. Sponsors Manless Dance The Y.W.C.A. sponsored a manless dance in the gymnasium Thursday evening. Prizes were awarded to Misses Elsie Jobe, Ada Mary Thompson, Ruth Plumlee and Mary Virginia Lane. Music was furnished by Misses Mal Lillian Bennett and Janet Saufley and Mack Shanks, Jr. CHANGE OF ADDRESS The Staff desires each subscriber to receive the ORACLE promptly. All changes of address should be reported immediately. If the addressee has moved and the paper is being received by relatives, they should drop the paper a card, if they address is to be changed. The Staff is trying to render 100 per cent service. Campus Chatter By PAT CORNWELL The following story was submitted by a student last Thursday evening, after the freshmen had been presented with their caps a meeting was held on the front steps of the Cookeville High School by some of the freshman boys. As to whether it was a called meeting or not, no one knows. But it seems that the freshmen had congregated there, like the minute men did at Lexington during the Revolutionary war. They were waiting for an upperclassman, regardless of who it was. It befell Jimmy Lee Taylor to be the first upper classmen to pass. The freshmen president spying Taylor said, “Grab him, boys.” And grab him they did Jimmy Lee told the boys that was not the proper thing to do and that they should disperse. He was allowed to pass unmolested. After thinking the thing over, the freshmen decided to bring him back. On his reappearance, before mob of at least fifty, he was grabbed and the licks that were heard around the campus began. The freshmen had had their fun. But every rose must have its thorns, so the next day the leaders in the attack upon Taylor were seized and the day of repentance will long be remembered. ALUMNI NEWS By Selma Mitchell Rachel Hoge is teaching the sixth grade of the Lusk Consolidated School in Bledsoe County. She attended T.P.I. in 1929-30 and sends the following word: “I hope T.P.I. has an unusually successful year, and I will be glad when I can be with the old gang.” Anna Henry is at her home in Memphis. She received her degree here in 1930 and was president of Y.W.C.A. 1929-30. F.A. Clark, B.S. 31, is teaching Commerce and Economics at Lexington High School, Armon was assistant Bursar in 1929-30. Rhion McGhee, at two-year college graduate of 1920, is at the head of the Putnam Printing Company. Christine Hull, student during 1929-30, is teaching the second grade in the Hohenwald Grammar School. Ed Hudgens, who was a High School graduate in 1924 and a member of the various athletic teams while at Tech, is teaching at the Collersville High School. Herman “Blue” Nevins, Sophomore 1929-30, is a Freshman at the U.T. Medical School in Memphis. Virgil Baker, B.S., 1930, is teaching in the Elaine High School, Elaine, Ark. He was president of Upper Cumberland Literary Society 1929-30. Donald Ragland is working at the American National Bank, in Nashville. He completed his high school course at T.P.I. in 1920. Louise Huff, student during the Spring Term, 1930 is teaching at Nameless, near Granville. CLUB BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT PLANNED The day of football will soon have passed and even now a bit of basketball talk can be heard in the dormitory ball sessions and among the campustry classes. A person from each club has been selected to be a member of a rules committee. This committee met and the following rules were set forth. 1. All players must be members of one of the four college clubs. 2. Varsity players are ineligible. 3. Twelve hours of work must be passed the previous quarter. 4. Schedule starts after Christmas holidays. 5. Each team shall play every other team five games 6. The manager and coach of each team shall be a member of the club 7. Any team that fails to comply with rules will forfeit game 8. The team having the highest percentage at the end of the season shall be declared winner. Costly Village ENGLAND’S MOST COSTLY VILLAGE IS A COMMUNITY OF 24 HOUSES WITHIN THE WALLS OF Windson castle, many of them having been built in the Fourteenth century for the use of the dean and cannons of St. George’s chapel.

1931 October 28

 THE TECH ORACLE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT, MARCH 4, 5, 6 “SUPER-LIBRARY” PLANNED FOR YALE New Project Brings Memories of Eventful History of Old Yale College Library “—And Now,” as the advertisers say, “the Super-Library,” No less than 192 feet high and 85 feet square, the “book tower” is to rest within two years on the campus of Yale, costing $6,000,000, housing eventually 5,000,000 volumes, admitting two thousand readers at a time: the Sterling Memorial Library, “the largest and best-planned in the world.” Before the huge central pile, the freshman as he approaches will soon notice the smaller Memorial Hall Entrance; and entering this he finds himself in the nave of a cathedral lighted by sunrays through the stained-glass windows on a tessellated pavement; passing through and turning to the right, he is in a cloister court with a fountain and trees; above him and the massive buttresses. In a moment he disappears into the fortress or erudition protected by the Gothic style, the massive stone, the marvelous efficiency of the appointments against the distractions of the every-day human world while he glides through the mysterious shrine of Privileged Learning –The New Student. SOCIETIES TO PRESENT “AMAZON ISLE” MARCH 6 The principal incidents of the play follow. A masquerade ball is in session at the home of Cyrus B. Quackenbush (Earl Suggs), self made millionaire. It is given in honor of his oldest daughter Violet (Sheila Officer), Squire Sykes (Charles Davis) and his niece Pansy (Mary Crenshaw), arrive from Onion Center, Squire has a map of Tom Tom Island and he and Cyrus are going in partnership to hunt for a treasure buried there. The map is a stolen one. It belongs to Jack Davis (Douglas Robbins), who is in love with Rose (Elizabeth Crenshaw), Cyrus’s younger daughter, Cyrus is much opposed to Jack and has his secretary, Simpson (Robert Smith), send for a butler to throw Dawes out of the house. George (Sewell Brown), the colored butler and black faced comedian, butler and black-faced comedian gets the wrong idea and throws Cyrus out of his own house. The entire party go to Tom Tom Island. They are captured by the Amazon head hunters, a band of wild women. The Queen, Lula Palaza (Rebecca Johnston), has made George the general of her army; he having come to the island with Jack Dawes, but Dawes was () drowned. He pleads for their lives and freedom for a few more days and they all continue to hunt for the treasure. Peggy Rexcford (Robley Jobe), the social idler, has fallen deeply in love with Pansy, by chance they find the treasure. POPULARITY CONTEST CLOSES Final Ballots Cast on February 13 Much interest and enthusiasm has been manifested by Tech students during the balloting for the popularity contest which has been conducted by the Annual staff. The contest ended Saturday, Feb. 13. After having held the attention of the student body for two weeks. The winners are to be given places in the feature section of the Annual. It is hardly possible for us to mention everyone who receive votes for in some instance the votes were very widely distributed. We shall print the names of those who received the first and second highest number of votes, together with the number of votes each received. Prettiest Girl in High School Mary Ellen Rash 25,900 Lucille Cameron 5,700 Prettiest Girl in College Mary Elizabeth Ensor 23,200 Juanita Montgomery 8,300 Most Popular Girl Lucile Lee 18,400 Amy Shipley 12,600 Most Popular Boy James Miller 37,100 Lee S. Darwin 5,100 Best All-Round Boy Jesse Clark 24,500 Eddie Watson 21,100 DANTE’S “INFERNO” TO BE SHOWN HERE Saturday, February 27, Is The Date The moving picture to be shown next Friday night is a stupendous production based on the great Italian poem “The Divine Comedy” by Dante Modern film artists have left nothing undone to make this () great picture an adequate representation of that marvelous literary masterpiece. In the picture, as in the poem, we follow the travels of a person, in company with an angel, through the gruesome paths and by ways of Hades, where each unfortunate seems to have his own cell of torture and a private devil to administer the eternal punishment at opportune moments. The picture gives a splendid idea of the medieval and perhaps the modern conception of Hell. Few, if any, of us will ever take the occasion to read the poem, but we can all see the picture. It is worth your time. “EAGLES” HAVE SUCCESSFUL TRIP Win From Bethel, and Bowling Green Business University The Tech varsity basket ball team has just returned from a very successful trip to Kentucky, winning two out of three games played. Bethel was the first to fall before our attack, the score being 26 to 21. Moss and Jobe starred for Tech, and two of them scoring 25 points of the total number of points. Gish and Bush were outstanding for Bethel. Tech Line-Up Bethel Jobe (12) R.F. (9) Gish Lewis L.F. (4) Reynolds Moss (13) C. (5) Bush R. Robbins R.G. (3) Higgins Davis L.G. Baker Substitutes: Tech Denny for davis: Carr for Robbins Bethel Rogers for Higgins; Haynes for Baker. On Friday night we fell before the onslaught of the strong Ogden quint. The score was 49 to 27. Ogden had previously beaten all comers including Centre College. However, the bunch thinks they can avenge themselves next weekend when Ogden comes down for a return game. Smith, Ogden’s right forward, scored 27 points during the affair. Tech Line-Up Ogden Lewis (7) R.F. (4) Rice Jobe (8) L.F. (27) Smith Moss (7) C. (12) Hartford Davis L.G. Pickles Substitutions: Tech: M. Robbins (5) for Lewis; Denny for R. Robbins; Carr for Denny. Ogden Sledge (6) for Smith: McGinley for Hartford: Davis for Lawton. Referee: Temple. On Saturday night, contrary to () expectations, Tech downed Bowling Green Business University, who had beaten us on the local gym a few weeks before. The game was fast, cleanly played, and hotly contested. Two seconds before the game ended the score was 27 to 26 in B.G.B.U.’s favor. But just as the pistol fired M.L., Robbins attempted a long shot which went good, and was properly ruled legal by the referee. Jobe was high scorer for Tech, while Everett was most successful in ringing the basket for B.G.B.U. Tech Line-Up B.G.B.U. Lewis (2) R.F. (4) Denny Jobe (13) L.F. (4) Perisho Moss (7) C. (1) Gadd Denny (2) R.G. (13) Everett Davis L.G. (2) Clayton Substitutions: B.G.B.U.: Pitman (2) for Denny; Davis for Pitman. Tech: Carr (2) for Denny; Denny for Davis; R. Robbins for Lewis; M. Robbins (2) for Carr. THIRTEEN SCHOOLS HAVE ENTERED TEAMS Mr. J.T. Martin, of Castle Heights, Will Officials On Thursday afternoon, March 4, at 2 p.m., Tech’s third basket ball tournament will begin in full sway. Among the teams who have already sent in their application blanks properly drawn up are: Shop Springs High, the High School team of Burritt College at Spencer, Crossville High, Livingston Academy, Alpine High, White County High, Baxter Seminary, Jackson County Central High, Algood High, Monterey High, Crawford High, and Watertown High. The teams who have requested application blanks, but who have not returned them are: Lebanon High, Smith County High, Liberty High, Smithville High and Gladeville High, the winners of last year’s tournament. The Tech Preps will also enter. These teams are the pick of the Upper Cumberland section and should present the lovers of basket ball with quite an array of fast, hotly-contested games. Mr. J.T. Martin, formerly of the University of Oklahoma, and now an instructor in the Castle Heights Military Academy will officiate. The following are the rules which are to govern the tournament: 1. Each player must have been in school at least six weeks continuously, prior to March 5, 1926. 2. Each player must not be over 21 years of age. 3. Each player must be passing at least three units of standard high school work. 4. No player is eligible who has finished four years of high school work. 5. No player is eligible who played over three years of basket ball. 6. All team must be in the charge of the Coach or some member of the faculty: said member in charge to be responsible to the housing committee for the conduct of its members at all hours. 7. The tournament committee has the authority to disqualify any member of any team on any of the above reasons: also to disqualify any team or any member of any team for any misconduct on the part of any member of that team. 8. Entrance fee of $3.00 is enclosed. 9. All entrance blanks must be received by February 25th. CO-EDS LOSE TWO ON TRIP On a trip to East Tennessee last week the Tech Co-Eds lost to both Carson-Newman and Maryville by rather one-sided scores –to Carson-Newman 39 to 20 –to Maryville () 39 to 21. The Tech victory makes eleven straight for Carson-Newman. Their passing and floor-work was exceptionally good. The only consolation we get out of the game is the fact that we ran up a higher score than any other team they have encountered this season. In the Maryville game, Miss Shipley was high scorer for Tech with 15 points. For Maryville, Miss Belk was high scorer with 17 points. HISTORY OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION The Alumni Association was first organized on June 6, 1921, with T.W. Kittrell as President. Since that time the following men have been president: Cleburne Hatfield and Henry Barger, T.W. Kittrell having been elected for the third time in 1925. The growth in membership of the Association has been rapid. The first class graduated in 1918 and numbered twenty-two. The number of students receiving diplomas at the close of summer school has tripled during the three years that diplomas have been given at that time of the year. The growth of the graduating classes is shown by the following: Class of 1918 Institute graduates 10 Technical High School 7 County High School 5 Total 22 Three members of the high school class later graduated from the institute. Class of 1919 Institute Graduates 6 Technical High School 6 County High School 11 Total 23 Class of 1920 Institute Graduates 6 Technical High School 6 County High School 23 Total 41 Four members of the high school graduated later from the institute. Class 1921 Institute graduates 7 Technical High School 16 County High School 24 Total 47 One member of the college class later completed the three-year college course. Five members of the high school class graduated from the Institute, one of the five completing the three-year course. Class of 1922 Institute Graduates 12 Technical High School 27 County High School 16 Total 55 One member of the college class later completed the three-year course here. Ten members of the high school class graduated from the Institute, four of them taking their third year in college here. Class of 1923 Institute graduates 11 Technical High School 27 County High School 9 Total 47 Two of the institute graduates later completed the three year course. One of the high school graduates completed the two-years of college work here and two of them will graduate from the institute department at the close of this year. Class of 1924 Institute Graduates 14 Technical High School 44 Total 58 Two members of this class completed the three-year college course, one of them having been here for seven consecutive years. Class of 1925 Institute Graduates 6 Technical High School 51 Total 57 This was the first class to complete the three-years of college work. All six of these graduates had been graduates of the High School Department of T.P.I. at some time in the past. GRAND TOTAL 350 TENNESSEE TECH CO-EDS DEFEATS LOGAN COLLEGE In a game that was fast, and yet at the same time uninteresting, because it lacked that dash and vim so necessary to a good game of any kind. The Tennessee Tech Co-Eds defeated Logan College of Russellville, Ky. Monday night Feb 8th, 29 to 17. The Logan girls were visibly tired as a result of a long trip, but as the Tech girls were considerably below the form they had displayed the previous week in defeating the Nashville Y.W.C.A., the affair was about even. This is the first game Logan has lost this season, having previously defeated the strong Western Kentucky Normal team and others. Miss Shrader was outstanding in her efforts for Logan. In fact she is the equal of any center seen on the local court this season. Miss Shipley was high scorer of the game and for Tech with 14 points to her credit. Tech Line-Up Logan Shipley (14) R.F. (1) Belcher Shanks (4) L.F. (3) Morgan L. Whitson (11) C. (8) Shrader Moore R.G. M. Ellis Starnes L.G. Anderson Substitutions: Tech: McKeel for Starnes; A.P. Whitson for Moore; Van Hooser for Shanks. Logan: O’Neil (5) for Morgan: King for Ellis; Ellis for Anderson. King for Ellis; Ellis for Anderson. Referee: Wihite (Transylvania). Timer: Miller (Tech) Scorer: Robbins. “See here, young man,” stormed Mr. Officer from the hall at one in the morning, “do you think you can stay in the parlor with my daughter all night?” “I’ll try, sir,” replied the imperturbable Jobe modestly, “but I’m really afraid I’ll have to be leaving about four five o’clock.” EXCHANGE COLUMN A Boomerang When a bit of kindness hits ye, After passing of a cloud, When a bit of laughter gits ye An’ yer spine is feeling proud, Don’t forgit to up and fling it At a soul that’s feeling blue, For a moment that you sling it, It’s a Boomerang to you. “Face The Sun” Don’t grumble, don’t bluster, Don’t dream and don’t shirk. Don’t think of your worries, But think of your work. The worries will vanish, The work will be done. “No man sees his shadow Who faces the sun.” Something that runs in the best of families –silk hose. –The Babbler. THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING The Administration Building was erected in 1912. In 1921, some additions were made bringing the total cost of the building to $110,000. The building contains the offices of the school administration, the auditorium, library, domestic science laboratory, Chemistry Laboratory, Gymnasium, Bookstore, and Fourteen Classrooms. EXCHANGE COLUMN A chaperon is an old maid who was sweet enough to eat in her young days, but none of her suitors were hungry. –Exchange. The Charleston The Charleston began when a farmer armed with a two pronged pitchfork and a hound dog with sharp teeth and a nasty disposition caught a worthless man in his chicken run. The farmer jabbed the colored boy with the pitch fork and that brought into being the first step of the Charleston. Then the dog attaches itself to the seat of the thief’s pants making movement number two. The dance steps, alternative from that point on with successive jabs from the pitchfork and bites by the dog ending in a grand climax as the colored boy cleared a six-foot tone wall in a frenzied bound. –The Blue and Gray EAST DORMITORY The East Dormitory was erected in 1916, at a cost of $35,000. It contains twenty-five Rooms, and the School Dining Hall is located in the basement of this building. WEST DORMITORY The West Dormitory is similar in cost and construction to the East Dormitory and was also erected in 1916. The Biology Laboratory is located in the basemen of the building. If You Were Busy If you were busy being kind, Before you know it you would find You’d soon forget to think it’s true That someone was unkind to you. If you were busy being glad And cheering people who were sad Although your heart would ache a bit You’d soon forget to notice it. If you were busy being good And doing just the best you could You’d not have time to blame some man Who’s doing just the best he can If you were busy being true To what you know you ought to do You’d be so busy you’d forget The blunders of the folks you met. If you were busy being right You’d find yourself too busy quite To criticize your neighbor long Because he’s busy being wrong. PREP CO-EDS WIN TWO GAMES Friday, Feb. 5th, the Prep Co-Eds played Algood in basket ball. The following girls plaed: Hazel Thompson –Forward Virginia Wilcox –Forward Estelle Wall –Guard Annie P. Whitson –Center Letha Capps –Center Mattie Whitson –Guard Mabel Cassity –Guard Mary F. Whitson –Forward. Due to a three division court, and six players, our girls were not as successful as had been expected. The forwards played well, Thompson scoring 4 and Wilcox 6 Wall, Cassity, and Whitson guarded well throughout the game. The team outclassed Algood in every way Score 10-3. Saturday, Feb. 6 the Prep Co-Eds played Monterey Annie Pearl Whitson was the star player in the game, caging 3 long field goals in the last 4 minutes of play. The forwards played a good game, Cassity scoring 2 and Shanks 3. The guards Cassity, Wall and Whitson fought a hard game, Score 11-10. INCREASED STIPEND FOR RHODES SCHOLARS Rhodes scholars from the United States and Canada during the past 20 years, according to a statement of the American secretary of the Rhodes Trust, have made almost identical academic records at Oxford University. Among the 420 candidates for appointment considered at the last election of scholars to enter the university in October, 1926, Ohio led with 30 candidates, and Pennsylvania had 30. The stipend has been increased recently and the 32 men elected will have an annual income of 400 each for the three years of their residence at Oxford. A Warning Wives of great all remind us Men may die any time And departing leave behind them Widows more or less sublime. Widows that perhaps another Traveling through this vale of tear A bereaved and forlorn brother Might take on in spite of years They are zealous, they are earnest And a man their only goal. When they try to do their earnest You had better hunt a hole. --the babbler THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute Printed by The Herald Publishing Co. Entered as Second Class matter at the Cookeville Postoffice, Cookeville, Tenn. EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief Bryce D. Stone ’26 Assistant Editor Edward McKay ‘27 Assistant Editor Nola Quarles ‘27 ASSOCIATE EDITORS Athletics M. Douglas Robbins ‘27 Wit and Humor Robert Cox ‘30 Exchange Elizabeth Ensor ‘28 Classes Martha Sedivak ‘27 Society Sheila Officer ‘29 Alumni Hazel Wall ‘27 Literary Mary Crenshaw ‘27 BUSINESS Business Manager Lee S. Darwin ‘27 Asst. Cir. Manager Robt. Smith ‘27 Asst. Cir. Manager David Terry ‘29 Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY In a recent speech to the Chapel assembly President Smith spoke of loan funds and scholarships as being a desirable aid in building up a school. We are glad to announce that plans have already been worked out for the establishment of at least one scholarship to Tech. Details of the plan will be published later. Also, in regard to the plan for student speaking campaign we have thought for some time that students could, with proper organizations get as good or better results through this means than faculty members have gotten. But regardless of the origin or novelty of the ideas, they are good ones, and we should use them for all they are worth. Tech is a growing institution, and is now in a stage of development where every student can do something tangible towards aiding the school to increase its scope of usefulness. Do not let the opportunity pass. If you have an idea or a suggestion for improvement, take it to the administration or to some student organization. But remember that there is a remote possibility that your idea may not be practical, so do not get disappointed if it is not immediately adopted. The world is an echo that returns to each of us what we say. –Emerson. VALUE OF A COLLEGE EDUCATION The uppermost question in the mind of nearly every young man is how to achieve success and gain financial independence. There have been many men who by clean living and honest effort alone have reached positions of trust and honor in the hearts of their friends and acquaintances even though the years brought them nothing in the way of financial reward. Such a life has its compensations, but does not a man owe himself and his family something more than just the means of keeping the proverbial wolf barely from the door? The average man must think so since one of his greatest goals is to be able to enjoy a reasonable number of life’s luxuries. Bearing that thought in mind our young men energetically set forth with a high ambition to figuratively conquer the world. Entirely too many try to plunge themselves quite unprepared into the business world. What is the result? They find themselves hopelessly stranded and unable to compete with the vocationally trained men who surge over their heads every day. It is possible, of course, for a person whose education in limited to push himself into prominence by sheer common sense and will power. He can get by on this mixture of nerve, bluff, and experience; nevertheless, such a person will always be at a disadvantage in competition with trained men with an educational background. The old age is gone, and many of its axioms have been discarded. There is a college within reach of everyone. The man who fails today has no excuse and only himself to blame. The idea that colleges are institutions only for the rich and privileged has no foundation. American colleges are based upon no such principles. Indeed the very opposite is true. A college is the gateway to success. It is founded with the purpose of keeping young men of little or moderate means to become successful and capable of enjoying fuller life. On the other hand a college graduate is not given success on a golden platter the day he gets his diploma. He is prepared to fight and work for it intelligently; and when he gains prosperity he is able to enjoy it to the fullest and to spend his money for the good of himself and others. The way is open to all, but there is little time to hesitate. As said before, the old age with its standard is gone. The standard of today is most exacting, and the person who falls short is left behind and pushed into oblivion. FRIENDSHIP Friendship, peculiar boon of heav’n. The noble mind’s delight and pride To men and angels only giv’n To all the lower world deny’d --S. Johnson There is no friend like an old friend Who has shared our morning days, No greeting like his welcome, No homage like his praise --O.W. Holmes There is no better book In life, than a wise friend; For with his teaching-look His teaching-voice shall blend. --Calderson. A speaker comes to the chapel Some wise words to say He looks at the student body And then says “Let us pray.” --The blue and gray. OLD FASHIONED VALENTINE PARTY One of the most look-forward to events in Tech’s school year took place Saturday evening, Feb. 13, when the B.L.S. and S.L.S. entertained with their annual Valentine social in the form of an Old Fashioned Party. The halls and auditorium were beautifully decorated with red hearts and red and white streamers. On the stage a large red heart covered with smaller hearts held the secret of the most interesting contest of the evening. The young men shot arrows toward the heart and the small heart which they chanced to pierce contained the name of their partner for the remainder of the evening. The handsome and stately 18th century couples found one of their chief diversions in the gymnasium in the form of the Virginia Rell, which followed the grand March. In this Miss Mamye Gibson and escort were awarded the prize as the best costumed couple. Various other contests and amusements were enjoyed which proved equally interesting. Delicious refreshments consisting of brick cream, cakes and nuts, carrying out the Valentines idea were served. Tiny, red, heartshaped baskets were the lovely and unusual favors. It was a new, well planned and splendid party and one in which every guest seemed to throw himself with abandon and the single view of a good time for everyone. CAMPUS GOSSIP Jess Clark has decided to sell books again, beginning June 1. Bob Rose was seen driving with a young lady who formerly drove with Lochinvar Puckett. Trouble brewing. Fred Terry is trying to borrow $500 by June 1. Wonder why? Some dire calamity will surely overtake us, since the “Dean” has turned evolutionist, and Mr. McClanahan is now espousing the cause of fundamentalism. James Miller’s mustache seems to need pruning. Those visiting McMinnville last week were Lee Darwin and James Carlen. Simon “Selling” Suggs hasn’t offered anything new for more than a week. NEWS NOTES Among our visitors at chapel for the last few days was Mr. Coley, a traveling secretary from Bowling Green Business College. He made an interesting talk, telling us something of their school. Another visitor of much interest was Mrs. Graham secretary of Presbyterian Board of Missions. “Our Relation to Foreign Countries.” The points and illustrations she brought out made us consider the other part of the world. The Prince of “Wails” now wails louder but less frequently. MARY N. MURFREE –ONE OF OUR TENNESSEE WRITERS By Mary Crenshaw In the period immediately following the civil war there was very little literature produced in the South, and most of this was poetry. We have our supreme Southern poet—Lanier, who gave utterance to the feelings and aspirations of our entire Southland. Timrod and Hayne of South Carolina, although not as great as Lanier, helped to perpetrate Southern ideals in poetry. But during this period there was little fiction written. In 1884, “In the Tennessee Mountains” a volume of stories, was written by Miss Mary N. Murfree under the pen name, Charles Egbert Craddock. Other stories followed from her pen. In 1887 another book of short stories, “In Ole Virginia” was written by Thomas Nelson Page. These provided the stimuli for other Southern stories. Thus Miss Murfree became a leader in Southern fiction. Charles Egbert Craddock interests us not only as a Southern story writer but also because she was a Tennessean. She was the great grand-daughter of Colonel Hardy N. Murfree of revolutionary war fame and for whom the town of Murfreesboro in 1850. When a child, she had a stroke of paralysis which left her lame and could not play with other children she became a great reader and scholar. As the family fortune was greatly reduced after the civil war they moved a number of times, going from Nashville back to Grantlands and then to St. Louis. At St. Louis, Miss Murfree and her only sister, Fanny, attended a girls seminary. After they had finished school there they moved back to Murfreesboro Miss Murfree continued to devote her time to very extensive reading. As her father was a lawyer she became greatly interest in law and even wrote a book on the subject. In recognition of this, the University of the South conferred on her the honorary degree of L.L.D. However, the subject of law was not her chosen field, for she began to write stories of life in the Tennessee Mountains, where she had spent much of her time. The people there interested her; and she created many beautiful stories about them and their ways of living. Her stories appeared in the living. Her stories appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, always under the name of Charles Egbert Craddock. It was several years before her identity was known. In fact she had created much interest among critics and north men of letters, none of whom suspected that the writer was a woman. After she had published a number of stories, she went to New York, at the request of her publishers. When she was announced to them, they were completely surprised to find that Charles Craddock was a woman. Miss Murfree never married but she and her sister, Fanny, lived a very quiet life in Murfreesboro. Later in life she had very serious trouble with her eyes. They were afflicted with cataract growths and an operations was performed which was unsuccessful and she became totally blind. Although crippled and blind she was always cheerful, and cordial to her friends. She died in September, 1922. Miss Murfree’s stories are interesting because they picture a type of real life that is romantic in its simplicity and its natural air and pitiful in its ignorance and superstition. The settings are found in the East Tennessee mountains –one of the most beautiful regions of the entire South, while the characters are true mountaineers. The author has treated her subjects with a freshness and fidelity born of a keen perception and a complete familiarity with what was typical and appealing in them. Not only has she written as one who understands and sympathizes with the rugged conditions of mountain life and with the veracity of its people. And above all she tells the story well. Her descriptions are beautiful and are used to create the proper atmosphere for the story. She knew the dialect of the people and she let them tell the story in this dialect, thus adding a flavor and a charm she could not have attained in any other way. She does not criticize nor ridicule the people but shows them as nature made them. Superstition plays a great part in the life of these people and our author makes very interesting as well as weird stories based on this element. One of the best of these is “Phantoms of the Foot-Bridge.” She has not created any outstanding characters, yet she has certainly individualized her characters and made them live for us. “The Haint that walks Chilhowee” is one of her most typical stories. In this story superstition plays an important part. The author shows the people’s ignorance of law and life in the “valley.” We see something of the customs of the mountaineers’ family life. Not only do we get a good picture of the life in the mountains but also of the characters –and we must sympathize with the heroin, Clarise, in her narrow world of superstition and ignorance. Even if Miss Murfree’s stories are never classed with the truly great in literature, her work assures her an honored place among the Southern writers of her generation. Y.W.C.A. Miss Betty Webb, national Y.W.C.A. secretary, who is making a tour of the Y.W. organizations met with the group at this institution on Feb. 13. In a delightfully informal manner Miss Webb outlined the World Student Friendship fund project making suggestions whereby our small band might contribute to this international student movement, which is occupying a chief place of importance in Y.W.C.A. work at present. The plan is raising a fund for aiding needy students in all parts of the world, thus establishing friendly relations with students across the sea. The charming personality and business-like efficiency of Miss Webb won the admiration of all who came in contact with her. WILL YOUR WIFE LOVE YOU? Some writer asserts that “a French woman will love her husband if he is either witty or chivalrous; a German woman if he is constant and faithful; and Dutch woman if he does not disturb her ease and comfort too much; a Spanish woman if he wreaks vengeance on those who incur his displeasure; and Italian woman if he is dreamy and poetical; a Danish woman if he thinks that her native country is the brightest and happiest on earth; a Russian woman if he despised all Westerns as miserable Barbarians; an English woman if he succeeds in ingratiating himself with the court and the aristocracy; and American woman, if –he has plenty of money.” THE BEST YOU CAN By Nola Quarles What use to frown when things go wrong? A frown won’t set them right Be brave of heart, and sing a song To make the burden light. That this is true I quite believe He is the wisest man Who sings when care and trouble come. And does the best he can The man who broods o’er trouble finds His burdens heavier grow, As he climbs up the hill of life The wise man does not so. He gathers flowers beside the way; He says to fellow-man; “Let’s make the most of pleasant things And—do the best we can.” Think and Grin When Louise Woods Fainted Doctor No. 1: “Did you hold the mirror to her face to see if she was still breathing?” Doctor No. 2: “Yes, and she opened one eye, gasped and reached for her powder puff!” Suggs: “Don’t tell a soul, but I need five bucks.” McKay: “You can depend on me. I shall act as if you had not said a word to me about.” McCoin: “How are you?” Frank Hall: “Rotten. I’ve gotten insomnia.” McCoin: “How come?” Hall: “Woke up twice this morning in Geometry class.” “This soup isn’t fit for a pig.” Said the indignant Buford Murphy. “I will take it away,” said the waiter, “and bring you some that is.” “You will notice,” said the eccentric physics teachers as he placed his fingers on a piece of mechanism and seized the handle, “that this machine is turned by a crank.” And he wondered at the titter that went round the class. I hear that you have lost your valuable dog, Mr. McClanahan,” said a sympathetic friend. “Yes, in a railway accident. I was saved, but the dog wasn’t, “replied Mr. Mac. “Goodness! What a pity!” “Count!” McKay: “May I call this evening?” Lucille Cameron: “Oh! I’d be tickled.” “Count”: “Aw, I’m not that kind of a boy.” Mr. Hudgens: “Why is it that you are always at the bottom of the class?” Joe Frank: “Oh! I doesn’t make any difference. They teach the same at both ends.” Obliging Book Agent (entering Governor’s office): Pardon me, sir. Clement Governor (reaching for pardon slip): Certainly. What did you do? Sick Man: “The doctor has given me a month to live.” Jew: “Iss ye insured?” S.M: “Yes.” Jew: “Den vy worry?” Grocer: “So you want a job, eh? Do you ever tell lies?” William Massa: “No. But I’m willing to learn.” It’s torture “Talk about torture—” “Yes?” “nothing is worse than sitting in a barber’s chair with your mouth full of lather, watching the boy trying to give another customer your new $6 hat.” Rah! Rah! Rah! Steam Captain (who had just fallen overboard): Don’t stand there like a dumbbell! Give a yell, can’t you? Green student deckband: Certainly, sir. Captain! Rah! Rah! Rah! Captain! Sunday Morning Customer: Give me change for a dime, please. Druggist: Sure. And I hope you enjoy the sermon. Three of a Kind Jessie Beau (waiting for her to come down stairs): Is Jessie your oldest sister? Kid Brother: Yep. Jessie Beau: And who comes after her? Kid Brother: You and two other guys. TECH VANQUISHES BETHEL The highly-touted basket ball team of Bethel College, Russellville, Ky., received a rather rude jolt Tuesday night, Feb. 2, thanks to a revamped but aggressive, Tech team. Tech had much the better of a 44 to 23 contest, despite the fact that two regulars –Watson and Winningham –were missing from the line-up. Nothing daunted, however, Tech went in and come out with more spirit and desire to win than has been shown in any game of the present season. The game was rather rough, probably due to this aggressive spirit, but it was a fair one at that. And if such a spirit wins ball games, and we are inclined to think that, it does, give us more of it. put Tech on the map. Jobe was a individual star of the game, if there was one, having 18 points to his credit. He caged them from all angles with equal ease. M.L. Robbins played a good game, and added 10 points to the evening’s totals. For Bethel, Reynolds, who scored 10 points, was the whole show. Tech Line-Up Bethel Jobe (18) R.F. (10) Reynolds Lewis (3) L.F. (2) Gish Moss (8) C (3) Bush R. Robbins (2) R.G. (6) Higgins Davis (1) L.G. (2) Baker Substitutions: Tech: M. Robbins (1) for Lewis; Lewis for Jobe; Denny (2) for Moss. Bethel; Sanders for Gish; Brandenburg for Reynolds; Higgins for Bush for Higgins; Sanders for Higgins. Referee: Houtchens (Tulane). Timer: Miller (Tech). Scorers: Robbins (Tech) –Sanders (Bethel). Moss: “Is he mean?” Jelly: “Mean? Say, that guy should have apologized to the doctor when he was born.” Most marriage ties are made of beau knots. East Tennessee Teachers’ College will confer degrees on approximately 40 students at the end of the present school year. Careful psychological tests have revealed that eighty-five per cent of women are inherently insincere. We are forced to wonder how long the other fifteen per cent. Have been dead. –The Babbler. At 6 she wants a candy store, at 16 a box of sweets, at 26 a “sweet papa.” –highland Echo. The age of adolescence is when a girl begins to powder and a boy begins to puff. –The Stampede.

1926 February 20

 Freshman Number THE TECH ORACLE TECH BASKETEERS OPEN THE SEASON TECH WINS FROM WILD CATS 48-16 On Friday night, Dec. 12, the Monterey “Wildcats” came to our town, and left with the small end of a 48-16 count. The visitors were sorely outclassed, and were unable to score until the second quarter was well under way. The entire Tech team played well and with a little more training should be able to perform in excellent style. Clark at forward, and Alcorn at guard played their usual steady game, and the newcomers who showed good form were Blount, Jobe, Watson, Gipson Poteet, and Puckett. Blount was the high scorer of the game with 11 points, and Clark was second with 10. Jobe and Gipson were tied for third honors with 8 points each. Blount and Jobe played the floor in excellent style, while Alcorn showed his old form in guarding the basket. With these men, and those who will be added to the squad after the holidays, Coach Overall should be able to develop a very strong squad Among the newcomers to the squad Carr, a guard, from Livingston, looks to be the best bet. The lineups follow: Tech Monterey Blount (11) F Garrett (4) Clark (10) F Holloway (4) Winningham (6)C Hicks (4) Alcorn (4) G Ledbetter (4) Score by halves: Tech—27; 21: Total, 48. Monterey—6; 10 Total, 16. Substitutes: Tech—Jobe (8) for Winningham; Puckett for Alcorn; Gipson (8) for Clark; Poteet (4) for Blount; Blount for Gipson; Tardy for Alcorn; Smith for Blount; Masters for Poteet; McCulley for Winningham. Monterey –Romines for Garrett; Garrett for Hicks; Mitchell for Ledbetter. START BOOSTING THE TOURNAMENT FEB. 19, 20, 21 TECH DEFEATS BAXTER FIVE On Friday night, Jan. 9, Tech clashed with the strong Baxter Seminary quint, resulting in a 28-16 count, with Tech on the large end. The game was, on the whole, slow and marred by much roughness. The visitors received ten of the personal penalties, while 9 were chalked against Tech, Jobe was expunged via the foul route. The Seminary outfit presented a very strong defense, but very mediocre shooting by the Tech offense kept () the score to the low margin. All the Tech men missed many close shots, several of which should have been counters. They also failed to convert ten of the sixteen free throws which were offered them. The visitors converted four their twelve free shots. Tech held the lead throughout the entire fray, but the lead never was so commanding that Coach Overall would send the scrubs in. Watson and Judd were tied for scoring honors with 8 points each, and were easily the stars of their respective teams. Blount and Jobe played well for Tech, and Anderson and Swallows presented a stubborn defense to the Tech offense. The lineups: Tech Pos. Baxter Clark (c) (7) RF Boyd (5) Blount (4) LF Judd (8) Jobe (4) C Phillips (3) Watson (8) RG Anderson Pucket (1) LG Swallows Substitutions: Tech—Alcorn (2) for Puckett: Winningham for Jobe, Jobe for Clark; Poteet (2) for Jobe; Jobe for Blount; Blount for Poteet; Poteet for Winningham Puckett for Watson. Field goals –Clark 3, Blount 2, Watson 2, Jobe 2, Poteet 1, Alcorn 1, Philips 1, Judd 3, Boyd 2. Fouls –Clark 1 in 1, Blount 0 in 5, Jobe 0 in 2, Watson 4 in 5, Puckett 1 in 1, Alcorn 0 in 2, Judd 2 in 8, Boyd 1 in 2, Phillips 1 in 1, Swallows 0 in 1 Official –Clark, Referee Boys’ Schedule (Tentative) Jan. 19 –Lincoln Memorial here Jan. 23 –Normal, here Jan. 27 –Maryville, here Feb. 2 –Cumberland, here Feb. 9 –Castle Heights, here Feb. 16 –Castle Heights, there. Feb. 21 –S.P.U., here Feb. 25 –S.P.U., there Feb. 26 –Bethel, there Feb. 27 –Ogden there Feb. 28 –Bowling Green Business College, there FRESHMAN COLLEGE The Freshman College class held the first meeting of the Winter term Jan. 7, in the English room Wheeler Allen was elected manager of the boys’ basketball teams. Miss Vaughn serves as manager of the girls’ team. This class is at present the largest in school, there being 77 on the roll. The following students have joined the class this term: Nona Webb, Alice Elizabeth Tardy, Dena Langford, Marie McCoin, Margaret Peters, Reuben McCoin, Hellen Stonecpher, Stanley Carr, Irene Paschall, Benton Carr, Lester King, Gaskil Whitaker, Henry Chapman Hargis, Mary Tom Johnson, Wheeler Allen, Frank Loomis, Ethel Smith, and Percy Neely. FRESHMAN RESOLUTIONS Ban McDearman –Resolved always to sit on the front seat in McClanahan’s classes. Lee Sadler Darwin –Resolved not to go to Alabama “on business” this year. Fred Terry –Resolved not to put any more CS2 on dog. Jimmie Miller –Resolved not to go to Granville or Algood but to go to the dormitory instead. Bill Johnson –Resolved not to sit by Fred any more in Psychology. Lucile Lee—Resolved not to let Buff get out of my sight. Merrill Hughes –Resolved not to burn more than ten gallons of gas per week for the presiding elder. Dan Jarvis –Resolved not to cry when my sweetie sends a telegram that the bus has broken down. Bill Johnson –Resolved to quit grinning for 23 minutes. Alex Shipley –Resolved not to make love to any girl but Mary Frances McKay –Resolved not to flirt with more than a half dozen girls at the same time. Dale Lee –Resolved never to return to Hornbeak, Tenn. Katherine Hargis –Resolved to quit flirting. Eleanor Haile –Resolved to quit flirting. Frances Huffman –Resolved not to let Puckett go with any other girls. The Freshman Class –Resolved not to be any greener than nature intended us to be. COLLEGE FRIENDSHIPS In attempting to present a few thoughts on “College Friendships” there are at least four questions that readily come to mind: Just what do we mean by “College Friendships,” upon what do they depend. Where are they cultivated, and what is their value? In this article each shall be dealt with separately and in order. There are at least three different ways in which college friendship may be construed. First, most people are prone to consider college friendships as mere acquaintances, but this is not friendship in its truest sense. However, there () are, and should be many mere acquaintances formed in college, especially in large colleges. Others consider friendships as personal associations with fellow students. Many of you have had and will have many personal associates from whom you derived much lasting good, but we cannot call even this real friendship, even though the great majority of college friendships come under this class. The last class of friendships we will call true friendships. A true friend is your counselor when advice is needed. Bacon in his essay on Friendship has said: “The light that a man receiveth by counsel from another is drier and purer than that which cometh from his own understanding and judgement which is ever infused and drenched in his afflectations and customs. A true friend will share his comforts, his means, or anything he might possess if you are in need. College friendships depend to a great extent upon the class of the students in school. First of all there are the bashful and shy students, of which there are but a few. This bashful condition among students is usually due to one of two factors. Either they have no natural attraction or they are too obvious of self. They make very few friends or a sociates until they are made to forget their peculiar characteristics. And one of the best remedies is friendship. They should be befriended at once, especially if they are new students, because a friendless student is apt to get discouraged and will leave school at almost any opportunity. Second, there is the care-free, happy-go-lucky kind of student, who isn’t much of a student after all. He makes the poorest friends because he does not take things seriously enough to be of any real service as a friend. His association should be cultivated, however, for friendship’s sake, if for no other reason. Third, there is the amiable and sociable type of student who has personality and natural attraction; you see friendship written all over his being. This kind of student makes the most desirable and lasting friendships, and should, therefore be diligently sought after. College friendships may be cultivated in various school organizations and functions. A very important place where personal associations may be made is in the societies and fraternities. More lasting friendships are made in college fraternities than in possibly any other school organization. At present we do not have fraternities in Tennessee Tech; but with the advent in the near future of a four-year college course we will undoubtedly have fraternities to promote friendships and perpetuate college traditions. Other important places where friendships are wont to be made are the various college social functions. Chief among these may be mentioned parties and picnics. Personal associations may also be had in the class-room, where the constant intermingling should produce a closer relationship between each student. Lastly, personal associations and more especially true friendships may be cultivated among dormitory students. In dormitory life roommates are thrown together, and it is a natural consequence that more lasting friendships should be there formed. College friendships are of inestimable value not only during school days; but also in the after years. First of all friendships open the heart. Francis Bacon aptly expresses the thought as follows: “No receipt openeth the heart but a true friend; to whom you may impart griefs, joys, fears, suspicions, counsels, and whatever lieth upon the heart to oppress it.” Friendships help clear the understanding, on which we again quote Bacon: “Certain it is, that whosoever hath his mind fraught with many thought, his wits and understanding do clarify and break up in the communicating and discoursing with another: he tosseth his thoughts more easily; he marshalleth them more orderly, he seeth how they look when they are turned into words; finally, he waxeth wiser than himself, and that more by an hour’s discourse than by a day’s meditation.” Friendships broaden the student’s outlook on life. Some famous writer has said, among his other writings, “I am a part of all I have met” This expression may be very fittingly applied even to mere acquaintances, but with friends we have more than met –we have well met. Consequently, constant association with friends cannot fail to impress upon the student their ideals –what they are and what they are striving for. DOUGLAS ROBBINS HOW FRESHMEN SPEND THEIR TIME Annie Pearl Larkin –Primping Martha Sedivack –Chewing gum. Bill Johnson –Where Fred is. Frances Huffman –With Puckett. Douglas Robbins –Arguing. Merrill Hughes –At the presiding elder’s. Tommie VanHooser –In the restaurant. Count McKay –Writing love letters. Effie Wood –Don’t have any. Lester King –Chemistry lab Ban McDearman –Talking. Gaskil Whitaker –Filling up space. “Algood” Bunch –Together. Catherine Hargis –Flirting. Lucille Lee –Keeping up with Buff. H. A. XIV Girls –Gossiping. Buff LeFevre –Ringing the bell. Robley Jobe –Down the Sparta Pike. James Carlen –Cutting Chapel. Ed Huggens –Doing nothing. Ruby McKeel –Practicing basketball. Eleanor Haile –Serving on committees. Wheeler Allen –Studying Botany. Margaret Vaughan –Inventing a way to keep from studying Lillian Pointer –Singing. “Sis” Bracey –Grinning. Frank Loomis –Building dams. Jimmie Miller –Getting subscriptions for Tech Oracle. Lee Sadler Darwin –Going to Alabama. Nona Webb –Looking for a letter from Raymond. Mary Tom Johnson –Watching for a Ford roadster. CO-EDS LOSE TO M.T.N. SCORE 30-16 Saturday night the Tech Co-Eds were handed the smaller end of a 30-16 score, in the City Gym, at the hands of the Middle Tenn. “Normalities.” We were somewhat outclassed by the visitors, but this was the first college game in which several of our girls had ever participated, and on the whole we think that our girls made a very creditable showing. Had the goal shooting of our girls made a very creditable showing. Had the goal shooting of our girls been more accurate we should have had a much better count, for many of the easy tosses went to naught. The work of the guards was very good, and they broke up many of the visitor’s passes and held the score to a low count. For the visitors Miss Marshall, at center, was the outstanding star, scoring over half of her team’s points and also playing the floor well. Miss Pope, also played well, donating eleven points. Beasley, a former Tech girl, was kept at bay by excellent guarding by Moore. The visiting guards also played well. The lineup follows: M.T.N. Tech Pope (11) F Shipley (10) Beasley (3) F Vaughan Marshall (16) C Whitson (6) Jones G Haile Snell G Moore Substitutions : M.T.N –Gannaway for Marshall. Tech: McKeel for Haile; Shanks for Vaughan; Vaughan for Shanks; Haile for McKeel Referee, Overall Score by quarters; M.T.N. 1-13-11-6-30. Tech 6-0-6-4-16 TECH TOURNAMENT Feb 19, 20, 21. WANTED-A NAME! Tech has made remarkable progress in athletics during the past few years, but no one has suggested a name for the teams that have brought honor to the school by their prowess. We feel that the name should come from the student body, so we are giving each student an opportunity to suggest one name by filling out the blank below and placing it in the Oracle mail box in the office. All names must be turned in by Wednesday, January 21st. I wish to submit the following name for Tech Teams: T.P.I. TOURNAMENT BEST Feb. 19, 20, 21. YET THE TECH ORACLE Official Publications of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Printed by Herald Publishing Co. Entered at the Cookeville Post Office. Second class rate pending. STAFF Bryce D. Stone ’26 Editor-in-Chief Eleanor Haile ’27 Asst. Ed.-in-Chief Associate Editors: Dewitt T. Puckett ’25 Wit and Humor Shelia Officer ’29 Social Amy Shipley ’28 Class Hallie Ray ’25 Faculty John J. Bell ’26 Exchange Hendon Johnston ’26 Athletic Thos. L. Passons English Alex Shipley Poet Business Department: James D. Miller ’27 Business Manager Jack Morrison ’26 Assistant Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY T.P.I. FOUR YEAR COLLEGE CLASS THE AIM Whether or not T.P.I. will become a four year college depends upon the student body. If the students will T.P.I. enough all of the Senior Class of ’25 will return and bring some one with them. The old saying is that “It pays to advertise,” and the best way to advertise is through the student body. The aim of the Class of ’27 is to make T.P.I. a four year college within a year or two. The class is determined to have its wish “Where there is a will, there is a way.” The approval of the faculty is necessary to make a movement of the student body a success. T.P.I. is as well equipped as the Normal schools, and has better equipment than many of the smaller colleges of the state. Having the equipment, why not have the students? It is up to every member of this class to do all he can to make this school the success it should be. Start the drive for new students today and do not stop until our ideal is realized. It seems that a majority of the High School Class of ’25 will be back next year. This year the Freshman Class has 77 members, the largest number in the history of the school. What is there that 77 high-spirited Freshmen can not do? Start the drive today! Let’s go, Freshmen! E.B. HUDGENS What’s a bride? A new broom, that hangs around the parlor for the first month, but spends the rest of its days in the kitchen. NEW STUDENTS ENTERTAINED On Thursday evening, January 8, the Sherwood and Belles Lettres Literary Societies gave a reception for the new students in the Auditorium. A very entertaining program, given by members of the two societies, was as follows: Welcome Address Dewitt Puckett Piano Solo Velma Murphy Declamation Alton B. Adams Aims of the Society Effie Wood Solo D.T. Puckett Popular Music Merrill Hughes Debate: Does marriage increase the happiness of the person married? Affirmative, Miss Clyde Jackson. Negative, Gilber H. Hatfield. Jokes… Alex B. Shipley The program was concluded by the serving of refreshments, after which a very delightful social hour was spent in playing Virginia reel and other games. The evening was pronounced a great success. Perhaps the high point of interest in the program was the debate. Discussing a question of wide popular appeal and utmost importance both speakers were at their best. Of course, experienced and competent judges could not be found in the societies but an effort was made to procure ones with open minds. However, the deep-founded convictions of the two near-bachelors could not be overcome, and the negative was awarded the decision by a vote of two to one. The Sherwoods and Belles Lettres wish again to express their sincere appreciation of the presence of so many new students. We wish them to understand that the societies are open to them the same as the oldest student in school. Our highest aim and desire is for the uplifting and inspiration of the individual and not for the glorification of the society as a whole. It is hoped that as a result of the impression received by the new students, they will be influenced to join one of the societies. We are not so egotistic as to hold out visionary claims incapable of realization, nor do we expect that all or even a large majority of the new students will affiliate with our societies, but if an interest in society work can be created and they can be influenced to join some society our aim will have been accomplished. SOCIAL AFFAIRS A crowd of the college boys and girls were entertained with a beautifully arranged dance given by Whitney White at his country home, Dec. 24. Music was furnished by the “Joyland Six.” At a late hour delicious refreshments were served. Forty guests enjoyed the occasion. HILL-DOWELL Miss Edna Dowell and Mr. Holmes Hill were married on January 1, at the home of the bride. The bride graduated from T.P.I. in the High School cass of 1923. She is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.B. Dowell, and the groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Hill. They will reside with the groom’s parents. FRESHMAN FROLIC Combustible Bobby: “Do you know Fat Burns?” Bill: “No.” Bobby: “Well, it does.” A Novelty Dale: “I have an idea.” Lee Sadler: “Be good to it; it’s in a strange place.” Will She Turnip Her Nose? My Sweet Potat: Do you carrot at all for me? My heart beets for you. You are the apple of my eye. If we cantaloupe lettuce marry. We will be a happy pear. If Nevada wore Arizona’s New Jersey, what would Delaware? Alaska St. Peter (to applicant): “You say you were editor of the Tech Oracle?” Applicant: “Yes, sir.” St. Peter: “Take the elevator.” Applicant (stepping into elevator): “How soon does it go up?” St. Peter: “Up? It doesn’t go up; it goes down.” Hendon: “I have electricity in my hair.” James: “You ought to have. It is attached to a dry cell.” Mr. Passons: “What are the three words most commonly used in English?” Willie Hudgens: “I don’t know.” Mr. Passons: “Correct” Jimmy: “I see where three persons were killed in a feud yesterday.” Effie: “Those little cheap cars are dangerous.” Jobe: “I heard that Mr. Passons received compensation because of deafness caused while in the army.” McKay: “Huh. He can hear well enough in class.” James W. (loudly): “John T. Jr., come here and get this dog!” Y.W.C.A. We are exceedingly glad to have so many former members back with us this term. We are planning to make the work of the Y.W.C.A. a better success this year than ever before. There has been a number of new girls who have already become interested and expect to become members soon. The regular meeting was held in the parlor Wednesday, January 7, 1925, and the following program was given: Song All Prayer Catherine Hargis “Thou Shalt Love Thy Neighbor as Thyself” Clyde Jackson Music Johnnie Bilbrey Story Mildred McDearman Song All Benediction All The moving picture machine is now ready for use. The Y.M. and Y.W. have charge of it. There will be several educational pictures shown, starting in the near future. Only a small admission fee will be charged. We want to urge every student to come. Every one is invited to attend the vesper services which will be rendered in the Chapel of the Administration Building every Sunday afternoon at 5 o’clock. JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL The Junior High School class met Wednesday, Jan. 7, to elect officers for the present term. Suggestions were given to the class by former presidents for a better organized class. New members were welcomed and old ones received. We hope to improve under the leadership of the new president, Donald Ferrell. The other officers are: Vice-President, Arrie Bohannon; Secretary, Maurine Quarles, Treasurer, Hubert Davis; Critic, Willis Huddleston; Sergeants-at-arms, Jno. T. Berry, Agnes Greenwood; Reporter, N.E. Ensor. Palladians The first meeting of the Palladian Literary Society for the year 1925 was held Jan. 5. Election of to lead the black and gold for the officers took place. Those elected Winter term were: Catherine Hargis, President; Williard Johnson, Vice-President; Johnnie Bilbrey, Secretary; Lilian Pointer, Treasurer, and Anne Elizabeth Bracey, Critic. BELLES LETTRES The Belles Lettres met in the regular meeting room January 5, 1925. A very interesting program was rendered, which consisted of the following numbers; Roll Call –Answered with New Year resolutions. Welcome to New Students –Miss Myrtle Bullock The value of a Literary Society Lola Massey. A Pathetic Reading –Vallie Huddleston. Jokes –Ruth VanHooser. Miss Gladys Bohannon, a former member of the society, was present and made a very interesting talk. Plans were completed for the reception to be given Thursday evening, January 9, by the Belles Lettres and Sherwood Societies, in honor of the new students. The following committees were appointed: Refreshments, Beulah Clark, Maurine Quarles, Anna Montgomery. Decorations, Lucile Lee, Mabel Cassety. LOCALS Miss Mabel Womack, Class of ’24, who is now attending the Conservatory of Music at Boston, spent the holiday season with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. Womack. Robert and Edward Gibson, Classes of ’20 and ’21, came from University of Tennessee to spend the holidays at home. Glenn Sisk, son of Prof. T.K. Sisk, a former T.P.I. teacher visited in Cookeville during Christmas vacation. Miss Callie Marcom, College Class of ’24, was recently married to Mr. J.D. Anderson. Misses Lillian Young and Mary Cox, Class of ’22, who are studying in Nashville, were at home recently. Old students who have recently visited the school include Messrs. Cleburne Hatfield, Odessa Johnson, John Frazier, Leonard Dunavin; Misses Mabel Womack and Delia Gentry. Harry Jenkins, Gillem Maxwell, and Levi Cooper, former T.P.I. students at Vanderbilt spent the holidays in Cookeville. John and Nan Holladay were at home from Milligan College. We are glad to welcome Mr. McClanahan back as our instructor in Psychology.

1925-01-15

 

1924 December 1

Page 148 from The Eagle yearbook for 1997-1998.

1998

 Tournament Girls, Welcome to Tech! “It Happened in June” Presented by Upper Cumberland and Palladian Societies, March 25th The Upper Cumberland and Palladian Literary Societies will present "It Happened In June" at the city school auditorium March 25th. This play is a beautiful story abounding in mirth and action. It will be directed by Mr. Pinkerton who has had considerable experience' in directing dramatic preformances. The cast has been chosen, and is one of ability and reputation, some of which have appeared in a number of plays in Cookeville. The cast is as follows : Bettie Branson, pretty young owner of the Shady Grove Store —Samie Ruth Womack ; Susie Crundle,—Betty's best friend and nearest neighbor —Ann Elizebeth Bracey ; Nell Crundle, Susie's 11yr. old sister—Pearl Cornwall; Mollie Jessop, cook for the Bransons—Jessie Barnes; Evalina Scroggs, homeliest girl in the village —Milly White, Charles Atkins, a young visitor in Shady Grove —Eugene Collier, Randy Stewart, his friend who sells insurance —Donald Moore, Jim Pritchett, a village character with nothing to do in particular —Hendon Johnston, Jarvis Sneed, the meanest man in the country and president of the Shady Grove Bank —James Carlen. Tournament visitors you have seen us. How do you like us? Come back to Tech when you can stay longer! MEETING OF ALUMNI EXECUTIVE COUNCIL The Executive Council of the Alumni Association met on February 7th with the following members present: Bryce D. Stone, President, Hazel Wall, Secretary and Treasurer, Leonard Dunavin, Rebecca Johnston, Odell Cornwell, T. W. Kittrell. Plans were discussed for establishing two scholarships, one for boys and one for girls, to be paid out of the dues of the Association. These scholarships will probaly be awarded to students who make the highest average in the freshman year at Tech, but definite plans will be worked out later. The president and secretary (Continued on Page 6) Tournament Begins Thursday Evening, Twelve Teams are Entered. Miss Genevieve Collins, Peabody College, Will Referee. Twelve teams have entered the Girls, Tournament to be held Feb. 24th, 25th, 26th,. This is the first year that T. P. I. has held a tournament for the girls, although the boys' tournament has been an annual event for several years. This tournament is lure to be a success this year and we hope that it will continue to be held every year from now on. The following teams are entered, Pleasant Hill Academy, Alpine High School, Gainesboro, Granville, Watertown, Viola, Algood, Rickman, Red Boiling, Smithville, Cookeville City School and T. P. I. Preps. Efforts are being made to secure Miss Genevieve Collins Head of Physical Education for Women. Peabody College as referee for the tournament. Bulldogs Helpless After Licking By Eagles The Cumberland Bulldogs crawled back to their kennel, Tuesday night, dragging behind them the short end of a court which read 28 to 20. The Eagles played one of their best games, but at times they seem to be matching mits with those of their equal. Through it all the Bulldogs threatened from time to time, but after the first quarter the locals were always able to climb away to a good margin when things began to look a bit panicky. The fan who sees them all was asked Monday, "What's the matter with T. P. I." He scratched his head. Asked the same question Tuesday until about half past nine he said, "nothing at all". When the rifle -shot pass was fumbled or overthrown a week ago it went straight to the wash and was handled as clean as possible. Where a shot fell off to one side last week it slid through tie loaf in fact one shot made by Vaughn actually climbed back into the basket after over half of it was falling The game was no set- up. There was one, Roberson, in a red uniform, who offered to show something of the art of basketball. He ran the team and worked himself in and out in good style but when the Bulldogs did succeed in working the ball back to crip shot range sue of his twelve foot jumps to block the throw at the hoop." and ran up a count 7 to 3 by the end of the first quarter but when the Eagles got their hooping machine to going they came ahead in double quick time. Moss and Winningham drew the anger of the Bulldogs offense, the reason being that they were the monkey wrenches that presested in gumming up the cogs of the Lawyer’s goaling machine. Vaughn worked the floor in his usual style and made good many difficult shots. He was the high scorer of the game. Winningham the genial back guard, brought the house down when he ended one of his fast trip up the floor with a long loop without touching anything but the netting. Watson's work in intercepting enemy passes was good. The officiating of the referee Clark was the kind which makes the game a game. Line Ups Tech (28) Cumberland (20) Vaughn (10) F Frilts (3) H. Evans (3) F Martin (4) Moss (7) C Robinson (9) Rubbins G Goodman (3) Winningham (6) G Hicks Substitutes: Tech – Watson. Refree –Clark Opera to be given by Glee Club The T. P. I. Glee Clubs are working on a light opera, The Pirates of Penzance, which they are planning to give some time during the spring term. Mr. James Greer will sing the part of the pirate chief and Oyama Winningham is the pirate apprentice. Robert Smith is a major-general in the British army and Fannie Wright Jarvis is his youngest daughter. Beulah Allison, Virgie Lowery, and Elsie Young are daughters of the major-general also, and Emily Stanton takes the part of maid-of-all-works. The boys' ad girls' choruses add very much to the charm of the opera. The scene is laid on a desert island and the whole opera promises to be unusually interesting. We are glad you are here. We wish that we could keep you. Boys’ Tournament March 3rd 4th 5th, With Twenty-five Teams Entered The fourth annual Upper Cumberland Basketball Tournament for Boys will be held at the City High School Gymnamim on Mar. 3, 4, and 5. Twenty two teams have entered, thirteen of which have been here before. The list is as follows : Gainesboro, Celina, Livingston, Alpine, Baxter, Al-good, Watertown, Granville, Spencer, Smithville, Jamestown, Monterey, Cookeville Junior High School, T. P. I. preps, McMinnville, Manchester, Viola Dunlap,' Gordonville, Carthage, Crossville and Pikeville. That three teams that have won tournaments are: Granville, Gladeville, and Alpine. Many students now in T. P. I. have played on various teams during former tournament. Among them are G. Winningham, Richardson, K. Evans, H. Evans Vaughn, Greenwood, Woods, Mallory, S. Carr, Rich, Dowell, M. Gates, C. Davis, Butler, Poteet, Hargis. Basketball fans will have an opportunity to see as many games as they like during this tournament which is one of the outstanding events of the year. Co-eds Lose to Murfreesboro After holding the lead into the middle of the third quarter, the T.P.I. girls lost to middle Tennessee Teachers College 29-13. The score at end of first quarter was 6-1, T. P. I. leading. At half, the score was 9-7, T. P. I still ahead. Third quarter-19-13, Normal ahead; final score, 29-13 with Normal ahead. The score does not indicate the closeness of the game. The first half of the game was fast and interesting, but the second half was rough and the playing was ragged. Beasley was high scorer of the game, with 19 points: A. P. Whitson was next with 11 points. Lineup: Tech M.T.T.C. A.P. Whitson (11) F Beasley (19) Thompson (2) F Pitt L. Whitson C Vaughn Moore G Dillon Haile G Jones Referee Josh Hughes Substitutes, Normal: Templeton, Keeling, Ganaway. A school is prosperous in proportion to the horsepower and horse sense of its boosters. Can You Answer These Questions? Ask Biology Students about These Questions Which Are Studied in That Class The following are a few of the questions asked and discussed in the biology class. Some may appear easy and simple, but when studied scientifically have an important bearing on various subjects. 1. Do snakes have feet? 2. Do earthworms have a brain? 3. What means of communication do bees have? 4. How does an oyster eat? 5. Can a toad taste foot? 6. What are vitamins? 7. Do fish have blood? 8. What is the smallest animal in the world? 9. What is the smallest plant in the world? 10. How are leaves of plants made green? 11. What is the morphology of yeast? 12. Is there anything older than its mother? 13. What is life? 14. How is bread mould formed? 15. What is “Pond scum”? 16. Does a crawfish have a backbone? 17. Do honey bees see? 18. How many eggs does a queen bee lay per day? -The Babbler Bethel Five Wins from Tech by 39 to 17 Score Bethel College took revenge from Tenn. Tech in their home gym. Friday night Feb. 11. For the first half the teams were evenly matched. They swapped fumbles and bad passes after the rest period the Kentuckians took the floor, with renewed energy and overcome small margin that the Eagles held on them, never to be checked. The crip shots that the Kentuckians were permitted to make marked the decisive part of the game. Line Up Tech Bethel Evans F Regnold Vaughn F Higgins Winningham C Sanford Robbins G Rogers Watson G Cabrey Subs: Tech –Cobb, R. Evans, Johnson and Davis Bethel: Girh. Referee: Johnson Upper Cumberland Chooses Affirmative Side of Question for Debate The Upper Cumberland debater have chosen the affirmative side of the question submitted by the Sherwoods for the annual intersociety debate which is: Resolved, That Labor Unions as they now exist, are on the whole beneficial to the American people. Both teams are strong and will represent their societies well. College Finances Let students pay for education now suggested Let students pay for the entire cost of education. Here is a means of eliminating the necessity for perpetual begging, for the brother and danger of million dollar drives so at least thought some of the del-agates to a recent Association of American Colleges convention at Chicago. Instead of paying only 31 per cent of educational cost as they do now, college students should foot the entire educational bill, argued Trevor Arnett, authority on college finance, who represented the Carnegie Institute. He recommended that tuition fees be raised gradually to cover the entire cost of college courses. Scholarship loans and student aids of all kinds should be utilized to enable students to meet this additional charge, he said. Money now used for endowment could be diverted to these channels. Alfred College Experiments While discussion goes on, one college has lately begun to experiment with this new idea. The forthcoming catalog of Alfred University (New York) carries the announcement that tuition fees will be gradually increased to meet the cost of education. By a cooperative agreement the Harmon Founda lion premises to lend money to students unable to furnish cash. The tuition will increase gradually during the next three years, from the present amount of $150 year to $300. Eventually, Alfred University announces, this move will free education from the "stigma of eleemosynarism". Students Will Borrow Students will, of course, not be expected to pay the entire fee at once, except in rare cases only $150 or possibly $100, will be asked for in cash payment. The deferred obligation will be turned over to tuition within the next five years. In return, the Foundation will furnish the University with cash for current operating expenses. This is not the first attempt of the Harmon Foundation to lend money to students for completing their education. Since 1922 groups of students in 60 colleges have been borrowing from this source. The money loaned for a period of five years, to be repaid in installments of $10 per month. So far the plan has been quite successful; out of 357 borrowers only two have failed altogether in their payments. Students Will Lend Meanwhile something new under the sun, a system of student loans, has been established. Palaeopitus Dartmouth student government has begun the system of student loans described in the New Student of December 8. The following are the main provisions in the measure passed by Palaeopitus: 1. This fund shall be known as The Palaeopitus Student Loan Fund, the appropriation for which shall be made by Palaeopitus from the College Chest and shell be administered by the Committee hereinafter described. 2. The purpose of this fund shall be solely to furnish financial aid for any Dartmouth undergraduate who would otherwise be unable to meet his college bills in acceptance with the regulations of the college, “No student shall be perceived to register any semester take the final examination in course unless all college bills at that time are paid.” This fund shall be super by treasurer of the College man, a committee of three of the personnel department, the treasurer of Palatopitus, the Personnel officer acting Chairman of the Committee –Student Automobile Dictionary Carburetor –The place from all trouble starts. The Tech Oracle Official Publication of the students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Published Semi-monthly Subscription rates $1.50 per year Editorial Staff Editor in Chief Hazel Wall Assistant Editor Eleanor Haile Assistant Editor Benton M. Carr Associate Editors Athletic Harry Burrow Wit and Humor Robert Smith Exchange Alberta Cassetty Class Editor Lucille Lee Society Odell Cornwell Alumni Rebecca Johnston Feature Editor Jonnie Bilbrey Poet Vadus Carmack Business Manager David Terry Assistant Business Manager Circulation Manager Paul Tidwell Asst. Circulation Manager Alfred Gill Faculty Advisor J.M. Hatfield Printed by Herald Publishing Company. Entered at the Cookeville post office. Second-class rate pending. Dear Old Dad Sammie Ruth Womack We honor our mother and love her more than any other woman living, but I sometimes wonder if “dear old dad” does not grow a wee bit jealous of all the love and devotion we lavish on her? You rarely ever heard dad praised. He is the man that pays the bills –the fellow we go to when we are in need of money, and in many instances he is hardly considered a member of the family. I love my mother as much as any of you, but my father holds a place in my heart that no one can fill; and so it is of our “dear old dad” that I would speak to you today. When our fathers married and took upon themselves the responsibilities of family life, they were practically all of them young of perhaps younger than you college boys. They had the same love of life, the same enthusiasm in sports, and the same capacity of enjoyment that you boys have. Probably none of them and the advantages of a college education, but no matter from what station of life they came, they had a good time. All this they gave up for us. What have we done for them? They do not except much from us; but they do expect and we show them due respect and that we make the most of the opportunities which they have made it possible for us to have. Our fathers are human beings, and they enjoy being loved and praised as much as our mothers do. We have a mother’s day, a young peoples’ day, and recently in Nashville a week was set aside as boys’ week. But where does dad’s day come in? I know the fathers have long ago lost faith in the old adage “that every dog has his day”. Let us consider how hard they have worked and toiled for us and what we owe them in return. Some of them have worked from early morning until late at night in order that we may have better advantages than they had. They are happy in our success and they have long ceased to dream of what they might have been and they have transferred their dreams and ambitions to the lives of their children. What proud father has not pictured to himself his son as a president? And thus it is if we would make dad happy and make him feel that all his efforts have not been in vain, we must do our best in everything. Let us not think of dad as an outsider and one who can not understand things. The reason many of us have formed this opinion of our fathers is that we have not given him a chance to prove himself otherwise. We have lived under the same roof all these years, and yet understand each other as much as do the rankest of strangers. Young people, this applies to you. May I ask that you get acquainted with him and make him your partner and pal in every place of your life. He will enjoy hearing all your joys and your sorrows and will take pride in helping you. Long ago the idea was formed that the whole existence of the family depended upon the mother, but this idea has been proved false as it was formed in a time when so many fathers turned down their families for strong drink. We have ceased to say that when we lose our mothers we have lost our best best friend, but that we have lost one of the best friends, for our father is, in truth, as good a friend as our mothers. And let us not wait until t is too late to show dad we love and appreciate him but if we have any roses for him, give them to him now instead of putting them on his grave. Palladians and Upper Cumberlands Have a Valentine Program “With a steady swing and an open brow We have tramped the way together.” The Palladians and their follow workers, Upper Cumberlands, were loath to admit the passing of a festival day without some commemoration. And accordingly, when Valentine came, thinking of past work together and “The leagues that lie before us” they met together in the auditorium and left on the program books of the society a few numbers for future members to be proud: Devotional –Baily Bockman Vocal Duet –Beulah Allison and Robert Smith, accompanied by Dan Jarvis Declamation –Paul Moore The program was as concluded with a Valentine contest, and prizes were awarded O’dell Cornwell, Polly Hudgens and Beulah Allison. Death of Mr. Henderson’s sister We were very sorry to learn of the death of Mrs. A. G. Scott which occurred at her home in Jonesboro, Arkansas, on February 11 after an illness of several months. Mrs. Scott was a sister of Mr. J. M. Henderson and the mother of Allen G. Scott, who was a student of T. P. I. at the beginning of the fall quarter. He was called home on account of the illness of his mother and was unable to return. We extend our deepest sympathy to Mr. Henderson and the Scott family. Eagles lose hard fought game to businessmen The quintet of Bowling Green Business University won a hard fought game from Tennessee Tech’s five by a one point margin. The score being 30 to 29. The first half of the game was a little slow but through the entire last half it was not known whether either team had the edge on the other, as both teams were playing a rapid game. It was not until the time whistle ended the game that the spectators or team knew which would win. Vaughn was the high scorer of the game, he looped 19 of Tech 29 points. Line up T. P. I. B. G. B. U. Vaughn F Perisho Evans F Stamper Winningham C Williams Robbins G Lewis R. Evans G Weems Subs, Tech: Cobb, Johnson Referee: Smith Advertising is the life of trade and the death of failure. Music Notes The chapel hour Wednesday of last week and Thursday of this week was given to Miss Stanton, who arranged some very interesting programs. On Wednesday, the program consisted of: Piano solo: Minuet Paderewski Virginia Wilcox Vocal Solo: Where my Caravan has Rested A Garden Romance – Beulah Allison Saxophone Solos: Selection from “The Mikado” Toddling Sax –Lauren O’Dell On Thursday morning the following program was given: Reading –“Home Sweet Home” O’dell Cornwell Vocal Solos: “By the Water of Minnesota” --Cadman “Spring Fancy –Denmore --Daninie Wright Jarvis. New Books for Library The following books were added to the library last week: “Far From the Maddening Crowd” by Thomas Hardy. “The Choir Invisible” by James Lane Allen “In the Tennessee Mountains” by Charles Egbert Craddock “The Black Tulip” by Alexander Dumas. “The Marble Faun” by Natahniel Hawthorne “The Appreciation of Art” by Eugen Newhaus “Great Artists and Their Work” by Alfred Mansfield Brooks “Democracy and the Party System” by Osthogorski “Hand Andy” by Samuel Lover “Ninety-Three” by Victor Hugo “Shirely” by Charlotte Bronte Everybody Wants to Attend College “More and more students in our colleges” –year after year the Boston Transcript’s annual survey of college education has brought forth this hackedneyed statement. This year it is revised. Now, “everybody wants to go to college.” Approximately 750,000 young people are now attending colleges in the United States. Many statistics will follow, the transcript announces, of which a good percentage, it is hoped, will prove illuminating; but none will there be more indicative of current conditions in the realm of American higher education than these: Only thirteen in 10,000 of the population of France and only fifteen in 10,000 of the population of the British Ilses are found in the universities of those countries; there were in our colleges and universities during 1923 about 600,000 students, or about sixty in 10,000 of the population of this country. --New Student. Locals Several former Tech students will present at the Valentine party given Saturday evening, February 12, by the Belles Lettres and Sherwood Literary Societies. The following T. I. I. students spent the week-end away: Arlie Moss – Chattanooga Hugh Butler –Celina Milard Gates –Celina Willie Cherry–Celina A.C. Willis –Spencer Henry Chapman –Spencer Pearle Cornwall –Nashville Ann Elizabeth Bracey –Nashville Eugene Collier –Nashville Mr. and Mrs. Smith Entertain Faculty. The faculty of T. P. I and their wives were delightfully entertained at the home of Acting President A.W. Smith and Mrs. Smith on Monday evening, February 14. The Valentine idea was carried out in the decorations, amusements, and refreshments. Seven tables of progressive rook were played, Mrs. Pinkerton receiving the prize, a lovely handkerchief. For the highest score. Mr J.M. Hatfield was the winner of a contest, due to his proficiency in forestry. The faculty appreciated the counesy extended them by Mr. and Mrs. Smith, as this was the first opportunity they had had of getting together. News Items At a meeting of the State Board of Education on February 11, $400 was appropriated for the purchase of a large motor driven lawn mower for use on the campus and athletic field. Mr. Austin W. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Pinkerton, and Miss Oliver attended the Teachers Meeting at Smithville last Saturday, where Mr. Smith addressed the teachers of Dekalb Count. Miss Eunice Allen, Miss Brownie Renfore, Miss Lilah Hembree, and Mr. Z. I. Beachboard, members of the faculty of the Smithville Highschool, were here for the game between the Smithville girls and T.P.I. Prep girls. Mrs. Chas. Cooper was president at the chapel hour Wednesday morning and sang three numbers which were very much enjoyed by the student body. Prep Beats Baxter in First Game In a game marred by unusual roughness and a great number of fouls. T.P.I. preps defeated the Baxter seminary 30 to 22 one night last week in the City school gyms. The preps led through the game by a small margin, but it looked as if the Baxterians would go ahead several times. Neville for Baxter was the high scorer. He basketed 8 field goals. McDonald for the Preps. Was successful in ringing the bell five times for 2 points each and one free goal. Line Up Preps Baxter McDonald F Puckett Greenwood F Boyd Moore C Neville Cobb G Lynn Rich G Brown Subs: Preps, Robbins Baxter –Jones, Jaquess Love Love is a native of the rocks, Of briery paths and stony places: She has no bond with men who wear The placid mask of happy faces; She favors not the glittering court, Its ennui- nor its gaudy graces-.L-. Love dwells among the weathered rocks. Of the wind-swept and silent spaces. Love cohabits with the winds That swirl in elemental fury Above the earth and when she sends Her challenge to a tired heart, weary With the quiet tenor of its way, Her mandate is so softly spoken It reeks not of the price to pay, Nor counts the hearts already broken. 0, yes! Love dwells among the rocks, Her haven is the unseen places Where God meets god and stars in flocks A- cruising go through empty spaces. And she is king and she is queen To fits of despotism given And through her scepter is unseen It rules the earth as well as heaven --Vadus Carmack It is a striking coincidence that American ends in “I Can.” The Luck of Having a Job Good luck is the twin brother of hard work, while hard luck is a close relative of laziness. Luck dreams of a dollar, work earn it. Luck pictures a home, while work builds it. Luck takes a nap, while brains are winning points. Trusting to luck is fishing with an empty hook. The map who relies on luck is lucky if he keeps out of the poor house. True luck means rising at six in the morning—out on the floor before the alarm clock stops. Living on a dollar if you earn two. Minding your own business. Noticing your own faults as closely as you do your neighbor’s. It means appointments you never failed to keep, trains you never failed to catch, the opportunities you did not miss. I’ve noticed, too, that bad luck and an unguarded tongue often go together. Then, too, the victim of bad luck is often incapable of team work. That handicaps him from taking part in the big Games. Good fortune is the accident that befalls the fit. There isn’t much perversity of events. The buttered side down of ill luck happens because it is the buttered side. Everything hits the sore spot, but not more than any other. One finds what he is looking for, and all things rush to the service of him who knows how to use them. Our successes are at least collaterally incident to our attempts. We meet casually some day the very mood for which we long have waited. If we carry a botany box of observation we shall gather many specimens. Into the magazine of the eager mind the spark of incident will inevitably drop. Joseph was a “lucky fellow,’ but part of his good luck was that he had an opportunity of demonstrating his fitness for doing large things by his faithfulness to small ones. He had the luck of being a servant. That was his chance. Every fellow who has a job has a chance. Don’t think for a moment that things went smooth and without opposition at the court of Pharahb. There were palace intrifues and high offcials who tried to knife him in the dark. Any man who tries to strike twele finds a dozen hands reaching for the muffler. When ou are at the bottom lots of folks at you on the head and say, “Poor dog! You deserve better,” but start bravely upward and the crowd haunts a rock to hurl at “such an upstart.” News From Other Colleges A student’s organization of Buenos Aires sent a telegram of congratulation to senator Borah expressing gratitude at his “defense of Nicaragua,” and for showing the people in the United States the “true situation.” In Mexico City an association of Central Americans to boycott American goods until the Marines are withdrawn from Nicaragua is being led by Juan Mella, a Cuban student. The association has already sent telegrams to American political leaders’ demanding the withdrawal of American troops. A national Union of Canadian students may be formed, similar to the National Union of England and Wales, the “Confederation Internationale des Etudiantes” of Europe and the National Student Federation of America. Representatives of eleven Canadian colleges and universities met in Montreal during the Christmas vacation to decide whether the project is feasible. In the West Canadian colleges fell an especial need for this union. The “better understanding” which a union would bring about is wanted in these institutions which are at present practically isolated from the rest of the Dominion. The situation is somewhere better in the East, because of an Intercollegiate Union. More than 1,000 persons attended the annual short course for farm people at Albama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn. Sixty countries of the 67 in Albama were represented. Teachers to the number of 114 from British overseas dominions, Canada, Australia, South Africa, and New Zealand, are teaching this year in schools of Great Britain, and the same number of teachers from England and Scotland have gone to replace them temporarily, under the plan for teacher exchange arranged by the British League of Empire. Sherwoods The Sherwood Literary Society met in its regular meeting room on February 14, and rendered the following program: Devotional—Chaplain Debate: Resolved that Japanese and Chinese should be admitted to United States citizenship Affirmative Negative Clyde McDonald Joe McClain Jasper Harp Homer Gates Declamation –Olin Carr. Jokes—Guy Boyd. The negative were successful in obtaining a favorable report from the judges. The affirmative speakers proved that they were competent of consideration as debaters. There were no vacant seats in our meeting room and several of the members were required to stand. Come on, Sherwoods, and let’s make it 100 per cent next time. J.L. Myers made a peppy speech which brought us to a realization of our duty in Society. Dr. Sheeley Here on Feb. 22 On February 22 Dr. F.N. Seerly of New York will be at the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute to speak to students. He comes under the auspices of the Young Men’s Chstian Association and will spend the day in conferences with various groups. Those who remember Dr. Hall who was here a few years ago will look forward to Dr. Seerley’s visit, as his work is similar to that of Dr. Hall. Cumberland University Falls Before T.P.I. Shift their combination as they would and battle to the end as they did, Cumberland University’s Bulldogs were unable to match goals with T.P.I. Golden Eagles, and went down in defeat by 26 to 22 in the Cumberland gym. The constant swapping of the Bulldogs made a good game of one which otherwise probably would have been mediocre. It was a constant repetition of the things all the way. The Eagles would bring the ball up the floor and one of the TPI’s sharpshooters, would pitch a goal and the Bulldogs would slip in and fight their way back up the court and flip in a counter. Things went evenly at times but usually the Eagles kept five or six points in the lead. It was a hard game for the Bulldogs to drop, more so for the reason that Coach Knee thinks his superior to those of TPI Seven Bulldogs saw service, while Coach Overall used but five men. Try as they might, the Lebanons could not find a smooth working combination. Line Up Ten Tech Cumberland H. Evans F Fitts Vaughn F Martin Moss G Robinson Robbins G Goodman Winningham G Hicks Subs: Cumberland Drescall, Layman Importance of Brood Sow on Farm Donald Moore There is no other animal department of the farm that is of more importance than a good brood sow. The farm that keeps a brood sow does not have to depend on the meat market for its meat supply. The cook only goes to the smokehouse without her purse, and not even realizing how much she gets. The farm is looking for cash income; nothing will come nearer filling this demand than a sow. A quick turn-over of feed is realized and usually a nice profit is made. The sow utilizes all garbage such as: skim-milk, buttermilk, kitchen slop, etc., also eats refused feed, and other products from the garden that would otherwise go to waste. The hogs, if the farmer desired, will gather and market his crops. The necessity of pasture for hogs will force the farmer to plant legumes and cover crops, which will be indirectly a great benefit to the farmer. The farm that keeps a sow has available an even supply of quality feeders at all times. The farm that does not have a brood sow on it can easily see where it is losing money both directly and indirectly. Belle Lettres and Sherwoods Sponder Valentine Party A delightful social event of the winter term was the Valentine party given Saturday night Feb. 12 in the TPI auditorium. The room was decorated with red and white crepe peper streamers and hearts. Streamer of paper led from each window to large red heart in the center of the room. The lights were shaded with red paper giving a radiant effect. Games were played in the gymnasium and contests were enjoyed in the auditorium. The ones receiving prizes were Mrs. A.W. Smith, Mayme Gipson and Homer Gates, Jessie Barnes Johnny Bilbrey, Mary Frances Whitson and Harry Burrows. Refreshments were served from the library. The menu included, Heart sandwiches hipolite and cherry sandwiches, Heart mints, nuts in red meat cups and coffee. The chaperones were Mr. and Mrs. Lane, Mr. Lane being Sponsor of the Belles Lettres and Mr. and Mrs. Hatfield. Mr. Hatfield being the Sherwood Sponsor. Other members of the faculty enjoyed the occasion. Because chapel groups hear prominent speakers number barely enough to start a good basketball game and because voluntary chapel means to most a permanent excused absence, the Richmond collegian, University of Richmond Virginia pleads for the return of compulsory services. You can be successful in boosting your town, but don’t try to shove it. Meeting of Alumni executive council (continued from page 1) Were authorized to write the Senator Hensley and Representative Anderson in the name of the Association, asking them to support the Appropriation Bill for this institution which is before the Legislature. Interesting Chapel Address The students of TPI were again fortunate in having Dr. TC. Crume, the evangelist from Kentucky, to speak to them the second at the chapel last Friday. Dr. Crume’s subject was “success” and he made a very inspiring talk. Practically all the students took notes and Dr. Crume has offered a copy of his book, “Evangelism in Action” to the student who will send him the best outlines of both the addresses which he has delivered to the students. He has also presented a copy of this book to the school library and the students appreciate it very much.

1926 January 20

  Girls’ Basketball Tournament February 24, 25, 26,1927 T.P.I. vs. Castle Heights, Tuesday Night, Feb. 15 Societies prepare for debate Question: “Resolved, That Labor Unions as they exist, are on a whole beneficial to the American people.” The century-old labor question will again be brought into forensic prominence at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute this year when the representatives of the Sherwood and Upper Cumberland Literary Societies meet in the annual intersociety debate on April 8th. The question as submitted by the Sherwoods to the Upper Cumberlands on last Tuesday reads as follows: Resolved: That labor unions, as they now exist, are on the whole beneficial to the American people.” The Upper Cumberland Representatives will announce their choice of sides of the question on February 10th. The Sherwoods will be represented by Stanley Carr, of Livingston, and Leonard Crawford, of Baxter. While the Upper Cumberlands are basing their hopes for victory on Robert Smith, of Winchester, and Paul Moore of Cookeville, Route 6. A loving cup is offered the winning team by Womack Drug Co. The society winning the cup three years in succession retains it as a permanent trophy. Home Economics Club Organized The students of the Home Economics department met and organized a home Economics Club. The purpose of which is to further the development of this department at T.P.I. and affiliation with the State organization, so as to better the conditions and increase the efficiency of the work throughout the state. Regular meetings will be held under the supervision of Miss Rose and Miss Johnson. The officers elected were as follows: President: Rebecca Johnson Vice-President: Eleanor Haile Secretary: Mary Della Pointer Treasurer: Jonny Bilbrey Spring Quarter Opens Mar. 14, instead of Mar. 4 An error was made in the general catalogue of the school concerning the date of the opening of the spring quarter, which will be on March 14 and not on March 4 as printed in the catalogue. Some additional instructors will be added to the faculty and several new classes will be organized at that time. A large number of new students are expected both at the beginning of the spring quarter and the spring short term, which will be on April 26. “Be an Optimist” A Great Success On January 28th, at the City School Auditorium, the Sherwoods and Belles Lettres Literary Societies gave the Baker royalty play, “Be an Optimist.” In spite of the rainy weather, there was a large and appreciative audience present. The play is dedicated by the author to “everyone, everywhere who is considered a grouch.” The many complimentary statements received by the young people who were in the play made them feel that they had a done a splendid service in removing any tinge of grouchiness that may have existed in the minds of those present. They appreciate the many congratulations they have received on the manner in which the various parts were presented. The characters were as follows: Isaac Golditch: Leonard Crawford Beck, His Daughter: Alberta Cassety Jimmy Maynard: W.B. Murphy Mrs. Clinton: Lena Breeding Mike: Hollis Ours Ray Hudson: Harry Burrows Miss Hull: Edith Gentry Maggie: Vallie Huddleston Ethel Peabody: Hazel Swafford Spencer: Paul Tidwell Madame Goopher: Ruth Weaver Direcotrs, J.M. Hatfield and J.E. Lane; chairman of publicity and business arrangements, Lester King; costume committee, Treva Cooper, Maurine Quarles. Palladians Entertained One of the most delightful social events of the season was that participated in by the Palladian society at the home of Miss Shelia Officer. Miss Officer, assisted by Misses Rebecca Johnson, Eleanor Haile, Elise Young, and Jessie Barnes entertained the members of the Palladian society with a card party on Saturday, January 29th, from three to five o’clock. Both were progressive bridge and rook were played, with Miss Mary Francis Whitson winning the prize for highest score in bridge, and Miss Virginia Wilcox for the highest score in rook. Delicious refreshments were served at the close of the afternoon by the charming hostesses. The party was heartily enjoyed by all. Moon-light cabaret minstrel Sponsored by football letter men and directed by Mr. T.W. Kittrell. Practice begun last Monday night January 3lst, on the Moonlight Cabaret Minstrel that is being sponsored by the football letter men. This Minstrel is being given to raise money with which to give each letter man a nice sweater. If you like a dry, uninteresting play, don’t see this Minstrel; but if you have good sides that can stand lots of laughter, don't fail to be there. The Minstrel book is a 1926 edition and this guarantees a new set of jokes. We are very fortunate in securing a very able director in the person of Mr. T. W. Kittrell. Mr. Kittrell as everyone knows, has had much experience in directing plays and al— ways makes them a great success. The following characters make up the cast: Director: Mr. Kitrell Interlocutor: B.M. Carr Sam: Oyama Winningham Melancholy: Robert Smith Pete: Gradis Winningham Jolly: Sewell Brown Buck: Merrill Hughes Clarence: Stanley Carr We promise you a good time, and we believe that you will get your money’s worth. The date and the price of admission will be announced soon. Watch for them. Be present, enjoy yourself, and help a good cause. Burritt College Co-Eds defeated by Tech Girls The Burritt Highlanders went back to the hills the other night following a humiliating defeat handed them by the Eagle Co-Eds, 45 to 2 on the local gym floor. The Preps also contributed their part of the big Tech night by winning with as much ease from Celina. High School to the tune of 45 to 22. There was very little out of the ordinary about the game itself. Had the Highlanders played a little better or the Eagles played a little worse, it might have been an exciting game, but as it was, we can only say that it was one of those uninteresting runaways. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Burritt Thompson F. Northcutt A.P. Whitson F. Bell L. Whitson C. Simrell Hale G. Johnson Moore G. Drake Substitutes: Tech-Watson, Jared, M.F. Whitson, Whitaker, McCormick Burritt – Acuff Cumberland loses to Tech 28-18 Speed of Tech Co-eds make Cumberland Five Appear Slow. It was evident from the first few minutes of play that the visitors did not have a ghost of a chance, but the Co-Eds from Lebanon kept at it and gave the gallery something good to watch at different times during the struggle. They were obviously suffering from too much and too hard basketball squeezed into too few nights. The game was far different from the great runaway that the locals staged against Burritt College just a few nights before, but they had in their possession a decided margin on the score board all during the scrap. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Cumberland Thompson F. Whitlock A.P. Whitson F. Alexander L. Whitson C. Vaughn Moore G. Smartt Hale G. Stockton Substitutes: Tech-Watson. Second game McDonald F. Sedwell Moore F. Wendell Greenwood C. Davis Matheney G. Hahnan Rich G. Gates Substitutes: Tech-Robbins, Cobb. Dr. Crume Makes Talk in Chapel On Thursday morning, January 27th, Rev. Sam Edwards and Dr. T.C. Crume, who is conducting a revival at the Baptist church, were present at the chapel exercises. Dr. Crume made a splendid talk on“Making Good in Life," which was enjoyed very much by the students. We were indeed fortunate to have a man of Dr. Crume's ability to visit our school and to give us such an interesting talk. Valentine Party On Saturday evening, February 12th, the Belle Lettres and Sherwood Literary Societies will give their annual Valentine Party for the student body. Elaborate plans are being made for entertainment and each and every student is promised an evening full of pleasure. B. G. B. U. Takes Victory from Take One could travel many a mile in any direction from any given point without seeing a slower game than the one between Bowling Green Business University and Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Both teams labored under the handicap of it being a warm night, but it was, no doubt, Tech's night off. They would work the ball down the floor, through the scanty defense of the Businessmen and then miss a crip shot. The Eagles held the visitors very. Well during the first quarter but after that they simply couldn’t hit the hoops. They had all the breaks against them, too. Time and again the oval rolled around the loop, only to fall over the wrong side. Too, a number of personals were called on the locals and most of the free throws were made good by the visitors. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. B.G.B.U H. Evans F. Sledge Robbins F. Perisho Moss C. Williams Watson G. Weems Winningham G. Seale Substitutes: Tech – K. Evans (1), Jobe B.G.B.U. – Lewis, Stamper. Tech Preps Lose to Livigston The Livingston Academy basketball team defeated the Tech Preps 22 to 18, in the former gym, about a week ago. The Preps played ruggedly due to the lack of intensive practice. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Livingston Vaughn F. Stonecipher McDonald F. Speck Moore C. H.Hinds Matheney G. Bone Rich G. D. Hinds Substitutes: Tech – Cobbs, Robbins Prep Girls Trim Carthage Displaying the same team work that has featured their play all season, the Prep girls continued their winning pace by defeating Carthage High, 47 to 7. The Preps took the lead at the beginning of the game and were never checked. Good passing and excellent teamwork featured the victory for the locals. Thompson, Jared and A. P. Whitson almost shared equal on the offensive plays. Carthage fought hard during the entire game but went unrewarded. In fact the defense of the Preps was so good that they only shot at the goal three times during the first quarter. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Carthage Thompson F. Jenkins Jared F. Hughes A.P. Whitson C. Malone McCormick G. Armistead M.F. Whitson G. Webb Substitutes: Tech – Reagan, White, Starnes. Lebanon Five Beats T.P.I. Castle Heights ran roughshod over T.P.I. in their gym Saturday night, 35 to 14. The cadets took an early lead and at the end of the first half were leading 18 to 7. Burns for the winners, was the high scorer of the game. Robbins led the scoring for the Eagles. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Heights H. Evans F. J. Martin Robbins F. T. Martin Moss C. Burns Watson G. Haley Winningham G. Dawson Substitutes: Tech – Vaughn, Cobb, K. Evans Castle Heights – Wood Algood Club The Algood boys and girls true to their home town tradition, form a band of united workers who loyally and faithfully enter into every duty that devolves upon them. This group of ten have organized into a club and elected as their officers the following. President: Jasper Harp Vice-President: Mary Della Pointer Secretary: Henry Mallory Treasurer: Odell Cornwell Senior College Class The Senior College Class were in charge of Chapel exercises Friday, January 21st. The program was planned to commemorate the life of one of the South’s greatest heroes, Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson. Because of a visiting minister, Rev. B. T. Watson, only one of the numbers was given, this being a splendid talk on the “The Life and Work on Jackson” by Mr. Benton Carr. Everyone expressed their appreciation by the splendid applause. College students have access to art collections Art loan collections valued at $100,000 for use in teaching art will be sent by the Carnegie Corporation of New York to 20 colleges in the United States and Canada. The collections consist of 1,800 reproductions in photograph and color facsimiles of the greatest works in architecture, sculpture, and painting; 50 original prints representing different processes and schools from the sixteenth century to the present; a set of textiles in 35 pieces illustrating materials and designs of different races and ages; and 200 books, many of which are rare volumes in French and German, as well as English, on the art of every period and people. Cabinets have been provided for the sets and a catalouge prepared giving a description of each piece in the collection. Seventeen colleges in the United States, representing 13 different States and 3 colleges in Canada, are the beneficiaries. All of them are smaller colleges without heavy endowments and located in places not easily accessible to metropolitan centers. Cooperative plan involves half-year alternations One semester each year for three years is spent in an industry as nearly allied as possible to their chosen line of work by students in the department of engineering at the College of the Pacific, Stockton, Calif. During the fifth year students remain continuously in college. This is said to be the only college west of the Mississippi following the co-operative plan of instruction, under which students are enabled, after the freshman year, to gain valuable first-hand experience in the work they expect to follow as a profession and at the same time to support themselves while attending college. College Friendship College friendship is a deep, quiet, enduring affection for our college association. It is affection arising from mutual esteem and good will. College friendship is essential to a successful college career, for the more friends we have in college, the more we get out of college life. It is the desire of every college student to become as popular as possible with his college friends. Popularity, being based upon friendship, depends upon the number and kind of friends we acquire. College life would be a drudgery if it were not for the friendship we establish. If knowledge was the only thing we could get at college, many students would drop out, or not even start to college that would otherwise graduate. Friendship when once established is hard to destroy. It is something you can not loose, nor can it be taken from you so long as there is mutual esteem and good will existing. A large part of our education comes through our college associates. By discussing a topic with one or more college friends we get their views, and thereby broaden our own conception. There are many ways in which we can develop friendship while in college. We can develop it by trying to appear pleasant at all times, regardless of the state of mind. Also by participating in athletics, musical clubs, dramatic clubs, college journalism, class social events, literary societies, alumni associations, and any other organization or function connected with college life. There are many religious organizations in which we may make friends, friends that are worthwhile. Friendship is one of the greatest acquirements during college life. While in college we make friends that will last throughout life. We meet the people that we will expect to help us in the time of need, and those to whom we will render aid. These are the people which we will always cherish. A student goes to college to acquire training in leadership which better enables him to render efficient service to society. Leadership is developed, principally through friendship, therefore the greater friendship is developed in an individual, the more service he is capable of rendering to society. There is nothing that will promote and increase a student’s love for his Alma Mater more than college friendship. It is not, necessarily, the college that holds a warm place in a college man's heart. It is the college friends, and sweet memories that composes the Alma Mater. There is nothing more satisfactory to an Alumnus than to relate the cherished memories of his college friends, and his Alma Mater. Many times positions are obtained through college friendship. A college graduate, when selecting some one to hold a responsible position, over which he has charge, will usually select an old college friend, because he has been tried, and he knows what his friend is capable of doing. The friendship of no one is more desirable than that of a college man, because he is to become a leader in society, a man among men, in the near future. Some of Tech’s Friends I take this means and opportunity of expressing the appreciation of the 1927 Eagle Staff to our friends who have purchased advertising space in “The Eagle.” They merit the patronage not only of our student body, but that of all friends of Tennessee Tech. Those who have reserved space to date are as follows: Williams &' Terry Bros, Jere Whitson Hardware Co, Maddux & Proffitt, Citizens Bank, Cookeville Motor Co., “33" Service Station, Murray Ball, Jewler, Womack Drug Co., Herald Publishing Co.. Gainesboro Telephone Co., Crawford Motor Co., First National Bank, Lassater & Carr, H. 8. H. West Side Drug Co., Royal Cafe, Jenkins & Darwin Bros, T. Robbins, Pressing Shop, Shanks Hotel, ]. A. Isbell, Ragland. Potter & C0., Cookeville Marble Works, Brown Shoe Shop, Apple's Place, Barnes & Clark., Ohero-Cola Bottling Co., Crawford 8: Bates Café, Sam Pendergrass Hardware Co., Coca-Cola Bottling Co, Model Laundry, T. P. I. Café, Clark Shoe Shop, Menzies Shoe Co., Baxter Seminary, Tennessee Central Railway, I. L. Loftis & Co.. The Harding Studio, Tech’s advertisers are “Tech’s, Friends.” Patronize your friends. B. M. CARR, Editor. Y.M.C.A The Y.M.C.A. met in regular meeting room Wednesday evening, January 26th, and enjoyed a most delightful program. Each man took part in the discussion with zeal. The program was as follows: School-days: Wallace Mitchell Childhood Friends: Robert Smith School-day: Wallace Mitchell College friends: Paul Moore Friends in Life: B.M. Carr There has been good attendance at the Y.M. meetings, but there are men in the “halls” who should be in the Y.M. Come next Wednesday evening and help us while we help you make the best of our time. Upper Cumberland Literary Society The Upper Cumberlands are working hard to win the Wilson Banner this year, and furthered their plans by electing Paul Moore and Robert Smith the debaters, to defend the Black and Gold, with Benton Carr and James Carlen as alternates. Both debaters are experienced debaters and the society is looking forward to a winning team. The play “Be An Optimist" given by the .Sherwood and Belles Lettres was enjoyed and appreciated by the Upper Cumberlands and we wish to congratulate the societies and more especially the cast for their splendid performance, and we hope to help further this program by presenting, with the assistance of our sister society, a play in March. Watch Oracle for announcements. Making the Assembly Hour Interesting There is one particular form of sport that seems to be especially attractive to the students in this college; it is that of cutting assembly. So pleasant is this diversion that dire threats and unpleasant publicity are called into use as a means of preventing such untoward behavior on the part of the students in general. I am wondering if in this case cure might not be better than prevention and may we not suggest that with a little forethought on the part of somebody in the planning of assembly programs they might be made so interesting that the enjoyment gained from being at assembly would overbalance that derived from being absent, thus taking from the precedent established by the school authorities. In other words, speaking in the language of the teaching profession, the work should be made so interesting that the students will want to get it instead of punishing them for not wanting to get it as it is. The student goes to assembly after two hours of intensive concentration on work requiring the greatest mental effort. Following assembly he again takes up work of the same nature for another two hours, before the time comes for any break in his work. Viewing it in this light would it not be wise to make the assembly period one more or less of a recreational nature, thus giving an opportunity for relaxation from the strain of the regular class work. Physiologists agree that inhaling fresh air is one of the best ways to refresh a tired mind or body; therefore the assembly room should be well ventilated, It should be the special duty of some one to see that this is taken care of. Singing is one of the best methods of getting this fresh air into our lungs and is a good form of exercise as well, and is also one of the best forms of relaxation. Hence would it not be a good idea to devote a greater part of the period to singing than has previously been done. There is nothing that any group enjoys more than peppy enthusiastic singing in which each one may take part. The assembly program should also be of an inspirational nature and after a few minutes of relaxation a well -planned devotional exercise would mean much to the student body; an exercise into which the one in charge had put some original thought bringing out something different from the subject-matter presented in the class room. This would mean of course that upon some one would devolve the responsibility of seeing that every assembly program was definitely provided for with a leader in charge and that leader notified in time to allow him time for special preparation, If the student does not feel that he is getting enough from the assembly programs at present to justify his attendance, he should feel some responsibility in improving them. The primary object of all clubs, societies and other organized groups on the campus should be to minister to the college life in general. What greater service could any organization render than that of presenting an assembly program that would give enjoyment and inspiration to the entire school? Let’s get busy with our special programs then, and with faculty and student body working together let’s make the assembly hour the most outstanding hour in the day. Why shouldn’t it be? It is the one hour when the entire college gets together. When this improvement has been accomplished we will no longer hear the low rumble of criticism that is now leveled against assembly by the student body in general and the monitors can throw away their little white cards and enjoy the hour with the others. – Chalk Line Agriculture Department From time to time articles will appear on subjects based on the study of Agriculture. This is the second of this series and from them we get an idea of many practical things studied in the Agricultural Department. Clean Milk and Pure Milk Milk may be clean and yet not be pure. To obtain clean milk the following precautions should be observed: First, to have a well ceiled .barn to prevent dust and other flying things from entering the milk While milking; second, to keep the barn well bedded with dry bedding; third, brush the cow and clean the udder with a damp cloth before milking; fourth, a thorough process of cleaning the vessels that are to contain the milk; fifth, to strain immediately after milking through a brass wire strainer of not more than fifty meshes to the inch and three or four thicknesses of loosely woven cotton or woolen cloth. The vessels that it is strained in should be closed well. As far as looks are concerned the above described milk would be alright for use, but it may not be pure These further precautions should be taken to make the milk pure: First, to test the cows for diseases; second, to wash the utensils with hot alkali water, and if possible expose to sunlight two or three hours; third, pasteurize to kill germs. This is done by heating to 155 degrees F. for fifteen minutes and quickly cooling to 50 degrees F. This will not develop a boiled taste. It should be of interest to the dormitory students to know that the milk supply for the lining hall comes from a source where the rules to obtain clean and pure milk are observed. Virginia Offers Extension Teaching In Citizenship Citizenship instruction, through single lectures or short courses, is announced by the University of Virginia Assistance in arranging citizenship institutes is also offered local communities or organizations by the bureau of citizenship education of the university, which will furnish information on any subject in the field of citizenship and government. A short-course meeting presents popular demand in connection with the proposed reorganization in Virginia of State and local governments, embraces a general study of city, county, and State government, and includes public health, education, public welfare, and other activities in which there is State and local co—operation. Lectures will be arranged to suit local convenience, the only expense being for travel and maintenance of the lecturer while absent from the university. Suggested Gifts for Brides Patent snore silencer and romance preserver. Dictograph for recording sleep mutterings. A self-reducer for household bills. Electric Searchlight for use in pocket larceny. Box of chalk for drawing the line. Rock crusher for biscuits. – Exchange. Letter Found by Janitor While Archie, the janitor, was cleaning the rooms at Springbrook during the holidays, he ran across a letter. It was addressed to Mr. Leonard Miller, and read as follows:“My Dearest Leonard: “I said I’d never come back, but here I am.” You know that ”I shouldn‘t mind if you find someone new.” “But I do, you know I do.” Leonard, “I'd climb the highest mountain,” if I knew I’d find you there “sitting on top of the world.” "All alone,” I’ll go where you go and do what you do, “as long as I have you." “So how come you do me like you do?" For ”I love you truly," Lew, and “I’m sorry I made you cry” “all through the night." “But what can I do after I say I’m sorry}? “Dear heart I’ll see you in my dreams,” and “Memories" of “The hours I spent with thee,” make me wonder“where my baby is tonight.” “Sweetheart,” “I wish you were jealous of me,” “as jealous as I am of you,”“Because" it makes me “Angry” to think that you may be “Cheatin’ On-Me,” “My Own” where we have “a cottage small by a waterfall,” “then I’ll be happy," and “at peace with the word.” “Honest and truly," “I love you dear,” “but if you love me I’ll never cry,” so Black-bird, By-Bye. Farewell to thee “Till we meet again.” Thy Own, “Little" Lucy. —The Broadcaster. “Why do people cheat on exams?” Because they hate to “flunk out.” That is such an illogical way of reasoning. A degree is a proof of a person’s having passed successfully certain subjects. If you receive a degree and are a hopeless ignoramus, you become a laughing stock. It is better to know nothing with no pretensions than to pretend knowledge that you do not possess. “Cheating on exams isn’t clever; it is dishonest. To steal another’s brain work is as dishonest as stealing his books. When a paper is handed in the pupil. Whose name is signed to it is swearing that the work is wholly his own. A pledge is superficial—a person who signs h 3 name has signed the best pledge he can. Giving help is as bad as receiving, if not worse. There is a double weight of dishonor on the giver—his own and that of the receiver, who could not cheat even if he wanted to without the giver. “Cheating on exams is the most cowardly of all thefts because it involves the most inordinate of all human instincts, personal pride. The cheaters want to get something for nothing. They hate to fail an exam, regardless of the fact that they have made no preparation, because they hate to make a low grade when their classmates make “A.” They are ashamed to make “F" because others will find out, but they aren’t ashamed to look over a student’s shoulder and “copy." These people can see only as far as their noses—they cannot see how momentary weakness leads to genuine dishonesty. College age is too late to cure the cheating disease. It is a mental habit that grows by leaps and bounds when endured. The Dean’s solution—to expel those who are caught cheating—is about the only course to be followed. It may not eliminate cheating, but it will help rid the school of cheaters. This measure that provides two chances .for an offender is both wise and lenient. Stressing the point may make the practice less common, and people may see the error of their ways and mend them accordingly."—The University Echo. FINALE The longest trail has somewhere its ending; The sweetest day has its twilight of gall, When the Star of our hopes into darkness descending Fades and leaves but the black and the pall. The longest river finds somewhere its ocean; The tallest peak finds somewhere the sky. The sublimes faith and a whole heart’s devotion In the ultimate crux may perish and die. The rarest of flowers has its day of decaying, When its gospel of Beauty no longer it flings To the breeze, and its wilted petals are saying: “We’re dead—but we want no angel wings!” ——Vadus Carmack Tote Fair There’s an awful lot of happiness In this old world I find, If we think well of other folks And treat ’em middlin’ kind. If we meet and everywhere, We do the best we can There's a heap of satisfaction In just “toting fair.” There’s a powerful lot of gladness In being true to men, In carryin’ out your promises Every time—and when They don’t seem to appreciate it— Why, don’t you never care, You’re more ahead than they are By just “toting fair.” There’s rules' and regulations For being happy here But honest, you don’t need them And don't you never fear— You’ll be happy and contented If you treat your neighbor square, For the best way to be happy Is to just “tote fair." ——George P. Kissberger. Formal Instruction for Deans of Women Special course for training advisers of girls and cleans of women have been established in at least 24 higher institutions in the United States, as shown by a survey conducted by the National Association of Deans of Women. Courses vary somewhat in the different institutions. In 10 institutions courses in relation to the high school only are available; in 6, courses in relation to higher educational institutions as well as to high schools are offered. In others the particular field of interest was not stated. The dean of women is the instructor in charge in nearly all the institutions, and replies from 19, indicate that credit of from one to six semester hours is granted. From 50 to 70 pupils a year receive scholarships from the Nicaraguan Government for education in foreign countries, principally in the United States. Jokes Mr. Parsons: “When was Rome built?” Flop Tallent: “At night." Mr. Passons: “Who told you that?” Flop: “You did. You said Rome wasn’t built in a day.” A bright—eyed, shabby little fellow was working his way thru a Crowded street car selling his papers. A white—haired old gentleman seemed interested in the boy, and questioned him about his way of living and his earnings. It appeared that there was a young brother to be supported. “Jimmie is lame and can’t earn much himself," said the boy. "Ah, I see," said the gentleman“That makes it hard. You could do better alone.” The shabby little figure was erect in an instant, and the denial was both prompt and indignant. “No I couldn’t," replied the boy. "Jim's someone to go home to. He’s lots of help. What would be the good of having luck if nobody Was glad? Or of getting things if there was nobody to divide with?” “Fourteenth street!" called the conductor, and as the newsboy jumped out into the gathering dusk, the old gentleman remarked to nobody in particular: “I've heard many a poorer sermon than that.” An absent-minded man was strap hanging in a tram car. He swayed to and fro and finally the conductor said to him, “Can I help you, sir?” "Yes," said the man, ”hold onto this strap while I get my fare out.” Mable Matheny: “Sometimes you appear so manly, and sometimes you are effeminate. How do you account for it?” Willis Huddleston: "I suppose it is heredity. Half of my ancestors were men, and the other half were women." Servant: “The doctor’s here, sir.” Absent-Minded Prof: “I can’t see him. Tell him I’m sick.” Clerk: “The customer asks if this shirt will shrink?” Ikey: “Does it fit him?” Clerk: “No, it’s a size too large.” Ikey: Sure, of course it shrinks.” How much did Philadelphia, Pa ? How much did Cleveland, O.? How many eggs could New Orleans, La? Whose grass did Joplin, Mo? What was it made Chicago, Ill.? Twas Washington, D. C? She would Tacoma, Wash, in spite of a Baltimore, M. D,? You call Minneapolis, Minn.? Why not Annapolis, Ann.? If you can't bet the reason why I bet Topeka, Kan? Who was it lent Nashville, Tenn, when he was nearly broke? Could Noah build a Little Rock, Ark., if-he had no Guthrie, Ok.? Would Denva, Colo. cop because Ottumwa. la., dore? For tho my Portland, Me., did love, I threw my Portland, Ore. “Is Johnny’s new dog a setter or a pointer?” “He’s neither. He’s an upsetter and a disappointment.” If we were asked what it is the most taxed thing in the world, our first guess would be – a mothers patience. “Oh, Ma, C’mere quick!” “What is it, Mary?” “Look, Johnny ate all the raisins off that sticky brown paper.” Do you discipline yourself as severely as you criticize others? Impatience causes as many failures as stupidity. An Englishman just returning to London from a visit over here, was very much impressed with our current slang phrase, “So's your old man," In telling his friends about his visit he said: ”They ’ave a very clevah saying over theya‘h jus’ now. When a man wishes to er— pun, so to speak, another friend. ’e simply says, “Your fawther is the same way. Haw, Haw! Clevah, isn’t it? Haw, Haw! A young minister, attracted by pretty Sister Grace, was dining with the family. Little Evelyn, aged 7, was talking rapidly when the minister was about to ask the blessing. So, turning to the child, he said in a tone of mild reproof, “Evelyn, I am about to ask grace.” Well, its about time," answered Evelyn. “We've been expecting you to ask her for a year and so has she.” High-School Alumni Aid worthy Students Student loan funds granted last year by the student benefit club, an activity of the Lansing (Mich) High School Alumni Association, enabled 13 girls and 8 boys to continue in school. A total of $2,250 was loaned to these 21 pupils. In the 15 years since the organization of the club 82 pupils have been aided. The principal of the fund now amounts to nearly $6,000. One per cent interest is charged until the pupil has been out of college one year, when it is expected that the loan will be repaid. Collegiate Study The Palladian's regular Monday afternoon program was made more interesting by a study of what other college’s are doing. Mary Francis ‘Whitson entertained the members with a charming selection "On Being Collegiate." ”Roommates" and the art of ”getting along” was brought out by Letha Capps. Sheila Officer gave the latest news on“Drinking and Dancing.” “Short Saying” in college life were given by Charlotte Watson. An instructive and much appreciated talk on "Being Young" was given by Muriel Gipson. Eleanor Haile concluded this snappy program by giving the very latest “Collegiate English.” Sherwood Society The Sherwood Literary Society met in the regular meeting room, January 24th, and rendered the following program: Devotional – Chaplain. Debate: Resolved, that Stonewall Jackson was a greater leader than Robert E. Lee. Affirmative, Henry Mallory; Negative, E. J. Wood. Oration –Roy Leonard. Several new men affiliated with the society. We are always glad to have new men come in and put their heart to the work and help us along. Our enrollment is increased at almost every meeting and we are continually climbing to higher things. If you are not affiliated with a society, we welcome you to ours, open heartedly. To establish 100 scholarships for rural teachers in summer schools of George Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tenn., the sum of $100,000 has been donated to the college.

1926 February 5

 THE TECH ORACLE BOTH BOYS’ AND GIRLS’ CAGE TEAM PLAY GOOD GAMES OF BALL MILLIGAN WINS HARDFOUGHT GAME FROM TECH BOYS Score 28-25 Tech was defeated last Tuesday night by a 28-25 score, in the fastest game seen in many moons. The game was fast from the start, and the lead was swayed from one side to the other during the first half that period ending with Milligan holding the count 18-14. The Tech boys were unable to find the basket in the early part of the latter half, and the visitors had obtained a ten points lead before our boys registered a point. Our boys sayed a wonderful rally in the last minutes of the fray, and after all scored one more point than did the opposition in this period. Had it not been for erratic shooting by Clark Elount and Jobe, who missed several close shots each, there would have been a different story. The exceedingly rough play gave the larger Milligan boys a decided advantage. The visitors committed nine personal fouls, with Tech committing seven. Jobe and Payne received three of the personal penalties each, while not a man was expunged by the personal route. To Alcorn must go the credit of leading the play of the game. He guarded the basket in a style never before seen on a local floor. The visitors got only one shot from within the foul line, while our boys got several shots on the “follow up.” The visitors got many goals from near the center of the floor which we are inclined to call “luck,” while every pointed registered by our team was made after perfect passing had carried the ball well under the goal. Watson, Blount and Jobe all played wonderful games, while Witt and Payne were the stars for the visitors. Million showed some excellent dribbling, while his shoot()ing was a bit erratic. The visitors caged 12 shots from the floor, as against 11 for Tech. They covered four of eight free throws, against three of ten for Tech Payne was the high corer with 11 points, while Jobe and Witt were tied for second with nine each. Lineups: Tech Pos. Milligan Blount (6) F Payne (11) Clark (7) F Million (7) Jobe (9) C Witt (9) Watson (2) G McCray Alcorn G Sawyer (c) Substitutions: Milligan-Hodges (1) for Witt; Alexander for Million, Stringfield for Payne, Witt for Hodges, Million for Alexander. Tech-Carr for Watson, Poteet for Clark, Watson for Carr, Winningham (1) for Poteet. Official –Balcomb, Referee. T.P.I. Tournament February 19-20-21. TOURNAMENT COMING FEBRUARY 19, 20, 21 The Tech Tournament will be played February 19, 20, 21. This tournament is expected to be an even greater success than last year’s event, a several new schools are expected to enter. Plants are being formulated to bring sixteen teams here for the event. This means that the heart, cooperation of every student and patron is necessary in order to put the thing over in a successful manner. The teams that participated last year are all coming back strong, and several new teams are expected to enter, which insures a keen brand of competition. Granville and Baxter, champion and runner up respectively, of last year’s tournament will come back with a fight, and the other team are each expected to show added strength. This tournament is sponsored by the Cookeville Lions Club, and that organization is in a large degree responsible for the success of the event. “T” CLUB REORGANIZES As a result of the meeting called by Coach Overall, the T Club has been reorganized at Tech. All students who have been awarded letters are eligible for membership in this club. The following officers were elected: Puckett. P.esident. football ’22, ’24, basketball ’22. LeFevre, vice president Football 21, 22, 23, 24. Shipley, secretary and treasurer. Baseball ’23,’24. Nice president LeFevre took charge of the meeting, and outlined a working program appointed a committee to draw up a constitution, and called for a discussion of meats whereby money could be raised in order to purchase gold footballs, for the football letter men of ’24 reason. It was decided to begin work on a negro minstrel under the direction of Miss Jobe in order to raise money on the football fund. This program will be presented within the next two months. After naming the date for the next meeting a motion to adjourn was carried. COACHES APPROVE CHANGES IN 1925 RULES Four recommendations for changes in the rules of football as they now stand were made last week in New York at the meeting attended by over 200 coaches of the game. The chief change recommended was that the kickoff should be moved back to the 40-yard line. This is to prevent kicking over the opponent’s goal line and the consequential of placing the ball on the 20-yard line, which has occurred all () too frequently this last season. The use are limited to four inches in heihi was also recommended. The coaches would also do away with the low of dowas when the deven ive ride in off ide. The ou chain e recommended was hat the rule on blocked kicks should be clarified and to make the head lineman and not the referee responsible for decreeing the rough in of the ick so that the referee will be free to leap closer watch on the ball as it is run down the field. Objections to the forward pass were not accepted by the coaches neither was the recommendation to prohibit a player on either side from running with a recovered fumble. The exponents of this rule that the man recovering should immediately ground the ball. These rule will likely be acted upon at the next meeting of the rules committee. Silence is golden, but the students in Tech’s library are not gold-seekers. DUMAS McCOIN 23 DIES OF BLOOD POISONING Dumas McCoin died January 14, at his home near Whitleyville, Tennessee. Mr. McCoin graduated from the Technical High School department of this institution in 1923. He spent three years here, entering the second year of the preparatory school in 1920. During this period he was loved by students and faculty alike and his unexpected departure is a cause of grief to all whose knew him. While here he took an active part in the work of his class organization and of the Sherwood Literary Society, of which he was a member. He served his society as treasurer and again as chaplain and his work in both offices will long be remembered. There are numerous other ways in which we remember Dumas, but time would fail us to mention them all. He is gone, yet he lives, for “To live in the hearts we leave behind Is not to die.” THE MANNHEIMER CONCERT Under the auspices of the Cookeville Music Club Mr. Frank Mannheimer, pianist, appeared at the City School Auditorium Friday night in a grand concert. Mr. Mannheimer is an able pianist and has appeared in a series of once it in the each during the last season. It was an honor to the music club and to the people of Cookeville to be given the opportunity of en in this master artisan in a recital here. His wonderful technique and masterful interpretation held hearers spellbound to the end of the program, and it seemed as though no end of encore would asf them. EAST TENNESSEANS ORGANIZE A group of enthusiastic students from East Tennessee met and organized an East Tennessee Club Monday, Jan. 26. Eight counties were represented as follows: Bledsoe –Juanita Montgomery. Lucile B. Lee Bradley –John M. Frazier Cumberland –Pauline Johnson. Martha Sedivak, Anna L. Roberts. Fentress –Roy R. Bagwell, Annie Lee Boles, Benton Cantrell, Furnice Minor, Metta E. Clark, Margarette Peters, Marie Peters, Ethel Smith, Effie Woods, Edgar Williams. Hamilton –Dan Bassett. Morgan –Frank Cheek. Rhea –Jesse R. Clark Scott –James W. Keen () The following officers were elected: President John M. Frazier; Vice president, Benton Cantrell; secretary and treasurer, Lucile B. Lee This club has a two-fold purpose in view. First, it will endeavor to further the cause of T.P.I. in East Tennessee by acquainting the people of this section with the various phases of the school. It will try to present T.P.I. to the young people of East Tennessee in such a way as to attract them to its hall. Second it will make an effort to make the life of its members as pleasant and profitable as possible while in the institution. This club is supply in a need that has long been felt by the students and alumni of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. GIRLS BREAK EVEN ON TRIP. DEFEAT DEUMBERLAND Score 22-15 On Friday night, Jan. 23, our girls handed the Cumberland girls the sting of a 22-15 count on the Cumberland floor. The game was clean and fast throughout, and plainly showed the superiority of our team. This was the first game our ladies have won, but we feel that they are now attaining their real form, and shall expect them to show us come real playing for the retained of the season. For Cumberland Misses Wesson and Ayer were the stars, while the entire Tech team played excellent ball Lineups. Cum. (15) Pos. Tech (22) Wesson (6) F Shipley (12) Ayer (7) F Vaughan (6) Hamilton (2) C Whitson (4) Donnell G Haile Vaughn G Moore Substitutions: Cumberland –Smart for Vaughn T.P.I. –McKeel for Haile. Lose to Normal 54-21 After defeating Cumberland our girls continued to Murfreesboro, where they were defeated 54-21. The game was fast and interesting despite the large score. It seems that the normal girls were playing inspired basketball. Misses Beasley and Marshall were the stage for Normal, while Shipley, Vaughan and Whitson starred for Tech Lineups. Normal (54) Pos. Tech (21) Page (16) F Shipley (9) Pearle (11) F Vaughan (8) Marshall (28) C Whitson (4) Snell G Moore Jones G McKeel Substitutes Normal –Ganna- wa (2). Pate (5) Tech –Haile Girls lose to Peabody The Tech Ladies battled Peabody College Friday night Jan. 16, on the latter’s floor, and lost a hard game by 26-14. Our girls lost to a superior team, and we are very well satisfied with their showing. We were doped to lose by 30 points, and the work of our entire team is really commendable. The Peabody girls have held the Southern championship for four years, and are rarely ever held to so close a score. The game was a credit to Miss Jobe, who is a former member of the Peabody team. Miss Elliot was the star for Peabody, while Vaughan, Shipley and Moore played well for Tech. Lineups: Peabody (26) Pos. Tech (14) Perkerson (4) F Vaughan (4) () Elliot (14) F Shipley (8) Britton (4) C Whitson (2) Crowley G McKeel Dean G Moore Substitutions: Peabody –Burns (4) for Brittons, Sneed for Elliot. THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Printed by Herald Publishing Co. Entered at the Cookeville Post Office Second class rate pending. STAFF Bryce D. Stone ’26 Editor-in-Chief Eleanor Haile ’27 Asst. Ed-in-Chief Associate Editors Dewitt T. Puckett ’25 Wit and Humor Shelia Officer ’29 Social Amy Shipley ’28 Class Hallie Ray ’26 Faculty Hendon Johnston ’26 Athlete Thos. L. Passons English Alex Shipley Poet Business Department: James D. Miller ’27 Business Manager Jack Morrison ’26 Assistant Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY THE TOURNAMENT Tech’s second annual Basketball Tournament has been announced for February 19, 20, 21. This is an event which depends for its success upon the cooperation of the citizenship of Cookeville and the student body of Tech. The schools whose teams will be here are the schools upon which Tech is mainly dependent for students to fill the places in her college department. It was for the ambitious students of these high schools that T.P.I. was created and it is for and with these students that we, who are already here, must work and become better acquainted. Let us remember our efforts of last year, and build upon that successful event, plans for a greater and better tournament. EDITING THE ORACLE Getting out this paper is no picnic. If we print jokes, folks say we are silly. If we don’t they say we are too serious. If we publish original matter they say we lack variety. If we published things from other papers, we are too lazy to write. If we stay on the job, we ought to be out rustling business. If we rustle business, we are not attending to our own department. If we don’t print contributions we don’t show proper appreciation. If we do print them, we are accused of filling up with junk. Like as not some fellow will say we swiped this from an exchange. So we did. TECH’S RED HEADS Twenty Red Heads of T.P.I. met Dec. 5, 1924, and organized a Flashy Red Headed Club. The following officers were elected: President –John Bell Vice President –Henrietta Jared. Secretary and Treasurer –Dimple Greenwood Sergeant-at-Arms –Harold Blount John Bell, our famous red-headed president, loves to talk, and when he becomes enthusiastic he reminds you of that famous redheaded bird that you see near the top of telephone poles, pecking in the holes for bugs. Yet he is some winner when it comes to a debating contest. The vice president, Miss Henrietta Jared, is a very modest, quiet girl, but her hair is of that variety of red that sends out a brilliant glow, and gives the boys fair warning that she has plenty of temper, and if you should rouse her temper she would let you hear from her by red hot words –like the sparks from an anvil. When this club of glowing red heads came to look for a secretary and treasurer they chose Miss Dimple Greenwood because she like the red headed woodpecker that stores away the beechnuts in a hole for winter, will put what money she gets in the bank for safe keeping refusing to spend any, but will continually pecking on the other red heads to make them pay their dues. Harold Blount, on account of his skill as a football player, was chosen as sergeant-at-arms for the reason we know that he will tackle anyone who tries to enter our club without a red head, and besides, his head is so red that it will serve as a beacon light to guide our red heads to the entrance of our club room. Oh, don’t you wish you were a red head, so that you could be admitted into our club, for we certainly are a mysterious club and when we meet our red heads give all the warmth and light we need, so that we don’t have to buy coal to keep us warm nor have to pay any light bills. It certainly is ridiculous to be a member of this wonderfully mysterious club. We are sorry for all who wanted to become red heads after we organized our club. But our sergeant-at-arms will admit no one but “Genuine Red Heads” We extend an invitation to all the red headed students now entering T.P.I. to become members of our club. PATRONIZE ORACLE ADVERTISERS QUERIES Who are the largest ladies in the United States? Ans. Miss Ouri and Mrs. Sippi When is a newspaper like a delicate child? Ans. When is appears weekly. Why does a miller wear a white hat? Ans. To keep his head warm. What ship carries the most passengers? Ans. Courtship When was paper money first mentioned in the Bible? Ans. When the dove brought the green back to Noah. How long did cain hate his brother? Ans. As long as he was Abel. At what time of day was Adam born? Ans. A little before Eve. Why was Eve made? Ans. For Adam’s Express Company. Why did Adam bite the apple Eve gave him? Ans. Because he had no knife. Why is a good husband like dough? Ans. Because a woman needs him –Exchange Which one of the United States is the largest and most popular? Ans. State of matrimony. When is a man obliged to keep his word? Ans. When no one will take it. If all the women went to China where would the men go? Ans. To Pekin. Why is a room full of married people like an empty room? Ans. Because there is not a single person in it. What was Joan of Arc made of? Ans. Maid of Orleans. How does the Queen of Siam take her pills? Ans. In cider. What is the noblest musical instrument? The vilest? Ans. Upright piano; a lyre. SENIOR SARCASM If ignorance were bliss, these Sophomores would be blisters. MUSIC APPRECIATION The first number of the Music Appreciation Course, for 1925, was given to January 14th, when Mrs. J.H. Carrien sang a group of songs. Mrs. Carlen is a soprano soloist of note. She sang: “The Little Damozel” “Lullaby” Scott “The Answer” Terry As encores she gave “big Brown Bear,” Mauna-Zucca, and “Love sends a Little Gift of Roses.” January 22 Miss Stanton gave a very interesting lecture on the Symphony Orchestra. Her lecture was illustrated by selections on the Victrola. The records played were: “Humoresque” Dvorak “Eli Eli” Schindler “Rondo Capriccio o” Saint Seans LITERARY SOCIETIES The Sherwoods organized for the Winter term by electing the following officers; President, Benton Gantrell. Vice President, John F. Barksdale. Secretary, Alton B. Adams. Treasurer, W.G. Whiteaker. Attorney General, Gilbert H. Hatfield Critic, James P. Buck. Chaplain, Herman Lanford Sergeant-at-Arms, Alva Starnes. All these have been inducted into their respective offices and assumed their duties. This term bids fair to be one o the most successful in the history of the Sherwoods. A notable increase in interest over that of last term. Several old members have returned to school and several new members have been received into the society. UPPER CUMBERLAND LITERARY SOCIETY A very interesting and enthusiastic meeting of the Upper Cumberland Literary Society was held on Monday afternoon, Jan. 25. The principal feature of the program was a debate, the question being “Resolved, That the Government of the United States should establish and maintain a national park in the Appalachian region of Tennessee and North Carolina.” The affirmative was represented by Hendon Johnson and Henry Ferrell; Smith Herbert Bracey, and Otto Masters argued for the negative. The speeches on each side showed much thought and study. The judges rendered their decision in favor of the affirmative. At the close of the program the house was in order for the nomination of our annual debators. L.B. LeFevre made a splendid speech nominating Benton M. Carr and John M Frazier to represent us in the annual debate. Each member of the society seemed to be of the same opinion as Mr. LeFevre in regard to whom should represent us in the annual debate. Both members are of exceptional ability and we feel sure they will bring us victory. BELLES LETTRES The Belles Lettres met in the Auditorium Jan. 19 1925. A very interesting program was rendered, which consisted of the following numbers: Tribute to Robert E. Lee, Georgia Whitaker Lee’s Courtship and Home Life, Mary Tom Johnson. Lee’s Struggle Against His Love for His Home State Ruth Quarles. Lee’s Career as a General, Juanita Montgomery. Imagine the Consequences if the Confederates had Won the War, Effie Wood. Piano Solo, Dixie, Ona V Ellis The Belles Lettres are glad to have the following young ladies become members: Dena Langford, Anna Roberts, Meta Clark, Margaret Peters, Marie Peters, Ethel Smith, Jewel Lee, Mayford Hall, Dixie Brown, Mrs. Carr. Former members who have returned are: Mary Tom Johnson. Alice E. Tardy, Bula Milligan Parco Tollison. Y.M.C.A. The Y.M.C.A. was called to meet at the usual meeting place at the beginning of this term. The purpose of this meeting was to become acquainted with the new students and to let them know the things for which the Y.M.C.A. stands. Each student was given an opportunity to introduce himself and we had a real live meeting. As a result several became members and their cards were issued. Plans were announced and speeches made that the Y.M.C.A. meet regularly this term, and we believe we can make it the best year in the history of the organization. Y.W.C.A. The Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. gave a social Wednesday evening Jan 21, 1925, in the Auditorium of the Administration Building. An interesting program was given, which consisted of the following: Song Al’ Reading M.F. McDearman Song Male Quartet Vocal Solo Lillian Pointer Benediction Clyde Jackson After the program each person was asked to make two or more New Year’s resolutions for some friend that needed them most. Jimmie Miller was successful in obtaining the largest number of resolutions. The boys and girls were then matched, and they marched down into the gymnasium, where they played Japanese wine grab and Virginia gel. Later delicious refreshments wre served. There were quite a number of students present, and each one seemed to have enjoyed the evening very much. SENIOR HIGH CLASS The Senior High class has several new members since Christmas holidays. Every one had a big time Christmas and is now ready for work. The “bit” of work for the class during class meetings is small but hard to do. The attendance at these class meetings is not as large as it should be. The Senior plans to make this the greatest year of their school experience. Those who do not graduate will go to college though they will not receive a diploma. LOCAL SOCIETY Mr. Shipley Gives Dance On Friday evening, Mr. Alex Shipley entertained a group of students with a dance at the home of his parents on Willow street. Music was furnished by the Joyland Six Mr. and Mrs. Morrison Lowe acted as chaperones. A large crowd attended and all report a pleasant time. Miss Smith Honoree of Dance Miss Myrale Bullock entertained her friends with a dance on Saturday evening in honor of Miss Dollay Smith of Nashville, a former student of T.P.I. Hughes’ Joyland Six Orchestra furnished music for the occasion, and throughout the evening Tutti Frutti frappe was served Dancing hours were from 9 to 12. Out of town guests were Messrs Arnold, Smith, Mofield, Officer and Breeding of Livingston, and Ledbetter of Monterey. TEN COMMANDMENTS FOR HIGH-SCHOOL STUDENTS 1. Come to school early so you can stand around in the hall and annoy the teacher who is doing hall duty. 2. 2. Don’t bother about being on time; it will give you indigestion to hurry to school. 3. 3. If you happen to be a Freshman, don’t register in any particular course, just skip around. It will help when you wish to graduate. 4. Don’t be courteous –someone might mistake you for a gentleman. 5. Whatever happens, don’t stop chewing gum or eating candy. The faculty might think the world was coming to an end. 6. Don’t forget to forge your parent’s name to permits. 7. Never study during school hours. You might get your lessons and the shock would be too great for the teacher. 8. Wander around as much as possible during the assembly period. It helps those who are studying. 9. Take your pencil and paper from any desk that happens to be near by. The owner’s father is, perhaps, a wealthy oil man. 10. Find fault with everything about the school. It helps you to make friends. What’s taxes? A baby that grows fast and keeps you awake at night, and gives you but little rest in daylight. PATRONIZE ORACLE ADVERTISERS. Poet’s Corner PESSIMISM The day is dark and very drear, And rain is beating down. A wind is threshing with a leer; Its power just newly found. I try to think; I find it hard. I have the blues I dread. My life with disdain I regard, I wish that I were dead. This life hardship and distress, With nothing here to gain. We labor thru to win success And find we lived in vain Some books I’ve seen on “Live Your Best,” But all are Greek to me I’ll live and wonder like the rest While time does onward flee. --Alex Shipley MY WAGE I bargained with life for a penny And life would pay no more, However I begged at evening, When I counted my scanty store For a life is a just employer, He gives us what we ask. But once we have set the wages, Why we must beat the task. I worked for a manial’s hire, Only to learn dismayed That any wage I had asked of life; Life would gladly paid. --Rittenhouse. A PHANTOM The twinkling stars are shining down, The earth is wet with dew; Illuminated heavens all abound In lights of fiery hue. A quarter moon is hanging low, And lucent is its light. The water of the lake do glow, Me thinks I see a sprite. It is the phantom of my love, As flits across the deep; It has the speed of flying dove, This image I will keep --Alex Shipley AT A BOOKSTALL I saw a boy with eager eye Open a book upon a stall, And read as he’d devour it all; Which when the stall-man did spy, Soon to the boy I heard him all “You, sir, you never buy a book, Therefore in one you shall not look.” The boy pass’d slowly on, and with a sigh He wish’d he never had been taught to read Then of the old churl’s books he should have had no need Charles Lamb THE HOME There was at one time in the world’s history but one place of living the home. In it all things were done and enjoyed. It produced what it consumed and consumed what it produced. Long ago that stage ended. There are now in the world two places of living for the larger part of civilized humanity –the home and the shop. The shop produces and the home consumes. In this it still stands for the primal home idea: the thought in that first beginning of home when it was but a hole in the ground to eat and sleep and hide in. all the beauty and sanctity and power of the home follow on this primal thought of security shelter; a place in which to take food and rest, and gather strength for outside use. It is at this point that the modern home falls of its main function, in that it persists in combining home and shop. Any form of persistent industry is foreign to the essential idea of home, the place orest. In days gone by the man’s home was the woman’s shop where in she perpetually demonstrated the old song: “A man’s work is from sun to sun, But a woman’s work is never done” Today we find very little evidence to base this saying on, The home is a most essential part of the world, not a different thing, yet our thought and modest of expression would seem to make it so. Civilization was born from the home. From the home it is renewed and out of the home must come the influence that will be the uplifter of mankind. --Hallie Ray. THE LEMONADE STAND By Lucile Cameron Robert Jackson whose nickname was Bob, belonged to the circus. He was ten years old and had light hair and blue eyes. He was a very lonely little boy because he had run away from home to join the circus since he had joined he had been very homesick. Bob worked at the lemonade stand. When business was not good his boss whipped him and would not give him any supper. He would never let Bob have a bit of lemonade. Bob usually stood at the lemonade stand with his hands folded, looking very downcast, and waiting for someone to buy. He was very fond of the little girl who was the bareback rider whose name was Irene. Every week when he got his pay he would give Irene a general set-up to candy, lemonade, and a popcorn ball. One wet, rainy day his boss gave him two pitchers of lemonade and told him that when he sold it, he would not have to self any more. There were not many people at the circus that day; he had a hard time selling his lemonade. It took him so long that he took a severe cold Mr. Rolf, who was the boss, was very angry when he heard this. Then when the doctor ordered Bob to stay in for a week, he was more angry than ever, for he knew he would lose the money that Bob made at the lemonade stand. Irene, who loved Bob as much as he loved her, said “I will try my luck at the lemonade stand while Bob is sick.” She sold more in one week than Bob usually sold in a month Bob wanted to change jobs with her, but of course, that was impossible. One night Irene had her back hurt very seriously. Now was Bob’s chance to pay her back. He said with determination, “I will learn to ride” Irene had to remain in a wheel chair for a year. She took charge of the lemonade stand and bob rode. He became very famous. When the time came for him to go back to the lemonade stand his fame went with him and he sold lemonade enough in two weeks to pay his fare home. He then left the circus and went back to his longed-for parents. WHAT MAKES A COLLEGE? Buildings and money are necessary for a college for there must be class rooms and dormitories. There must be money with which to equip the class rooms and laboratories and to pay the salaries which the teachers demand. With all this, however, the best equipped college can do little good unless there is a well developed college spirit. College spirit develops characteristics which can not be gained by hours spent in the class room. His life as a citizen depends largely on these qualities. They give a broader idea of his obligations to society. A college student is democratic, tolerant, cooperative, efficient, public spirited, and generous. A good college would therefore be one where men of all classes have equal opportunities to learn to study and to play. The spirit of a college body of that kind will not be so high as the ideals of the best students, nor so low as the alms of the poorest, but will strike an average. As in every democracy the students should aim at all times to raise this standard of college spirit. This spirit is tested daily. The men on the athletic field fight hard a game but they lose. A student body with a high grade college spirit keeps supporting the team until the last whistle blows. It is not that they won or lost which counts, but how they played the game. This applies to the class room as well. The examination is hard; the temptation to look on the other fellow’s paper is great, but remember, Honor is a great thing. A student must study as hard as he plays to attain true college spirit. What, then, is this college which is of equal importance with a well equipped college plant and well trained teachers? It is is working with a good will for the college, by working with and for all the men and all the ideals that make up the college. SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL CLASS The Senior High School Class met last Wednesday and elected Clifford Massa class representative. The order for class pins was renewed. The invitations were selected, and many other plans were made for graduation day. The class will sponsor a musical comedy by pupils of Miss Tennie Alma Stanton. GET ACQUAINTED PARTY The Palladians and Upper Cumberlands entertained the new students with a get acquainted party Jan. 10. In a very novel way the new students were introduced. Then all assembled in the gym, where games were played and the music furnished by the orchestra. At the close of the meting very unique refreshments were served, consisting of hambergers and lemon sours. Every member of the societies did their best to give the new students a good time. FUN Mr. Hatfield was scoring the hired man for his extravagance in wanting to carry a lantern when going to call on his best girl. “The idea,” he scoffed. “When I was courtin’ I never carried no lantern; I went in the dark,” The hired man proceeded to fill the lantern. “Yes,” he said sadly, “and just look what you got.” P.O. Hudgens: “Lee Sadler, who is your teammate?” Lee Sadler: “Dale Lee. Do you know him?” P.O.: “Yes.” Lee Sadler: “Well, you don’t know much.” Words and eggs must be handled with care. As eggs once broken and words once spoken are not the easiest things to repair. T.P.I. Tournament February 19-20-21. BUFF AND WOOTEN (Trading Shoes) Wooten: “What size are yours?” Buff: “Small nines, about the size of eights.” Wooten: “Well, mine are large eights, about the size of hints.” WHAT’S IN A NAME? Young Wooten wouldn’t but Effie Wood would. A rose grows on the High Wall We have a King, a Miller, a Daisy, two Pearls, a Pointer, a Baker, and two Carrs. A Lowe Dale is the greatest depression in the Freshman class All Haile the Freshman! SCENE –COUPLE OUT RIDING Fred Terry: “My clutch is so weak.” Williard Johnson: “So I have noticed.” Mr. Barnes: “What is generally used to carry an electric current?” Elizabeth Hargis: “Why, e-e- Mr. Barnes: “Correct. And what is the unit of electric power?” Elizabeth H.: “The what?” Mr. B.: “That is correct.” Mr. Passons: “Name a celebrated English novelist, Ruby.” Ruby McKeel (dropping a book) “Th’ Dickens.” Mr. Passons: “Correct.” WANTED: A pair of shock absorbers for the heart. (Frances Huffman) A ticket to Granville. (Dale Lee.) A book telling how to hold to the one and cling to the other (James Miller.) A square meal. (Dan Bassett.) Some one to make announcements in chapel. (Dean Smith.) An adjustable maxim silencer (President Smith.) A place for my seat. (Verna Huddleston.) HIS HERITAGE “You look like an idiot,” thundered Mr. McDearman to his son Bancroft, just returned from college. “You grow more like a conceited, hare-brained, helpless idiot.” Just then an acquaintance of the old gentlemen entered the offered and saw the youth. “Hello, Ban, back, eh?” exclaimed the visitor. “You’re looking more like your father every year.” “Yes.” Said Ban, “that’s just what the governor’s been telling me.” THINGS WE HATE TO THINK ABOUT “I Want My Old Girl Back.” “Tears.” “When I’m Gone You’ll Soon Forget Me.” “Somebody Stole My Gal.” “I Hate to Lose You.” “The Last Rose of Summer.” “Somebody’s Done Me Wrong.” “I’m Sorry I Made You Cry.” “Your Lies Tell Me Yes, But There’s No, No In Your Eyes.” FOR MEN ONLY Dident you if woman a be wouldent you it read would you knew I –Exchange Leonard (on finding a pebble in a dish of potatoes): “We are not supposed to eat rocks.” Beulah Milligan: “That’s all right. You need a little grit.”

1925 February 1

 THE TECH ORACLE TECH STUDETNS FAVOR WORLD COURT Vote Taken Friday at Chapel Assembly The Tech student body voted on the World Court question at the regular Chapel assembly on Friday, December 4. About 65 per cent of the students voted on the question 92 per cent of those voting favored United States participation in the Court, while 8 per cent were opposed. Through the student Christian Associations the results of this voting will be forwarded to The New Student where the returns from colleges all over the nation will be tabulated. This consensus of student opinion will be laid before congress when it begins a discussion of the World Court, on December 17th. “TWELFTH NIGHT” As is announced elsewhere in this paper, the college department has chosen “Twelfth Night” for the annual presentation of Shakespearean drama. While the play will hardly be given before commencement, elaborate plans are already under way for the event. As an inducement to attendance from the surrounding towns, those coming from each town will be assigned a section of seats in the auditorium, especially decorated for their delegation. To all communities represented by ten or more people, a prize will be given and a special award will be made to the largest delegation. The above is but a small part of the plan which is to make of “Twelfth Night” the most phenomenal success of anything ever attempted by Tech students. Characters for the play are being selected now and real work will begin after the holidays are over. Messrs. McClanahan and Passons will direct the play. (A column in each succeeding issue of the Oracle will contain information relating to “Twelfth Night.” Read it. –Editor.) GLEE CLUBSIN CONCERT There are three Glee Clubs at T.P.I. this year –A girls’ Glee Club, a boys’ Glee Club, and a mixed chorus –all are working regularly each week. Girls’ Glee Club The Girls Glee Club started early with a good membership and has been doing good work. Those belongings to this club are: Mary Ellen Rash, jessie Barnes, Amy Shipley, Elsie Young, Beulah Clark, Muriel Gibson, Elise Gregory, Mary Ellen Shanks, Virginia Wilcox, Louise Wood, Emily Stanton, Agnes Greenwood, Thelma McCormick, Elizabeth Hargis, Lucille Cameron. Boys’ Glee Club The Boys’ Glee Club was organized later in the term. Some good voices are beginning to show up as the work progresses. This club boasts two members of the faculty, Mr. Hilliard and Mr. McClanahan. Mr. McClanahan, who has had a great deal of experience with glee from Calhoun: Davis, a guard from Shop Springs High. The others trying out are the two Stringfield brothers, and R. Robbins, guards; and Johnson, Snyder, M.L. () club is assisting Miss Stanton I the direction of the work. The following are members: Luther Puckett, Gradys Winningham, Mr. Hilliard, Mr. McClanahan, George Lewis, Otto Masters, Ray Baker, Thurston Tipps, Alvin Jackson, Armon Clark, Eugen Wood. Mixed Chorus The mixed chorus was formed by combining the Boys’ and Girls’ Glee Clubs. This organization will do some concert work during the year. Their first appearance will be at the City School auditorium Dec. 11. On a program under the auspices of the Cookeville Music Club. The Girls’ Glee Club will also appear on this program. Orchestra The School Orchestra will take on different timbre this year. There are stringed instruments to take the place of the wind instruments that we had last year. We lost several of our members of last year to other institutions but the new members are working hard to make this year’s orchestra the best one T.P.I. has ever had. The Personnel is as follows: Violins –Mr. Hillard, Kathleen Gibson, Agnes Greenwood, Mary Ellen Shanks. Guitar –Beulah Clark. Mandolin –Fred Tardy. Trumpet –Clem Allen Womack. Drums –Albert Brogden. Piano and Director –Miss Stanton. COLLEGE DEPARTMENT At a recent meeting of the United College Classes the following business was transacted. Mr. Davis Chairman of the committee for the selection of the Shakespearean play reported that the committee had decided upon “Twelfth Night.” This play is to be presented some time during the spring term by the College Department. It was suggested by Mr. Darwin that the balance of the money realizes on last year’s play be used for the floral tribute sent by the T-Club at the death of our schoolmate, Louis B. Lefevre. All the members were urged to be getting up enthusiasm for an Annual this year. We are attending a real school, let’s have all that goes with it. BASKETBAL SQUAD BEGINS PRACTICE Coaches Report Splendid Material for Team On Monday, Nov. 30th, varsity basketball practice was begun in earnest and about twenty men have been responding to the call each day since. Five letter men on last year’s team are here working out daily –Jobe, Watson, Poteet, Winningham and Carr –and Alcorn, a very efficient guard also of last year’s team, will arrive in a few weeks. The worth of these men are well known to Tech followers. Jobe, at center, was the equal of any man who opposed him in jumping. He can also play any position with as equal ease. Watson is a good shot. Poteet is a very fast forward and good at close shots. Winningham last year alternated at guard and center. He is capable of playing any position with equal ability. He is a good floor-working, fairly good at distance, and excellent on close-ups. Carr was a substitute on last year’s squad, but is showing up better this year and promises to give somebody a hard fight for a regular position. Cooper, captain of the team of 1923-24, and one of the best guards ever seen on the local court, is out and certain of a varsity berth. Moss, tall center on last year’s U.T. Freshmen team, promises to make one of the best centers Tech ever had. Outside of these two, who stand out above the lot, there are among the newcomers, Little speed, guard from Livingston academy.: Lewis, a fast but light forward, and Whittaker, forward. () from Calhound; Davis, a guard from Shop Springs High. The others trying out are the two Stringfield brothers and R. Robins. Guards: and Johnson, Snyder, M.L. Robbins and Burrows, forwards. Only eight games on the schedule have been definitely settled, but more are being arranged. Among the teams to be played this season are Cumberland, Bethel, Ogden, Carson-Newman, King College, East Tennessee Teacher’s College, Milligan, Cincinnati Surety Co., Bowling Green Business University, Western Kentucky Normally, and Middle Tennessee Teachers College. The complete schedule will be given in the next issue of the Oracle. CO-ED BASKETBALL For over a month the co-ed basketball squad of about thirty players have been going thru preliminary practice. The squad has now been cut to thirteen, the number that will be carried all seaso and is comprised of the following girls: Misses Shipley, Cassety, Annie Pearl Whitson, and Van Hooser, forwards. Of these girls, Miss Shipley, Cassety, Annie Pearl Whitson, and Van Hooser, forwards. Of these girls, Miss Shipley is the only one who has seen extensive service and is one of the best in the state. The guards are Misses Lucile Moore, McKrel, Cornwell, and Peters. Miss Moore and Miss McKeel received letters last year and are experienced players—Miss Moore being exceptionally good and Miss McKeel not far behind. The centers are Misses Lucy Whitson, Barnes, Starnes and Marguerite Moore Miss Whitson is by far the best of the lot and with good training should make one of the best in the state. The Co-ed schedule is also indefinite, but plans are being made for six games away and five at home. Among the teams to be played are Carson-Newman, E.T.T.C. Maryville. M.T.T.C., Cumberland Peabody and possibly Alabama Normal, where Miss Jobe is now coaching. PROFESSOR PEPP On Thursday evening, Dec. 17th, the much heralded visit of Professor Pepp to Cookeville will become a reality. Professor Pepp will appear at the city aschool auditorium of the above named date, in the person of one, J. Leslie Myers, who will be acocompanied by fifteen other enthusiastic Sherwoods and Belles Lettres, including in the cast. The nervous hysteria of Professor Pepp, the ludicrous absurdities of the Butterfly Buttonbuster, and the clownish antics of Sim Batty (C.W. Davis), the town constable show the prevailing mood of the play which is full of fun from beginning to end. Time—Three days in September. Place—A small College town. Time of Performance—Two Hours and Twenty minutes Admission—Adults 35c children 25c Doors Open—7 o’clock Play Begins—8 o’clock SOMETHING DIFFERENT Tech students seldom become bored with Chapel exercises. Fortunately this year we have been pleasantly entertained at Chapel by moving pictures, music, speeches, and interpretations of dances. It remained to Miss McClanahan’s physical education department to give us the most spicely different program of the season. On Nov. 26, at chapel a number of graceful and beautifully attired young damsels held intense attention of the student body for twenty whole minutes. We watched with great interest the almost forgotten dances so popular with other generations. The first dancer was that of the Irish Wash Woman, a hilariously funny dance involving a comical harmony of movements and a dizzy series of gyrations and oscillations. The three dances that follows were Skater’s Shattiche, Old Rustic, and the Sailor’s Hornpipe. These dances were much enjoyed, and the () student body called repeatedly for encores. Miss McClanahan and the girls who participated in the dances are to be congratulated upon the excellence of the program. The physical education classes can always be depended upon to give a different and amusing program. We are looking forward to being entertained by them at others times. NEWS FROM OTHER COLLEGES At Antioch College, the results of a study of the effects of smoking upon scholarship has been announced. The conclusions drawn were that, while there are no permanent effects of smoking upon blood pressure, lung capacity, or pulse rate, a definite relationship exists between smoking and low scholarship. Among the men students 31.8 per cent of non-smokers fail to maintain required grades, while 62.3 per cent of heavy smokers similarly fail. Inhalers fail most often. Of the 23 men dismissed from Antioch last year for scholarship, 20 were smokers. The working student does not always sacrifice his scholarship, as might be supposed. Forty-four percent of the honor students graduating from the undergraduate schools of Yale University, last June were students working their way through college. What is to be done with the $2,500 bequest of Emily J. Bryant, recently turned down by the Trustees of Vassar College? The money was to have been used as a scholarship find for students who played cards. It was declined on the ground that Vassar, an educational institution, cannot accept gifts placing restrictions upon the students’ personal or social behavior. Last year a student curricular committee at Hood College, Mary () land surveyed the college education system. Last May the committee submitted a report to the faculty, recommending a plan of class cuts for students with B grades or over. After a week of undergraduate discussion Yale College voted overwhelmingly for abolishing the compulsory feature of chapel. Two days of balloting resulted in a vote of 1681 for 241 against. By a 3 to 1 majority the faculty also expressed their disapproval of the institution. Students of Rutgers College, New Jersey, have voted to abolish the Honor System. Failure of the plan throughout most of its five years of existence is given as reason for the action. Enterprising radio fans at Harvard College, Pa., are planning an international intercollegiate chess match with the University of Argentine. Last year a match was arranged with Oxford University but was called off when nearly half completed by the British Government, because the University radio men’s license permitted the transmitting of experimental work only. At Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut Malcolm Stevenson, managing editor of The Tripod, student publication, rebelled –and was suspended from college for a month. His Offense: editorial criticism of a statement by Dean Edward Troxell in a chapel speech. Dean Troxell said, “Our duty in college is to disregard the individual and to turn out a Trinity type.” In commenting on this Stevenson declared, “Better a radical with a beard and a bomb than a type-a goosestepper—a man without brains enough or courage enough to declare himself.” The oldest journalism school in the United States, founded in 1869, at Washington and Lee University at the time Robert E. Lee was president, has recently been reestablished. HOW WE KNOW ‘EM It wouldn’t be “Powers” if he didn’t want to know how many credits he was making, or to borrow a U.T. catalogue. It wouldn’t be “Jess Clark” if he didn’t run thru the doors when the dinner bells rings. It wouldn’t be “Tipps” if he didn’t want to bum a chew of tobacco. It wouldn’t be “Louise Woods” if she wasn’t acting goofy. It wouldn’t be “Brownie” if he wasn’t calling respiration –aspiration. It wouldn’t be “Mrs. Morton” if she wasn’t trying to be hard-boiled. It wouldn’t be “C.W. Davis” if he wasn’t pleading with the waiters to bring on more eats. It wouldn’t be “Amy Shipley” if she wasn’t arguing with “Mr. Me” in Psychology class. It wouldn’t be “Robert Rose” if he didn’t always have a bad smelling pipe in his mouth. Everything that is great in life is the product of slow growth; the newer, the greater, the higher, and the nobler the work, the slower is its growth, the surer is its lasting success. Mushrooms attain their full power in a night; oaks require decades. A fad lives its life in a few weeks; a philosophy through generations and centuries. –Jordan. One of the things in life which we use the most and value the least is language. It is the distinction of our race, our highest prerogative, the instrument of our progress. It is the bond of brotherhood, too, and the body in which truth becomes incarnate. The thought history of the race is written in the very structure of its speech; and a language or a dialect is as significant of great social forces now long spent as the strata of the earth’s surface are concerns seismic energies. –Adams. “The question for each man to settle is not what he would do if he had the means, time, influence and educational advantages; the questions is what he will do with what he has. The moment a young man ceases to dream or to bemoan his lack of opportunities and resolutely looks his conditions in the face, and resolves to change them, he leaves the corner stone of a solid and honorable success.” “Half the giant’s strength is in the conviction that he is a giant. The strength of a muscle is enhanced a hundredfold by the willpower. The same muscle, when removed from the giant’s arm, when divorced from the force of the might will, can sustain but a fraction of the weight it did a moment before it was disconnected. When we have practiced good actions awhile, they become easy; when they are easy, we take pleasure in them; when they please us, we do them frequently,; and then, by frequency of act, they grow into habit. –Tillotson. Seventy-six percent of all men students and thirty eight per cent of all women students at the University of Nebraska are wholly or partially self-supporting. Exclusive of the College of Law, the average expenditure per student for the nine months is shown by a recent survey to be $714.66 for the men and $714.66. Time’s the king of men. For he’s their parent, and he is their grave, And gives them what he will, not what they crave. --Shakespeare. CONSOLING PHILOSPHY It is better to have loved and lost than to get married and be bossed. THAT CUMBERLAND GAME In a previous issue of the Oracle an advance notice on the Tech-Cumberland game under the above heading was given and we were very optimistic of the results. In this issue under the same title we are attempting to tell—How We Lost. If view points are to be given as to why we lost, it might first be said that we had no game the preceding week, and as a consequence the team relaxed in its training. And, if the true be told, such was the case and part of the cause. Then we might say that Cumberland got all the breaks and as a consequence our morale was broken. And, if we speak alright, such was the case and part of the cause. Then we might say that Cumberland got all the breaks and as a consequence our morale was broken. And, if we speak alright, such was the case and part of the cause. And again as a consequence deserved to have won. And, again we say, such was the case and part of the cause. And so on and so on, far, far, into the ink of football blackness. But that’s not so bad! Remember King College! And for fear somebody isn’t inclined to interpret this article in the right spirit, Remember Pleasant Hill! () To get down to plain facts, after waiving the more or less nonsense above. Tech lost the game partly because she didn’t play football, play it for all there is in there, as she did against M.T.T.C. and hard enough to at least have lowered the score by a big majority, and partly because of Singleton –the versatile half-back, who punts, run, passes, and does anything else with seemingly equal ease, and who is possibly the equal of any half in the South. Captain Miller, playing his last game for Tech was outstanding in his efforts to stem the tide, but had to be taken out because of injuries in the third quarter. It seemed that he and Jobe were the only ones who were actually doing all they were capable of. Outside of these few things that was about all there was to it. By the way, in passing, we forgot to mention that the score was 51 to 0. Line-Up Tech Cumberland Watson L.E. Hicks Brown L.T. Chastain Moss L.G. Sims Clark, J. C. Humphries Miller R.G. Vaden Wilson R.T. Martin Davis, C. R.E. Wesson Hughes Q.B. Singleton Starnes L.H. Haney Dowell R.H. Cockrill Jobe F.B. Yeargin REVIEW OF FOOTBALL 1925 There are some who will say that Tech’s 1925 football season was a failure and there are some, of course, who will say that it was a success. The writer is of the opinion that is was a very successful one. Measured, even in terms of the number of games won, it should be counted successful, for any team who wins half of its scheduled games has certainly had a successful reason. But this is not all. A method of coaching –new to Tech, and which bespeaks greater results for the future—was begun, and a most satisfactory beginning it was. And yet not all. The fine spirit of harmony and team-work which was prevalent after the first game is sure to be beneficent to the men themselves and to call forth cherished memories in after years. In the first game of the season we were defeated by Gallatin Private Institute 14 to 0. The game was played on a muddy field, but instead of sticking to straight football, as might have been expected. Gallatin brought out something we were unable to cope with all season () a well ordered passing attack which proved our undoing. However, the game brought out many defects in the team and served to make it a more efficient machine for future opponents. The next week we completely smothered Castle Heights 54 to 0 and thus avenged our defeat at their hands the previous season. The following week we journeyed to Bowling Green, and by general alertness and smart football, played a perfect score on the gridiron keyboard to the tune of 12 to 6, at Ogden’s expense. Ogden had previously beaten Cumberland 6 to 3. The week afterwards was the big game of the season and we were determined to stop the much talked of “Teachers” of Middle Tennessee. We did—but they stopped us also. The score was 0 to 0 and was the result of one of the best games ever seen on the local field. The next week the team went to Russellville, Ky., for a game with Bethel but because of a deep snow the game was called off—much to the satisfaction of the Bethel coach—so it seemed. The following week we journeyed to Madisonville for a game with Hiwassee. The bunch won the game 39 to 2 mainly thru the efforts and success of Watson in receiving passes and of Jobe in ploughing the line at will. The next week, due to a misunderstanding with the Sewanee Freshmen, no game was played, and that it proved very disastrous the following week was easily to be seen. This game, the last of the season, was played with Cumberland, who crushed us under an avalanche of passes 51 to 0. Cumberland had the better team and deserves to win, but by not more than three touchdowns. It was a plain case of giving up after a few breaks went to the opposing team. If the team had given Cumberland the battle it gave M.T.T.C., the score would certainly have been much lower, probably in our favor –Singleton notwithstanding. Football Scores Tech 0 Oct. 2 G.P.I. 14 Tech 55 Oct. 9 Castle Hts. 0 Tech 12 Oct. 17 Ogden 6 Tech 0 Oct. 23 M.T.T.C. 0 Tech 39 Nov. 7 Hiwassee 2 Tech 0 Nov. 20 Cumberland 51 OUR FOOTBALL TEAM There are football teams and other football teams. Which should a school prefer, a team composed of eleven brutes who massacre their opponents with an avalanche of touchdowns, or a hard fighting team composed of gentlemen who can both win and lose with the same old ready smile? Any college would prefer the latter kind of team, and that is the type of football team that has represented T.P.I. this season. There was no place for a quitter on this team. There was no place for a coward or for the player who fights only for self glory. Every man on the team at all times did his best and when it became necessary, a little more for the team and T.P.I. The work of no player was characterized by anything low or dirty or foul. No player tried attain individual stardom. There was no a player who did not at all times have the interest of the team first in his heart. It has never been our pleasure to have associated with a cleaner group of gentlemen than the men on the team of ’25. () What more could be said of a team? Scores made on the gridiron are soon forgotten. Forgotten, too, are the great stars and their imposing records. But lessons learned on the gridiron are always remembered long after the stars have faded away. We on the sidelines never know the priceless things that a football player learns. Football players win victories over themselves that we never see. Students in a large university are never conscious of the self-denial made by the fellows who play football. But our team is a part of us. That is why we appreciate our team so much. That is why we compliment our players so highly; ad we know whereof we speak. Much of the team’s success is due to the efforts of coaches Overall and Smith. Instead of teaching the players to fight with a brutal ferocity, the coaches have succeeded in instilling the fighting spirit of real men into the players and in bringing out their qualities of true sportsmanship. Although our team won no championships, the players won hosts of friends and admirers whenever they appeared. The team which can stand victory and which can lose without “beefing” never knows the bitterness of defeat. There is nothing but victory. In conclusion it can be truthfully said that no other team has ever won its way into the hearts of the students of Tech as has this hard fighting team of ’25. FOOTBALL SQAD GUESTS OF T.P.I.A.A. AT BANQUET On Friday evening, Dec. 4th, the Athletic Association entertained the members of the 1925 Football squad with an effective, well-planned banquet. About forty couples were seated at a large T-shaped table, the decorations of which developed a gold and black color note. A basket filled with an artistic arrangement of yellow Chrysanthemums and ferns was the central adornment of the table. Cut glass candlesticks holding gold and black tapers and smaller vases of Chrysanthemums and ferns, placed at intervals, further carried out the chosen colors motif. Miniature down-boxes were used as nut cups. The place cards were miniature football men in Tech uniforms. A delicious four-course menu was served. Mr. T.W. Kittrell acted as toastmaster, and the program for the evening was as follows: () Review of Team of ’25 Coach Overall Speaking of Outlook of ’26 Coach Smith The Scrubs and Their Relation to Literary Works Dean Smith Athletics on a Higher Plane Prof. McClanahan Miscellaneous Talk Jess Clark Relationship of Future of Athletic Pres. Smith Charge to New Captain Capt. James Miller Response --Captain of 1926 Eddie Watson Retiring Capt. Miller presented the Coaches—Overall and Smith, with small remembrances from the Football Squad. Letters were awarded members of the varsity. Eddie Watson, star left end of the team, was elected captain for next year. This brilliant affair was a fitting, conclusion to one of the most successful football seasons in the history of Tech. NEWS NOTES On Friday, Nov. 20th., Dean Austin W. Smith, accompanied by Robert Rose, Willie Gentle and Robert E. Smith, who were on their way to the ball game at Lebanon, visited the High School at Alexandria. The entire morning was taken up with this visit and each of the visitors made a favorable report on the cordial reception of the faculty and student boy. In his address before the student body Dean Smith took occasion to compliment the faculty on the excellent work being done in both the elementary and high school departments. Many progressive movements have been undertaken at this school during the past few years, one of which is to increase the already splendid library. All of the visitors were very much impressed with the program given by one of the societies and supervised by the faculty. The faculty has the confidence of the community as well as its cooperation which fact has enabled great things to be accomplished. Miss Gladys Atwood, an old T.P.I. student, is very favorably remembered by those who taught her at T.P.I. one of the teachers in the Alexandria elementary school. President Smith visited Carthage recently in the interest of Tech. Dean Smith has been accused of being a raging Democrat since his chapel oration for the World Court. A few more days of work before Christmas. Let’s make them count. School will be demised for holidays December 18th, and everyone will be off for a happy Christmas. Have a delightful time, and be back ready for work December 29th. We are glad indeed to note that Mr. Passon’s father is improving, and we wish him a speedy recovery. The deepest regret of the Campus girls is that Quentin, Jr., is not large enough to chauffeur his dad’s new Studebaker. Frame your mind to mirth and merriment. Which bars a thousand harms, and lengthens life. –Shakespeare. Y.W.C.A. NOTES The Y.W.C.A. sent two delegates to the Christian Students’ Conference at Chattanooga, Nov. 27, 1925. The delegates, Miss Auby Scott and Miss Ruth Weaver, reported the conference as being marked by enthusiasm and inspiring discussions. The World Court was the main topic considered, the leaders and students strongly advocating America’s entering into it. The President of the Y.W.C.A. at T.P.I. urges all students to study this important question in order that they may be prepared to vote intelligently on December 4. When we are in the satisfaction of some innocent pleasure, or pursuit of some laudable design, we are in possession of life. Few things are impossible to diligence and skill. It is the height of folly to throw up attempting because you have failed. Failures are wonderful elements in developing the character. --Muller. “But pleasures are like oppies spread— You seize the flower, its bloom is shed.” THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute\ Printed by the Herald Publishing Co. Entered as Second class matter at the Cookeville Postoffice, Cookeville, Tenn. EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief Bryce D. Stone ‘26 Assistant Editor Edward McKay ‘27 ASSOCIATE EDITORS Athletics M. Douglas Robbins ‘27 Wit and Humor David Dow ‘29 Exchange Elizabeth Ensor ‘28 Classes Martha Sedivak ‘27 Society Shella Officer ‘29 Alumni Hazel Wall ‘27 Mary Crenshaw ’26 Literary Editor Faculty Advisor Thos. L. Passons BUSINESS Business Manager Lee S. Darwin ‘27 Asst. Cir. Manager Nola Quarles ‘27 Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY LIFE PURPOSE The busy world shows angrily aside The man who stands with arms akimbo set Until occasion tells him what to do And he who waits to have his task marked out She’ll die and leave his errand unfulfilled He who floats lazily down the stream in pursuit of something borne along by the same current, will find himself indeed moved forward; but unless he lays his hand to the oar and “speeds up” by his own labor, he must be always about the same distance from that which he is following. In the voyage of life we must not drift but steer. Every youth should form, at the outset of his career, the solemn purpose to make the most and the best of the powers given him and to turn to the best possible account every outward advantage within his reach. This purpose must carry with it the assent of reason, the approval of the conscience and the sober judgement of the intellect. It should then embody within itself whatever is vehement in desire, inspiring in hope, thrilling in enthusiasm and intense in desperate resolve. Such a plan of life will save him from many a damaging contest with temptation. It will regulate his sports and recreations. Those who labor and study under the inspiration of such a purpose will soon soar out of sight of those who barely allow themselves to be carried along by the momentum of the machinery to which they are attached. In nothing is childhood more strongly distinguished from manhood than in this, that the child has no purpose, no plan in life, no will by which his energies are directed. The man has his own purpose, his own plan, his own life and aim. The sorrowful experience of multitudes in this respect is that they are never men but children all their days. Think out your work then work out your thought. No one can pursue a worthy object, with all the powers of his mind, and make his life a failure. A man may work in the dark, yet one day light shall arise upon his labor; and though he may never with his own lips declare the victory complete someday others will behold in his life work the traces of a great and thinking mind. What a different place this would be if other activities were given as much thought as Athletics. And yet it requires both sides to develop a student properly. WHY GO TO COLLEGE? As a variation from the regular contents of this column we are printing an article on the "Honor System." This is the system of student government in most of our large colleges- and as such should 'be of interest to any student who contemplates entering college. —Editor. WHAT DOES THE HONOR SYSTEM INVOLVE? The term "honor system" is used to indicate the formal recognition and adoption by students and faculty of a system of mutual responsibility among students for honest scholastic work. The purpose of this system is to enlist the co-operation of students for the maintenance of fair play and honesty or preparation and performance of classroom activities. The immediate and ultimate aims of the honor system which may be considered of most significance are: It rests fundamentally upon the initiative of undergraduates, and initiative always has potential good as a possibility: it is dependent upon unity of purpose and community of effort, which is another valuable asset when turned in the right direction: it tends to bring a frank and candid relation between the students and the administrative force of an institution: it tends toward increasing the loyalty to an institution, by strengthening public opinion in regard to the virtue of honesty: it increases individual responsibility, which may take a marked drop during college days: it breeds confidence and self-respect in similar situations: as a rule it appeals to the better class of students, and leads them to look at their own actions and the actions of other fellows from the point' of view of an adult: it utilizes the stronger characters to help bolster up the weaker ones. Student government is a term used to indicate that the administration of the college, as far as student activities are concerned, is in the hands of students. The honors system is in reality a subdivision of student government and is usually an indication of a highly developed form a student government. It may cover all forms of student activities and conduct, or it may involve the examination only. However, it loses in efficiency when applied to too wide a range of activities. The operation of this system usually involves the signing of a pledge neither to give nor to receive help, but in some colleges it would be considered an insult to be asked to sign a pledge. There is a considerable disagreement among the claimant for the credit of having initiated the first well-defined honor system in an educational institution of higher learning in this country. The University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, has almost universally been credited with being the originator. The faculty minutes of May 4. 18f2, show the formal adoption of the organized system in this institution. The University of South Carolina. and the College of William, and Mary practiced the honor sys, tern in an informal way before 1842, but the University of Virginia was the first to inaugurate a definite system of control, legislation, and form of penalties. According to a survey made in 1915, 123 institutions practice the honor system in all or a few departments. Some authorities claim that this system is more successful in small colleges than in large ones. In the larger universities, the honor system is independent of any form of student government. In the smaller colleges, it is the natural outgrowth of the participation of students in the direction and control of their various collegiate activities. Many institutions have an honor system in vogue spirit but not in organization: while others favor it, but the sentiment is not sufficiently mature to put it into practice. The 123 institutions that are trying the system are its strongest advocates, and there has been a steady but marked tendency toward general adoption throughout this country. Some authorities regard the honor system as the only agency that will prevent cheating in examinations. To secure the best results from any form of the honor system, both student and faculty sentiment should be in favor of its adoption and it is most successful when the initiative for' its adoption comes from the students. Students, must be willing to accept the obligation of reporting any - student who violates the system. Violations of 4 the honor system should consist of any attempt to receive assistance front written aids or from any person, or paper, or in any attempt to give assistance, whether the one so doing has completed his own paper or not. Offenders must be treated kindly but justly. A cheating student dishonors his whole class and lowers the tone of the college. It is. the duty of the students of the college where this system is practiced to see that no dishonest paper ever goes into the hands of an instructor and to make it impossible for stolen work to receive credit or for hilt to remain permanently in the college. An administrative council, composed of students and faculty, should give decisions on violations of this system. Final jurisdiction in regard to penalties is very successfully administered in a number of large institutions by the students but in general it is better to have this power rest ultimately with the faculty or the board of trustees. There must be hearty cooperation between students and () faculty. In adopting the honor system the students are given to understand that the faculty assume that they can be trusted. Therefore, the instructor may or may not be present during the examination. If he is present, he is there the purpose of giving instructions and making the examination dear. It is not possible to recommend a single type of constitution for organization of 'the hem& system, hut 'the constitution and by-laws should be short, simple, and definite, since new and untried students must be educated yearly. Likewise every two or three years. The people who oppose the honor system are greatly in the minority. Their chief arguments against it may be summed up as follows: Classroom honesty is an academic matter; some people believe, therefore, that it should be under faculty jurisdiction and control. Some executives do not care to give. more control to students since these duties are difficult to define and Lake the students' time from the regular studies. Students contend also that it tends to burden the better or more honest students with the shortcomings of the delinquent ones. In some communities there is a sentiment that signing a pledge implies dishonesty, and in many institutions there is still a feeling that individual honor does not involve the reporting of theft and dishonest on the part of others. Some large institutions have such a cosmopolitan group of students that homogeneity in the classroom ideals is difficult to secure and maintain small institutions have younger preparatory students to include in their regulations. But, on the other hand. a large majority of the college and university authorities have the same idea as Prof. Edward S. Joyner of the University of South Carolina who wrote that "the only true system for the education of a gentleman by gentlemen is the honor system—that is, the system of mutual respect and confidence." The success of the honor system is due in the main to the natural desires of the students to formulate ideals for themselves, the interest for co-operative activity and teamwork and the pride involved in creating college public sentiment and college loyalty. NOTICE—In making up the first page we accidentally got five lines of the basketball write-up at the foot of the first column story of the Glee Clubs, omitting these five lines the story read right on. –Printer. PALLADIAN LITERARY SOCIETY Whereas, God in his infinite wisdom has seen' fit to call from earth the father of our, beloved society member, Charlotte Watson; and, Whereas, we deem it fitting and proper that we should give expression to our love and affection for her in her bereavement in the form of resolution; Therefore, be it resolved; That we the members of the Palladian Literary Society desire to express our genuine appreciation for her and to extend our sympathy to her and her mother. Be it further resolved that a copy of these resolutions be sent to the family a copy to the press, and a copy spread on the minutes of the society. HAZEL WALL, Chairman, MARTHA SEDIVAK, REBECCA JOHNSTON, MARY ELLEN SHANKS, Committee on Resolutions. December 2, 1925 SHERWOOD Sherwood Literary Society met in the regular meeting room, Monday Nov. 30th, 1925th, and rendered the following program; Invocation –Bill Gentle The roll was answered with a Bible quotation. Debate; resolved, that the development of a pleasing personality while in college is more important than the acquisition of facts. Affirmative –Alvin Jackson, Tim Huddleston. Negative—A. Clark, Jack Morrison Current Events. BELLES LETTRES In spite of the fact that about half our girls are preparing to entertain "Professor Pepp" in the near future, we had a very interesting, though impromptu, program on Nov. 30, Often an informal meeting calls forth more activity and arouses more enthusiasm than the regulation program. Let's each act as a committee of one solely responsible for the advertising of "Professor Pepp." Tell everybody and send word to the rest. UPPER CUMBERLAND The Upper Cumberland Society met in its regular meeting room Monday, Nov. 30th. This day had been set aside •for the election of officers for the coming term the following officers were elected: Jesse R. Clark President. Earl Tipps Vice-President Wm. S. Massa Secretary Robert E. Smith Treasurer Monroe Powers Attorney-General Sewell Brown Sergeant-at-Arms Douglas Robbins Critic Each elected officer expressed his appreciation and promised to serve to the best of his ability. With such a body of officers as we now have, next term promises to be one of the best in the history of our society. We wish to express our appreciation for the retiring officers, as they have served faithfully and well. Let's go Upper Cumberlands and make the spirit ring. PALLADIAN SOCIETY The Palladian Society dispenses with their regular Monday afternoon program and elected the following officers for the second term; Pres Martha Sedivak Vice-Pres Rozelle Pendergrass Secretary Elise Gregory Treasurer Agnes Greenwood Critic Hazel Wall Yell Leader Louise Woods With these competent leaders, the work of the society during the second term will be promoted. JOKES Elsic –What is the matter with your hand? Puckett –I was down town getting some cigarettes and some bum stepped on it. Martha (at Football game) –So the players wear numbers for their identification. Dan –Yes. Martha – I didn’t know they were killed enough for that. Merrill –Will you marry me? Dan –Yes. Merrill –But the doctor says my life will be short. Dan –Is it insured? Mary Ellen Shanks –Eddie, what are you going to give me for Christmas? Eddie –Close your eyes. (She closes her eyes). Now what do you see? Mary ellen –Nothing. Eddie –Well that’s what you are going to get. Health Inspector –Is this a fraternity house? Senior –Yes. Health Inspector –Are there any rats around? Senior –No, they died of starvation. Victim –you’ve pulled three teeth. I only wanted one pulled Dentist –Yes, Yes, we gave you a bit too much gas a I didn’t want to waste it. Man in speeding car –High fence isn’t it? Driver –that’s no fence, them’s telephone poles. Rose –I had a tooth pulled this morning. Clark –did you have an anesthetic? Rose—No, a toothache.

1925 December 14

 The Tech Oracle BASEBALL PRACTICE BEGINS NEW TERM OPENS WITH INCREASE IN ENROLLMENT College Classes receive most of new students Since the opening of the Spring quarter on March 8th, fifty-six new students have enrolled for work at Tech, bringing the total enrollment to 303. Forty eight of the new students are of college grade. We now have 173 students in the college department and 130 in the high school. The following new students have registered this term: High School Ethel Hogan, Oliver Bussell, Eunice Barnette, Hattie Brown, Hallie Brown, Emma Carr, Vallie Carr, Nan Sewell. College Hogan W. Dudley, Edward L. Poore, Robert, Howard Turner, Loraine Huddleston, Edith Windle, Christyne McCormick, Margaret Darwin, Bernice Hogan, Myrtle Marcom, Anna Kate Scott, Clara Bilbrey, Nannie Myers, Lucile Gist, Truman Richardson, Pearl Clark, Eunice Smith, Anna Denton, Flo Donaldson, Fannie Whitaker, Notie McCormick, Pauline Sparkman, Eva Clayton, Tillman Phillips, Edith Spear, Ruth Hogan, Wililie, Mai Ray, Mrs. Elizabeth Hammer, Lydia Wheat, William Hammer, Lena Holman, Mary Breeding, Anna Ruth Grimes, Bessie gentry, Leonard E. Crawford, Effie Judd, Beecher Frazier, Francis Dunavin, Gladys Bohannon, Louise Cornwell, Della Lemons, Lester King, Eleanor Haile, Paul J. Moore, Rose Dow, Thelma High, Adina Crowder, Herman Langford. EUROPEAN TOUR THE REWARD OF ORATORY A personally conducted tour of Europe during the summer of 1926 is offered this year, instead of a cash prize, to the seven finalists in the 1926 national oratorical contest, according to recent announcement of the director. These student contests are financed by representative newspapers in the United States to promote better and more intelligent citizenship. Last year, it is estimated more than a million and a third highschool boys and girls participated in the state contests leading up to the final test in Washington City in June. A somewhat similar contest, but entirely independent was conducted in 1925 in Mexico. The contest this year has assumed an international character not only in the award of a personally conducted European tour for the seven successful contestants in the United States, but independently conducted national contests will be held in () Canada, England, Mexico, France, and Germany, culminating in meeting in Washington next October of the national winners. Each nation’s contestant will discuss the governmental contribution of his own country. The director of the contests in the United States is also international director. In the United States the subject, as heretofore, will focus on constitutional government. The seven finalists will sail from New York City, July 3, and all expenses for their tour expect for passport and personal expenditures will be met by the 26 metropolitan newspapers sponsoring the project. SHERWOOD DEBATERS CHOOSE NEGATIVE SIDE OF QUESTION On Wednesday, March 10th, the Sherwood debating team, composed of Leslie Myers and Tim Huddleston announced that they would defend the negative of the question for the annual intersociety debate which is: “Resolved, that state boards of arbitration with compulsory power should be established throughout the United States to settle labor disputed in public utilities” The affirmative team is Douglas Robbins and Charles Davis who represent the Upper Cumberland Literary Society. The debate will be held on Friday evening May 14. INTERESTING NEWS FROM THE EDUCATIONAL WORLD Almost two-thirds of the student body of Transylvania College, Kentucky, earn by their own labor, all or part of their college expenses. A school for the training of colored librarians has been established at Hampton Institute, Va., through the cooperation of the Carnegie Foundation. One year of college training is required for entrance. A loan fund to amount to not less than $10,000 for assisting students in four Class A normal schools in Alabama, has been established by the Birmingham News. The fund is to be administered by the presidents of these institutions. TENNIS TO BE MADE INTERCOLLEGIATE SPORT AT TECH The department of Athletics announces that a certain sum shall be spent for the promotion of tennis during the spring quarter. This will make it possible for Tech to compete officially with other colleges in tennis for the first time in the history of our school. The audition of tennis as a regular sport is made possible by the increased returns from the Basketball Tournament held this year. Mr. Passons, Treasurer of Athletic Council, reports that the Athletic Association began the school year with $777.00, in the treasury. At present the amount is $920.00. The officials of the Association plan to make baseball as nearly self-supporting as possible by collecting from every person who witnesses a game. This plan will be difficult to enforce until we have a fence erected around the playing field. In view of this condition all book agents and other individuals who possess extraordinary ability as collectors are asked to be ready for mobilization at a moment’s notice. Recent legislative action will greatly increase the income of the University of Porto Rico. A Federal Bureau of Education, similar to the United States Bureau of education, for the purpose of collecting and diffusing information respecting education generally, is urged for Australia by the Australian Teachers’ Federation. SQUAD HAS FIRST WORK OUT ON TUESDAY Three Men Return From Last Year’s Team The initial practice for the baseball season of 1926 was held Tuesday afternoon, March 16th. The men trying out for the team and their positions are as follows. Pitchers: Moss, Denny, Lewis, Gates and McDonald. Catchers: Winningham and Mayfield First Basemen: Moss, Gates and Richardson. Second Basemen: Joiner, Richardson and Whittaker. Short Stop: Watson, Little and Stringfield. Third Basement: Davis, Lewis and Little. Outfielders: Brown, Hogan, Gill. Moore, Gates, Davis and Stringfield. The letter men from last year’s team are: Watson Winningham and Denny. These three will form the nucleus of this year’s squad. Not much is known of the newcomers with the exception of Moss, who has a brother now playing with Brooklyn, and who comes to us well recommended. Let us hope so at any rate, for a lack of pitchers of good caliber has been one of Tech’s greatest troubles in her baseball teams of the past. Among the others who will bear watching are: Lewis, Gates, Brown, Little, Davis, Whittaker and McDonald. The 1926 schedule follows: Baseball Schedule April 2 –Monterey –here. April 5 –Defiance College, Ohio. –Here. (Pending) April 7-8 –Bryson College –There. April 14-15 –Bethel or Ogden –Here. April 23-24 –Bethel or Ogden –There. April 27-28 –Cumberland –There. May 1—Open –Here. May 7-8 –M.T.T.C. –There. May 10-11 –Cumberland –Here. May 19-20 –M.T.T.C. –Here. REVIEW OF BASKETBALL SEASON In recapitulating Tech’s basket ball season just past, it will probably be proper to begin with those who made it what it was –the Squads. Whether the season shall be termed successful, or not, the fact remains that any period of athletic activity is largely what a team makes it, that the results obtained can only be measured in terms of the effort put forth. For that reason as the whether or not the season was successful only the players themselves and probably the coaches know. I know no better way present () ing the squads other than by giving a brief critical sketch of each member of their merits shortcomings and possibilities for the future as I see them. I shall first review the men’s varsity and then take up the Co-eds. First and foremost, of course, should always be the captain. And the captain of the squad of ’26 is no exception. Jobe was not only the highest point-maker in almost every game on the schedule, but also played the floor in great style Jobe has in all probability played his last game for Tech, and I am sure the student body joins heartily in wishing him “good luck” wherever he may go. Moss at center was good on close shots and worked the floor nicely. With a little more careful handling of the ball he should develop into a mainstay for the Tech team of ’27. Lewis, stocky and fast forward, was also good on close shots. His floor work was rather spotted at the start, but constantly improved as the season progress. He should also rate the squad of ’27. Winningham, regular forward at the start of the season, was forced out in the Cumberland game of Jan. 27, and was unable to engage in the remainder of the schedule. He is likewise a good floor worker and excellent on short shots. Watson, a regular at running guard to begin the season, was also forced out very early because of sickness and was unable to return to the fold. With better luck next year he should easily merit a regular berth on the varsity. Davis, the man in the hole, filled the place vacated by Alcorn of last year’s team in a very efficient manner. He has a tendency to be drawn too far out at times which he will no doubt corrector for the future. R. Robbins running guard, handles the ball very well and works the floor in a fairly creditable manner. However, he seemed unable to locate the basket this year a fault which he will also have to correct. M.L. Robbins, light and fast forward work the floor fairly well and is fairly accurate on his shots most of which were made at a distance. He needs experience, however, to improve his game from all stand points and to correct a fault of too little mixing. Denny, guard and center, has the makings of a future Tech basket ball star. He now is fairly accurate of his shots, but needs more experience to round out of his game. Carr, guard and forward, is also full of possibilities. He is now fairly accurate on close up shots, but needs to improve his floor work. The varsity won from East Nashville “Y” Bethel College twice, Ogden College and Bowling Green Business university. They lost to Cumberland twice, Ogden B.G.B. U.M.T.T.C. and the Guaranty Trust Collegians of Cincinnata. The Collegians, who beat Vandy eight points and the Ramblers twelve, were only able to increase their margin over us by two. It is needless to say that Coach Overall Handled the team in a very creditable manner. The Co-Ed Squad Miss Lucy Whitson, captain and center of the Co-ed team, was in all probability the most valuable member of her team, as I have said before, the captain should be. She worked the floor well was good on her shots, and in most instances was tall enough to get the tip off she is undoubtedly one of the best centers in the state. Miss Shipley, fast forward, was the high scorer of the season for the Co-eds; worked the floor well, and in fact had all one could wish for in a girl basket ball player except height. She also must rate as one of the best in the state. Miss Shanks, another fast forward, worked the floor fairly well, but was not so accurate as Miss Shipley in her shooting. She needs more experience to round out her game. Miss Moore without doubt is one of the best guards we have ever had. Her only trouble seems to be an inability to break fast. With more experience, however, she should be able to correct this fault. Miss McKeel, guard and forward worked the floor in a very creditable manner, but her shooting was very inferior to her floor game. She should also improve with more experience. Miss Annie Pearl Whitson substitute forward has the makings of a future Tech regular. She is fast, but needs considerable experience to improve her game from all angles. Miss Starnes fitted very nicely into the guard position this year. Like the majority of the others she needs more experience to improve her game, especially in getting the ball away quicker. The Co-eds won from Cumberland, Nashville “Y” twice and Logan College. They lost to M.T.T>C. Cumberland, Carson New-man, and Maryville. Miss McClanahan has built up to a great extent a system that speaks big things for the future teams of Tennessee Tech. The basketball tournament sponsored by Tech and held March 4, 5, and 6 was a great success from all standpoints. Fourteen visiting teams were the guests of Tech and had ample opportunity to become acquainted with the line of work Tech is endeavoring to accomplish. Many of the players have already signified their intention of starting their college career with this institution. Alpine won the tournament and Livingston academy was a runner up. And everyone had a big time. UPPER CUMBERLANDS AND PALLADIANS The first program given by the Upper Cumberland and Palladian Literary Societies this term for the new students was very interesting. It consisted of the following numbers: Things we would like to see Rose Dow Scenes from an Art Gallery Cave Man Charles Davis Cave Woman Eunice Allen Mother Ursula Rubye McKeel Execution of Mary, Queen of Scots Elsie Young John Smithe Robert Smith Pocahontas Mary Ellen Shanks Colonial Elise Gregory and Mayme Gibson Flapper Thelma McCormick Also some costumed clog dances were given: University High Clog Thelma McCormick and Lillian Pointer Old Man Pauline Hudgens, Rozelle Pendergrass and Llewyn Johnson Dixie Amy Shipley Many new students were present and after the program games were played and delicious refreshments were served. SPECIAL MUSIC IN CHAPEL Wednesday morning of each week the music department tries to put on something of musical interest and value as well as entertainment for the student body. At present the different kinds of voices are being illustrated. The first voice illustrated was the Mezzo-Soprano, by using victrola records of different arts. Wednesday morning, March 10, the student body was delighted to have as guests, Mrs. Howard and Mrs. Carlen. Mrs. Howard, a pianist of unusual ability, gave “Love Dream” by Liszt and an arrangement of the “The Arkansas Traveler” by Burg. As an encore, she gave “Juba Dance” by Dett, a rollicking clog dance. Mrs. Carlen a lyric soprano of note gave several beautiful songs, “Love’s in my heart” “My Lindy Lou” and her favorite “The Bird and the Babe.” She gave “The False Prophet” as an encore. Tuition fees in the state secondary schools of Czechoslovakia are graded according to the incomes of the parents of pupils. THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Printed by The Herald Publishing CoEntered as second class matter at the Cookeville Postoffice, Cookeville, Tenn. EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief Bryce D. Stone ‘26 Assistant Editor Edward McKay ‘27 Assistant Editor Nola Quarles ‘27 ASSOCIATE EDITORS Athletics M. Douglas Robbins ‘27 Wit and Humor Robert Ensor ‘28 Exchange Elizabeth Ensor ‘28 Classes Martha Sedivak ‘27 Society Shelia Officer ‘29 Alumni Hazel Wall ‘27 Faculty Advisor Thos L. Passons BUSINESS Business Manager Lee S. Darwin ‘27 Assistant Bus. Mgr. J. Fred Terry ‘27 CIRCULATION Circulation Manager J.D. Miller ‘27 Asst. Cir. Manager David Terry ‘29 Asst. Cir. Manager Willis Huddleston Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI MONTHLY TACT Tact is the secret of getting along with people. You will make more friends in a week by getting yourself interested in other people than you can in a year by trying to get people interested in you. If there are two or three of your acquaintances that you can’t get along with, it may be their fault; but if there are a dozen or more individuals who antagonize you continually, it is fault. Always remember that the other fellow’s actions are governed by what you do. For example, if someone calls you a liar you will respond in a certain way but if that same person calls you a good fellow you will respond in an entirely different manner. In brief do not push and command but lead and suggest. Abraham Lincoln would have a hard time getting into a modern university. Perhaps this is the reason there are so few Lincoln’s coming out of the big schools. Ten units of summer school or normal school study, at least six units of which must be strictly teacher-training study in the principles, theory, or practice of teaching are now required in addition to high school graduation, before a resident of Nevada may obtain a third-grade certificate. An extensive school building campaign is in progress in a number of counties in Alabama. At present more than 100 buildings many of them handsome structures of brick or stone, are in process of erection through aid granted by the State Department of Education. COLLEGE SERVICE AND WORTH A college which serves its locality better than does the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute can hardly be found. Each year hundreds of city and rural students are enrolled in this institution and encouraged to remain in school and complete a course leading to some profession. T.P.I. is growing and it is growing rapidly. More of the real college spirit is apparent each term. The standard of scholarship is steadily being raised. Work done in this institution meets the most exacting requirements of larger and older colleges. The students who later enter other colleges find their work recognized without question. T.P.I. means something to the state of Tennessee and particularly to this Upper Cumberland Region. Were it not for the existence of T.P.I. most of the young men and women in this section of the State would never advance beyond high school. They would have a less clear conception of the advantages of a college education, and consequently, they would feel like inducement to go to more distant parts of the State in search of a college within their means. This year the faculty is redoubling its efforts toward selling T.P.I. to itself and to the people who can be benefited by T.P.I. Direct encouragement is being given to students in the high school graduating classes in schools throughout this part of the state. A live “Go to College Campaign” has been spiritedly inaugurated by T.P.I. this year. As a result of this campaign many people are getting acquainted with T.P.I. and learning of its growth and educational significance. Chief among the ways of getting in touch with new friends is the plan of giving a free subscription to the “Tech Oracle” to all members of high school graduating classes in the many high schools in this district, T.P.I. wants higher education to be the aim of every high school graduate Fourth year students in over thirty schools are receiving the “Tech Oracle” regularly. Approximately three hundred such students are becoming better acquainted with T.P.I. in this way. In the next issue of this paper there will be a comparison of the courses of study and expenses of this institution with those of other institutions in the state. There frequently arise questions as to expenses and entrance requirements that cannot be well answered in a general discussion. If such questions are sent to this paper, we will gladly print the answers and each subscriber will have advantage of the information. A RECENT VISITOR Miss Louise Forman the Student Secretary of the Southern Baptist Convention gave a very inspiring as well as interesting talk at Chapel Tuesday morning, March 9th. The keynote of her address was “Today and Tomorrow with Jesus Christ.” Using this as a foundation, she in her own undefinable way showed us how essential it is for us to spend our “Todays and Tomorrows with Jesus Christ.” RULES FOR THE LIBRARY 1. A fine of 5c a day will be imposed for each day that an ordinary book is kept over time, the fine to be paid when the book is returned. If the book is lost, the borrower shall pay the cost of the book the fines accumulated at the time the loss is discovered. 2. Reference books cannot be taken out until 4 o’clock and must be returned at 8 o’clock the following day. 3. Books must be signed out for if not taken out of the library. 4. Magazines, newspapers, and other books on the reference shelf must be replaced when read. 5. Serious offenses such as the tearing of magazines or theft of books are punishable by suspension or expulsion of the offender, who shall also be required to replace the material. 6. Any book may be recalled at any time by the librarian. 7. Talking when necessary must be in a whisper 8. Students must have special permission to use the stacks or search for materials in magazines 9. Reference books cannot be kept longer than one hour in the room. 10. 10 if reference books are not returned by eight o’clock a fine of 10c an hour will be imposed. 11. Fiction may be kept out 7 days. Twenty-eight male instructors for boys at the Pennsylvania Industrial Reformatory have enrolled for the study of pedagogy in extension classes conducted by the Pennsylvania State College. Eighteen educational surveys in eight States –Kentucky, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee Virginia, and West Virginia –were made by the Interior Department, Bureau of Education, during the fiscal year 1924-25. FACULTY MAN WINS CONTEST A very interesting “Know Tennessee” contest was held at the City School building, Saturday evening, March 14th. The contestants were: Dr. W.S. McClain, Grover C. Boyd, J.M. Hatfield and Paul Moore, Dr. McClain and Mr. Boyd were selected from town, Mr. Hatfield was chosen from T.P.I. faculty, and Mr. Moore from T.P.I. student body. The winner of this contest was Mr. Hatfield who represented Cookeville in the divisional contest at Nashville. Think and Grin Martha: “Does skating require any particular application?” Sewell: “No, arnica or horse linement –one’s as good as the other.” Robert Smith: “But say, what must I do if they ask me to sing?” Douglas Robins: “Do? Why sing of course, it’ll be their own fault.” Mr. Passons (jocularly): “Do you know anything worse than a giraffe with a stiff neck?” David Terry: “Yes sir.” Mr. Passons: “What?” David: “A centipede with corns” Mr. McClanahan: “In what battle did General Wolf when hearing of victory cry ‘I die Happy.’” Houston Haile: “I think it was his last battle.” Clarence Duke: “My brother sure was a dumb guy.” Frank Hall: “How’s that?” Clarence Duke: “They had to burn down the school house to get him out of the first grade.” Miss Harden: “I have a ford. What car have you?” Rich Friend: “A Packard.” Miss Harden: “Well that’s a good car, too.” Experienced Employer: Have you ever done any night work? Jobe: Yes, sir; I courted for two years. Charles Davis (to passing motorist): Hi, mister, I’m going your way! Motorist: So I see, but I’ll get there before you do. He (having just kissed her): Ah! That was indeed a triumph of mind over matter! She: Yes, I didn’t mind because you don’t matter. Doctor (to fair patient): You certainly have acute appendicitis. Danie Wright: Oh, Doctor, you flatter me. Teacher (Mr. A.W.): Your answer is as clear as mud. Martha Sedivak: Well, that covers the ground, doesn’t it? Mamie Gibson: My dear, you have made a bad job of putting your paint on this morning. Charlotte Watson: Yes, honey, I’ll admit I’m somewhat of an amateur –you see, I haven’t been putting it on as many years as you have. Pauline: Paul, if you don’t stop I’ll scream –I’ll call mother! Mother! Mother! Oh, my goodness, Paul here she comes. I never dreamed she was at home. He (after a quarrel): I think our lips are parallel, don’t you? She: I don’t know. Why? He: Because they never meet. Agitated Old Lady: Quick, my daughter is drowning. Save her and she shall be your wife. R.T. Little Wait till she rolls over. I want to see her face. TENNIS TALK At last tennis is to be recognized as a minor sport at Tennessee Tech Plans are on foot to put tennis at Tech on a sound basis, and to provide recreation for at least fifty students who might not otherwise get it. the fact is that there are many more who could be encouraged to take part but for lack of courts. Tech needs at least five good courts and should have them in the near future. However, we must make out with the ones that we have for this year, and partly with that end in view a set of rules have been made out and approved of by the coaches, the manager, and the president. It is to be hoped that every person who engages in tennis will do his utmost to abide by the rules, and thus help pave the way for more and better tennis at Tech. a small beginning in the way of a tennis team is to be attempted this yea, but plans as to its extent are not as yet complete. Miss McClanahan has been appointed director for tennis and will personally supervise all tennis activities. A copy of the rules follows: 1. Each player shall furnish his own racket and balls. 2. Each player shall wear heelless rubber soled shoes while using courts. 3. Each player or group of players shall obtain a permit from the attendant in charge to use the courts at a certain hour. 4. No player or group of players shall use the courts more than one hour each day unless the courts are vacant. 5. The attendant in charge shall not issue permits in such a way as to provide a monopoly of the courts by any players or set of players. 6. Doubles must be played when more than four are waiting. 7. The courts may be used after three o’clock on each day in the week except Saturday in Sundays . on Sundays they may be used any time after eight A.M. On Sundays not at all. 8. A tournament to decide the singles and doubles champions for both men and women shall be played the fourth week end in each year after the courts are officially announces as in conditions 9. The number eligible for this tournament shall be; Men’s singles –eight; Men’s doubles, women’s singles, and doubles and mixed doubles –four. The eligibility shall be determined as follows: For the first three week-ends after courts are declared in condition all participants in tennis activities shall be watched in action by the coaches. The coaches shall then confer and select an eligibility list on the merits of the players seen in action. This list will compose those eligible fo the annual tournament. 10. All entrants in the annual tournament shall pay an entrance fee of fifty cents payable at least two days before the tournament begins. 11. The three coaches of Tech shall pick a team to represent the school after and according to the playing shown in the annual tournament. 12. The attend in charge will be appointed by the Tennis Director and manager and shall be subject to their authority Carolyn McClanahan, Tennis Director, R.M Smith, Athletic Director P.V. Overall Ass’t Athletic Director, M.D. Robbins, Tennis Manager, Q.M. Smith, Pres. Tennessee Tech. INTERESTING NEWS FROM THE EDUCATIONAL WORLD A six weeks’ European tour for the study of representative newspapers in Canada, Great Britain, and on the Continent of Europe will be conducted next summer by the University of Wisconsin course in journalism Classes will be conducted on shipboard, and the students will be addressed in a number of places by representative foreign journalists. The platoon or work-study play plan of organization has been adopted by one or more public schools in 101 cities in 33 States. In addition, two private institutions, Carson and Girard Colleges in Pennsylvania, are operated on the platoon plan. A students’ residence or hostel, was recently dedicated with impressive ceremonies in Montevideo, Uruguay. The hostel is sponsored by a group of intellectuals to furnish a group of intellectuals to furnish home influences for students and to offer a center for the intellectual life of the community. To encourage thrift many savings banks in Czechoslovakia give to each new pupil in the elementary schools a passbook with a beginning credit of 1 krone. The schools of the country celebrate thrift day and impress upon the children that saving insures happiness and that industry and thrift mean prosperity for the individual and for the national –school life. PATRONIZE ORACLE ADVERTISERS THE POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS By Mary Crenshaw Burns stated his special aim “to sing the sentiments and manners he felt and saw in himself and his rustic compeers around him in his and their native language.” He succeeded nobly in his aim for no poet has better sung the songs of the Scotch than he has. He is the great poet of rustic life and the representative Scotch poet. In a rural theme he is entirely in his element. He exhibits neither affection nor condescension and reality. He sings sweetly of his life and that of his fellow peasants in his realistic pictures, as well. He deals with the rustic beliefs of his own people, that is the poor class of country people in Scotland, and tells of their customs and idiosyncrasies. He did not have to look for themes they were all around him and he wrote as the spirit moved him. The most dominating of Burns characteristics is his individuality. He stands apart from all other writers; he defies classification. The writers; he defies classification. The preceding English poetry of the eighteenth century did not give the slightest prediction of the possibility of any one resembling him. He is a wild flower that grew up all by himself. There is only one Robert Burns. However numerous faults may be Carlyle says of him. “He is an honest man and an honest writer. In his success and his failures., in his greatness and his littleness, he is ever clear simple, true and glitters with no lustre but his own.” One of Burns’ best known long poems is “The Cotter’s Saturday Night” This poem is written in the Spenserian stanza. Although it is written in modern English it has a sprinkling of Scottish or Scott English terms. This is a true picture of Burns’ home. And it does justice to the sentiments and manners of the Scottish peasants in their more hallowed relations. It is one of the most beautiful poems in the English language describing home-life. A picture of Scotch life very different from that found in “The Cotter’s Saturday Night” is “Tam O’ Shanter.” This is a humorous tale of an inn and drunkards. It treats of the superstition of the people and especially of the witch who caught hold of the horse’s tail. But the poem is not all humorous for Burns takes time to give the lesson: “But pleasures are like poppies spread, You seize the flower, its bloom is shed; Or like the snow fall in the river, A moment white –then melts forever;” Another of his humorous poems is “The Address to the Devil.” This is a comic sketch of the doings of the evil personality. Two of his poems which show a sympathetic and beautiful under standing of Nature are “To a Mouse” and “To a Mountain Daisy.” In these he shows a love for all living and all lifeless things. The “Daisy” falls not unheeded under his ploughshare; nor the ruined nest of that “wee, cowering, timorous beastie,” cast forth, after all its provident pains, to “thole the sleety dribble and cranrench cauld.” But even more human than these is “A Man’s A Man For A That,” for it deals directly with mankind In this burns sounds the trumpet of democracy when he says, “It’s coming yet, for a’ that, That man to man, the world o’er, Shall brothers be for a’ that.” In discussing Burns’ poetry we can not forget his songs. He has written some of our most beautiful songs. Carlyne says, “By far the most finished, complete and truly inspired pieces of Burns are, without dispute, to be found song his “Songs.” He has a rich assortment of popular songs which well express the Scottish sentiment and emotion. Some of the most beautiful and best known are “Auld Lang Syne,” “Flow Gently Sweet Afton,” “Coming Thro the Rye,” and “John Anderson, My Jo” are both tributes to friendship, while “Flow Gently Sweet Afton” was written to the highland lassie, “Mary.” No one has written a finer tribute to Burns and his poetry than Oliver Wendell Holmes in the following stanza: “The Lark of Scotia’s morning sky; Whose voice may sing his praises? With Heaven’s own sunlight in his eye. He walked among the daisies, Till through the cloud of fortune’s wrong. He soared to fields of glory; But left his land her sweetest song And earth her saddest story.” THE CHARLESTON The Ashland Collegian student weekly of Ashland College, Ohio, deplores the moder dance and sees the country “Charleston Mad.” The editorial follows: “Among the worst in its dire effects of all the crass banalities that has invaded our indigenous dolichocephalic civilization is the essence of death, ‘the fateful and destructive Charleston. This dance not only contains all the moral depravity of which other popular dances have been incriminated by the zealous moralist, but to this one has been added the demonstrated destructibility of property. While ‘twenty-eight couples from as many different states –vie from each other with intricate steps, hops, and wiggles in the Charleston,’ and wiggles in the Charleston,’ and ‘After several hours of the manual labor and bends of the now famous dance, four couples were adjudged the best from their respective sections’; bans are put on the pernicious and ruinous dance in Ashland, Delaware, and other cities. “Besides shaking the buildings down in which the dance is performed it might be said that it also shakes the character of the participant. “If this is a civilized and progressive nation, why revert to an aboriginal tom-tom method of amusement? It is a travesty on contemporary intellectual life that such savagery should be introduced into a country which is manifestly the leading Christian country of the world. Why the nation that sailed the first successful aeroplane, produced the telegraph, perfected the radio, and made the world’s greatest resources accessible, should be enslaved by the f e t I s h I s m of Africa’s dark continent is inconceivable.” –The New Student Class attendance will not be compulsory during the second semester for senior students of superior scholarship in the Kansas State Agricultural College. This is an experiment at this institution, and if successful it is probable that the privilege of voluntary attendance will be extended. EXCHANGE COLUMN We are glad to have the following papers on our exchange list. All are placed on the Newspaper rack in the library. Tech students are urged to read and compared them with the Oracle. The Oaks Bowdon State Normal Bowdon, Ga. The Bethany Collegian Bethany College Bethany. West Va. The Broadcaster, Alcoa, Tenn. The Orange and Blue Carson Newman College, Jefferson City, Tenn. The Emory Wheel, Emory University Emory, Ga. The Purple and Gold, C.H.S., Clarksville, Tenn. The Central Star, Dickson County High School Dickson, Tenn. The Cardinal, Ogden College Bowling Green, Ky. The Hume Fogg High School, Nashville Tenn. Side Lines M.T.T.C., Murfreesboro, Tenn. The Pine Branch Vaidosta, Ga. The Babbler, David Lipscom College, Nashville, Tenn. The Bayonet, Tennessee Military Institute, Sweetwater, Tenn. The Sou’wester, S. P. U., Memphis, Tenn. The Brackety, Ack, Roanoke College, Maryville, Tenn. The Brackety, Ack, Roanoke College, Salem, Va. The Central High News, Central High School Nashville, Tenn. The Bethel College, Russellville, Ky. The Technique Georgia Tech, Atlanta, Georgia The Log Cabin Bethel College McKenzie, Tenn. The Chalk Line E.T.S.T.C. Johnson City, Tenn. L.A. Fax, Livingston Academy, Livingston, Tenn. Famous Sayings “I don’t know where I’m going but I’m on my way.” –Columbus “Keep the home fires burning.” –Nero. “The first hundred years are the hardest,” –Methuselah. “Keep your shirt on.” –Queen Elizabeth “Don’t lose you head.” –Queen Mary. “Treat ‘em rough.” –Henry VIII. “The bigger they are the harder they fall.” –David “It floats.” –Noah “You can’t keep a good man down.” –Jonah. “I’m strong for you, kid.” –Samson. --The Boston Evening Transcript Soft Jobs A barber in Moscow Horse doctor in Detroit Killing the fleas on goldfish Killing flies off a snow man. Sweeping leaves from a hall tree. Digesting the hole of a doughnut. Being night watchman on a sundial. Captain in the Swiss Navy, Manager of an ice house in Africa. Keeping the dust off Niagara Falls. Driving a street sprinkler in Venice. Assistant lineman for a wireless company Bathing suit censor on the Sahara desert. Keeping the grass cut at the North Pole. Humorous editor of the Congressional Record. Coaching the Glee Club in a deaf and dumb school. --The Bethel Collegian. THE ENGINEER Who comes with pencil sharpened keen, With profile long and sober, mlen, With Transit, Level Book and Tape And glittering axe to swat the state? THE ENGINEER Who sets the level, bends his spine Squints through the glass along the line, Swings both him arms at rapid gait, Yells, “Hold that Goldamed rod up straight?” THE ENGINEER Who raves and snorts like on insane Jumps in the air and claws his mane Whene’er he sees a scraper take A whack at his most cherished stake? THE ENGINEER Who says he’ll charge an even ten For stakes destroyed by mules and men While on all fours he tries in vain To find the vanished stake again? THE ENGINEER Who saws the air with maddened rage And turns with hate the figured page And then with patience out on Joint Ties in another reference point? THE ENGINEER Who calls it your unrivalled gall Where’er you kick for overhaul, And gives your spine a frigid chill Whene’er you spring an extra bill? THE ENGINEER Who deals with figures most profuse And tells you solid rock is loose, That hardpan is nothing more than loam, While gumbo is lighter than sea foam? THE ENGINEER Who, after all, commands our praise In spite of all his peculiar ways, While others harvest all the gains That spring from his profile brain? THE ENGINEER --The Clemson Tiger. Is This Education? I can solve quadratic equations, but I can’t keep my bank balance straight. I can read Goethe’s “Faust” in the original, but I cannot ask for a piece of bread in German. I can name the kings of England since the war of the roses, but I do not know the qualifications of the candidates in the coming election. I know the economic theories of Malthus and Adam Smith, but I cannot live without my income. I can recognize the “left-motif” of a Wagner opera, but I cannot sing a tune. I can explain the principles of hydraulics, but I cannot fix a leak in the kitchen faucet. I read the plays of Moffiere in the original, but I cannot order a meal in French. I have studied the psychology of James and Tichener, but I cannot control my own temper. I can conjugate Latin verbs, but I cannot write legibly. I can recite hundreds of lines of Shakespeare, but I do not know the Declaration of Independence, Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, or the Twenty third Psalm. The Sou’Wester. “We Strive To Please” Suppose we rouge; suppose we dance, Suppose we smoke and swear, Suppose we wear our dresses short And bob our golden hair. Suppose we stay out late at night, Drink cocktails –wine and gin, And do the Charleston with the ‘gang’ Til the slipper soles are thin. Suppose we let you kiss us In a parked car late at night, And do a lot of petting That we know is not quite right. Well –we thought you wanted petting And we thought you wanted “punch,” So we did the naughty nice things Just to be one of the bunch. But don’t you know –Oh, boys o’ mine. We’d get as big a thrill Out of watching clouds go rolling by While perched upon a hill. With daffoldils ad daisies A growing at our feet, A learn from lips of one we love That life is very sweet. We’d even wear the crinolines Our grandmothers used to wear, Read poems from old Tennyson And plays from Moliere. If we thot you wanted romance We’d give you what you crave But if you yearn for “burlesque” Then we have to dance and rave. For we simply strive to please you In the best way that we know, For you are e’er the audience And we the actors of the show! --The Bayonet. BELLES LETTRES LITERARY SOCIETY There was a call meeting of the Belles Lettres Literary Society on Tuesday afternoon, March 9th, for the purpose of electing officers for the Spring term. The following officers were elected: President Mary Tom Johnson Vice-President Marie Peters Secretary Juanita Montgomery Treasurer Ethel Anderson Chaplain Dixie Brown Sg’t-at-Arms Ruth VanHooser Critic Mary Cummins

1926 March 20

 We Are Working For A Bigger And Better Tech. Are You? THE TECH ORACLE SOCIETIES PREPARE FOR ANNUAL DEBATE Question Resolved, That the Muscle Shoals Power Plant Should be Leased to a Private Interest. The annual debate for this year, between the Sherwood and Upper Cumberland literary societies, will be staged on Friday evening. April 10. The question for discussion this year is, Resolved, That the Muscle Shoals power plant should be leased to a private interest. The Upper Cumberland who chose to uphold the affirmative, will be represented by Mssrs. Benton Mr. Carr and John M. Frazier. The Sherwoods taking the negative, are to be representative by Messrs. Dewitt T. Puckett and Benton Cantrell. All four of these men are college students, three of them being of the class of ’25. All are men of mature judgment and exceptionally able speakers. All are men of varied experience in literary society and educational work. Each one of the four is a former school teacher. Mr. Frazier, who claims Cleveland, Tenn., as his habitat, is a Tech graduate of the class of ’29. For the last two years he has been principal of the Clarkrange, Tnn, High School. Also, he attended Peabody in the Summer of 1924. He returns to Tech this year to complete the third-year-course. Mr. Carr,a native of our neighbor county, Overton, is a member of the Freshman College Class and a teacher and debater of wide experience. He represented the Upper Cumberland society in the annual debate in 1924. Mr. Puckett who proudly claims our neighboring hamlet, Silver Point, as his home, is likewise a Tech graduate of former years, finishing in 1924. He was a member of the faculty of Baxter Seminary in 1923-4. He also attended Peabody College in the Summer of () 1924. He represented the Sherwoods in the annual debate of 1928. Mr. Cantrell, who hails from Fentress county, famous as the home of Sergeant Alvin C. York, also graduating from Tech in 1923. In 1923-4 he was principal of the school at Twinton, Tenn. Therefore, it can readily be seen that the debate will not lag for lack of talent. The winning team will be awarded the Womack loving cup and will be entitled to hold it one year. The cup is now held by their Sherwoods their team having been victorious in 1924. The judges this year will be members of the faculty of the University of Tennessee. ALUMNI NEWS Henry Barger was here recently in the interest of the Tech Alumni Association, of which he is president. Mr. Barger still works with his old time “pep” and enthusiasm, in spite of the fact that he has just finished a forty five day session with the state legislature. We were glad to have him visit the school and speak to us at the chapel service. Victor McClain, at Tech graduate now working in New York City sends in his subscription to the Oracle with the following comment: “Am pleased to note that some of the old pep and spirit is getting back into the student body. May () your tournament become a great success.” We are glad to report tht the tournament was indeed a success. It might also be well to remark that we appreciate Mr. McClain’s interest in the school and its activities. His is an attitude that should prevail with every Tech alumnus. We need more like him. Harry Jenkins of Vanderbilt University has the following to say in regard to the Oracle of this year: “You are to be congratulated on the splendid progress you have made with the Oracle. This issue (the Freshman issue) is certainly an improvement over anything attempted last year, and there is no reason why Tech and Tech students should not be proud of their paper. It certainly seems that it is going to prove the success that was predicted for it last year –and no one is more interested in its advance than I.” It will be remembered that Mr. Jenkins was the first editor-in-chief of the Oracle and as such was an important factor in its early success. Ross Burton of the Institute class of 1920 is now practicing law in Miami, Florida. He is remembered by all old Tech students as an enthusiastic society worker, and a good student. Bonnie Hudson, graduate from Tech High School in 1921, is now a student at Maryville College. Ina Scott, class of ’21, is holding a position as dietician in the Presbyerian Hospital at New Orleans, La. Clemma Masters and Dero Darwin, (now Mr. and Mrs. D.A. Darwin), graduates from the Technical High School in 1922, are living happily together “down on the farm,” near Gainesboro. Bernice Wright, one time “Beau Brummel” of Tech, and a High School graduate in the class of 1920, is studying medicine in Memphis, Tenn. Editor’s Note: This Column of our paper is devoted exclusively to the interests of the alumni of the institution, and we shall be glad to print contributions from any graduate of Tech. GOLDEN EAGLES TRIUMPH OVER C.H.M.A. On Monday, Feb. 16, the Tech “Golden Eagles” journeyed to Lebanon and handed the Castle Heights quintet the smaller end of a 29-21 count.the game was fast and clean throughout. Wilson and McCracken were the stars for the Heights. Blount and Poteet were the scoring aces for Tech, while Alcorn was a bear in defense. Lineups: Tech Pos. C.H.M.A. Clark (2) F Wilson (6) Blount (7) F Selby (5) Jobe (6) C Jordan Winningham (6) G Cook (4) Alcorn (1) G Briston Substitutions: Tech –Poteet (7) for Clark. Heights –Gordon for Selby; Bristow for Jordan; McCracken (6) for Cook; Smith for Bristow. TECH SWAMPED BY S.P.U. On Saturday night, Feb. 21, the far-famed Jess Neely brought his basketeers from S.P.U. to town and carried away the cup of victory through a 30-13 margin Alexander was the shining light of the game, scoring 12 points and pulling some very comical stunts. The first half ended with S.P.U. holding a 14-12 lead, but Tech was only able to register one point in the latter period. Joe Davis, a former Tech gridster, was on the visiting team and played well. Lineups: Tech Pos. S.P.U. Clark F Newton (6) Blount (6) F Perrine (4) Jobe (4) C Alexander (12) Winningham (1) G Wilson (4) Puckett (1) G Gardner Substitutions: Tech –Poteet (1) for Puckett; Carr for Poteet; Poteet for Clark; Puckett for Carr; Clark for Winningham. S.P.U. –Davis (4) for Perrine; Hall for Gardner. The Y.W. Tea Room is open every day from 12 to 1. Come. Y.M.C.A. PRESENTS INTERESTING PROGRAM The Y.M.C.A. meets on each Wednesday evening. Much interest is being shown this term as we have good numbers and good interest at each meeting. February 18, at the regular meeting the leaders were John Frazier, C.W. Davis, Benton Carr. Each made interesting talks. The president appointed for the following Wednesday night as leaders. Benton Cantrell and Ban McDearman. They also responded with interesting speeches. It might be of interest to know that every boy in the dormitories is a member of this organization and stands ready to help put over any movement that the student body may advocate. We believe in the old adage, “In unity is strength,” and we see that is proven even by the membership of this organization. Y.W.C.A. The Y.W.C.A. meeting was held in the parlor of the girls’ dormitory Wednesday evening, February 18, 1925. The following program was given: Song All Prayer Mary Tom Johnson Music Velma Murphy Poem Mildred McDearman After some business was taken up the benediction was led by Clara Bilbrey. The moving picture machine is now in operation. “The Old Homestead” was shown Friday, February 13th, in the auditorium, which was almost filled with the students and patrons of the school. Every one seemed to enjoy the picture together with the music furnished by the Joyland Six. A beautiful service was given on Sunday afternoon to commemorate Washington’s birthday. Patriotic songs were sung. Martial music was given by Miss Velma Murphy. “The American Flag” by Mary Frances McDearman, and Mr. Willis gave an inspiring talk on hero worship. TOURNAMENT PROVES A HOWLING SUCCESS Every Game Cleanly Played. Gladeville Wins Banner Games Well Attended The annual Upper Cumberland Valley Basketball Tournament, which was held by the T.P.I. A.A. Feb. 19, 20, 21, was in every phase a howling success. The sealing capacity of the local gym was far from ample to accommodate the enormous crowds who wished to see the games, and in consequence many had to stay outside. The conduct of all persons concerned is to be commended, as not a single disturbance or hindrance arose throughout the entire period either on, or off the playing floor. Not once was a decision of any official questioned, by player or coach. The first play period started at 2:30 p.m. Thursday, and the last was held at 2:00 p.m., Saturday. On Friday at 11:30, representatives of the various teams met and perfected the organization of the Upper Cumberland Valley Athletic Association, and drew up a set of resolutions to express their appreciation of the courtesies shown them and their teams by T.P.I. and Cookeville at large. The tournament was won by Gladeville High, with Algood High as the runner-up. The Gladeville team is coached by William Beasley, a former resident of this city. The players of the winning team forwards; Dobson, center; R. Evans and Drennans, guards. The Algood team is coached by Silas Anderson, a former student and athlete at T.P.I., and his players were: Phy (c), Freeman and Williford, forwards; Bilyeu and McCormick, center; Deck, Matheny and Swallows, guards. It can be said from a neutral standpoint that the best team won, as the winners were forced to play the four best teams in the entire tournament. The winners went through the entire four games without a substitution, and this is certainly no trifle, for not often does a team play even two games without having men disqualified by personal fouls. Perhaps the two fastest games of the tournament were played between Alpine and Gladeville, and Algood and Gladeville, the latter necessitating an extra period to decide the play. Farmer of Gladeville was the scoring ace of the tournament, having 62 points to his credit in four games. Freeman was next with 25 in four games, while Judd got 23 in three games. The all tournament teams, as selected by the referee were: () First Pos Second Player Team Player Team Farmer Gladev F Poston, Livstn Judd, Baxter F Freeman, Algood C. Vaughn Alpine C L Acuff, Spr. H. Evans, Glade G R. Vaughn Al. Mitchell, Mont. G R. Evans, Glade Team Committed Free Shoes Missed Free Shots Field Goals Points Games Spencer 2 42 17 8 21 24 T.P.I. Preps 1 15 4 7 9 11 Gladeville 4 97 40 17 23 17 Livingston 1 23 11 1 7 9 Alpine 2 59 25 9 11 14 Sparta 1 10 5 0 8 10 Monterey 3 59 22 15 22 20 Celina 1 15 5 5 3 10 Shop Springs 1 19 6 7 2 9 Algood 4 87 40 7 28 24 Baxter 2 49 19 11 13 15 Gainesboro 1 17 8 1 3 13 Central High 1 12 5 2 2 0 The highest score made by any team in a single game was by Alpine, 42. The lowest score in any single game, Monterey, 9. Most field goals in single game, Alpine, 18. Least number field goals in single game, Monterey, 3. Most free shots in one game, Baxter, 8. Most fouls committeed in single game, Celina, 13. Least number fouls committed in single game Central High, 0. Most points by single man, Farmer, 64. Most field goals by one man, Farmer, 29. Most fouls by one man, Farmer, 29. Most fouls by one man, Farmer, 10. The officials of the tournament were: Smith, referee; Blount, timer; Johnston, scorer; McDearman, announcer. Poet’s Corner Backward, tutu backward O time in thy flight, May I see her again, as I saw her one night; Heavenly blue eyes, they spoke with a smile. Give her to me, please, just for a while; Charmed by her smiles and fairness of face. The idol of my dreams, she’s queen of the race. --Alex Shipley TO A BLONDE O little blonde of airy grace, Your winning smile won’t go to waste; Your gray blue eyes of limpid light. They shine as twinkling stars at night. The lashes veiling pools of light Are like the darkening shades of night, O fairy blonde of lovers dreams. Your angel face like sunshine beams. Appeal, you have with unknown power; Attentions on you all do shower. Don’t tear his castle down today. You have him hooked, so let him play. --Alex Shipley TO A FLAPPER Blessings on thy little head, Flapper girl with lips of red. I would not call the lost and wild Independent, modern child Thou hast downed convention’s rules Some have called thee reckless fool But I praised thee, little sport Thou art sweet, and goo as heart Let them scorn thee, flapper girl Martyr to a narrow world. Twas ever thus that new-born clan. Be blamed and doomed by skeptic man. --Exchange INDIAN ROMANCE A frisky young buck from the Sioux An Indian maiden tried to wioux But her father, the bute. Tried to shute the galute. Said the Sioux, “I am thrioux.” But a little bit later the Sioux Took courage and said, “Oh, pioux, pioux, I’ll elope with the maid To some beautiful glade.” Harry Draper: “Bobbie, my heart itches for you.” Bobbie Vaughn: “well, why don’t you scratch?” Dangerous The lights had been turned out and all was darkness in the East Hall. From the room occupied by Tardy and Bruce there came sounds indicating that a battle royal was taking place. President Smith entered and turned his flashlight on the pair of wrestlers. Bruce: “Men have been killed for less than that.” President Smith: “Ahem; two young men are apt to be killed if this noise doesn’t stop.” Pat: “I call your daughter Sunmaid.” Mike: “Why-er-the raisin?” Pat: “She was the first my Sunkist.” Engineering Mr. Henderson: “Hendon, what signal does the instrument man give the rodman when he has taken the reading?” Hendon: “He goes up and down.” Puckett: “My brain is my fortune.” Pearl: Well, poverty is no disgrace.” Ban: “What about the capacity of Leyden jars –or do they have capacity?” Mr. Barnes: “Yes, they have capacity, just as a pint-bottle does.” “What could be more sad than a man without a county.” Mrs. Morton: “A country without a man.” Stone: “When I leave college I will not owe any one a cent.” John Barksdale: “What an awful time to leave.” Mr. Barnes in Physics class; “When will water stop running down hill?” Ban: “When it gets to the bottom.” Mr. Passons (in English class): “Name three prominent poets studied this term.” Miss Carrington (afflicted with bunion): “Dickens, Howit, Burns.” And continue to make eyes gioux, gloux.” And while in the glade they did cioux. Those tioux in their lone rendervioux He said, “I knioux not I could love such a lot.” And an owl flioux by and said “whionx?” --Exchange Dale Lee was sporting a new shirt when Blondie asked: “How many yards does it take to make a shirt like that?” Dale: “I got three shirts like this out of one yard last night.” Clifford: “Boy, doesn’t Effie look spirituelle in that gown?” Jimmie: “Well, er, I’ll admit there isn’t much of the material about her.” Mr. Passons (after winning a lawsuit: “Well, I’ve proved that you are crazy, and you are thanks to a me, a free man. My fee is $1,000.” Benton Carr; “But I’m not that crazy.” Count McKey and Ban McDearman on train. “enter robbers with guns drawn: “Hands up, everybody.” Ban: “Here, Count, I’ll pay that five I owe you.” Dean Smith (in English history): “Mr. Murphy, how did the Danes cross the English channel?” Murphy: “On horses.” James Carlen: “Give me a sentence of three words meaning ecstacy.” Ed Hudgens: “Pass in chemistry.” “Sweets for the sweet,” said Frances Huffman as she handed Miss Jarmon a sack of lemons. Great was the fall thereof when Mr. Davis fell for “B” White, in the Tech dining hall. DEGREES: ZERO Mrs. Mr. M. A. N. P. a. B. S. NOTICE We appreciate the mention given us by the Tech Oracle. We wish to announce “that” we are known as “The Joyland Six,” and not as the “Hughes Joyland Six.” JOYLAND SIX. GRADUATING CLASS OF 1919 Although a small number gruadating this year, we gain an inspiration when we hear one of its members mentioned, because of the great work each has done and continues to do. This class was composed of Ben H. Murphy, Lilian Johnston, Naomi Ensor, Elise Davis and Alva Wright. Mr. Murphy since leaving Tech has acquired an M.A. degree from Peabody and is now connected with the elementary department of Davis Lipscomb College. Miss Johnston, who taught for two years at Gordonsville, is now in Peabody. Miss Davis is teaching in Manchester. Miss Ensor, who has a B.S. from Peabody, is teaching in Kentucky. Of course, it wouldn’t be natural if some member of the class did not realize that she had a mission of helping some one else make life worth while. Miss Wright married soon after leaving Tech and is now living in one of the Northern states. VALENTINE PARTY The faculty, Palladians and Upper Cumberlands were honor quests at a valentine party given Saturday night, February 14, by the Belles Lettres and Sherwood societies. The guests upon arrival assembled in the auditorium where a mock faculty meeting was in progress. This unusual feature showed up to a good advantage the talent in the two respective societies. One of the most interesting events of the evening was the heart contest. In this Miss Mary Frances McDearman received the prize for being the most popular young lady, while the booby prize was awarded Miss Lucille Lee. Partners for refreshments were found by matching hearts, a delicious ice course being servd by a bevy of Belles Lettres girls. A color scheme of red and white was very appropriately carried out. The auditorium was gorgeous in its decoration of streamers and heart. Streamers carried from windows to the center of the room hung in a heavy fringe, which resembled a huge chandelier. Eight mountains in British Columbia have been discovered and ascended by a University of Chicago professor and a New York engineer. One of the peaks, yet unnamed, ranks among the highest in the Canadian Northwest. THE UPPER CUMBERLAND LITERARY SOCIETY The Upper Cumberland Literary Society met Monday, Feb. 16, with their colleagues, the Palladians. The principle feature of the program was a debate: “Resolved, That powder and paint do more harm than good.” W.Q. Lowe and Clifford Massa represented the affirmative. Miss Mary Frances McDearman and Miss Willard Johnson represented the negative. The young ladies traced cosmetics back to ancient times, declaring that the Queen of Sheba used powder and paint excessively and she “vamped” the wisest man in the world. The young men discussed cosmetics as being injurious to health. The judges rendered their decision in favor of the negative. At the close of the program President Hudgens of the Upper Cumberlands of the Upper Cumberlands read a list of the medal and prizes to be awarded this year. He urged every member to either enter one of the contests themselves or to assist the contestants in every way possible. We believe this year will be the most successful year in the history of the Upper Cumberland society. Many of our members have entered the contests for the medals and prizes; every member has pledged his support to the contestants; and all of us are eagerly looking forward to see the full fruition of our labors and our hopes. BLACK BARTLEMY PIRATE By Elise Gregory Once upon a time, in the long ago days of real pirates with peglegs and real treasures; there lived in England a noble lord—Lord Bartlemy of London, Lord Bartlemy was a tall, handsome young man with black hair and keen black eyes. His uncle owned a large estates out from London and it was upon one of these estates that Lord Bartlemy spent much of his time. On the estate next to this lived Elaine, a beautiful maiden that Bartlemy had lovd since childhood. When he was at the estate these two spent many happy golden hours together. Elaine loved Bartlemy, too, and had given him her promise of marriage when he came into full possession of the vast estates. Now Lord Bartlemy’s uncle had deeded all his property to his nephew but when he died the legal adviser, who was Elaine’s father claimed that no deed was made and took over the property himself. To get Bartlemy out of the way he worked out a plot that put him on board a pirate ship that was bound for the South Pacific. Lord Bartlemy, dregged and gagged, began to come to himself when the ship was two days out at sea. His first vision was a dark little room with rats running about. The room had no furniture except the bed, and hardly any ventilation. The odors stifled him. While he was trying to imagine where he was, when the door opened and the queerest looking little man came in. he loosed Bartlemy and in answer to his questions Bartlemy found that he was on board the “Black Flag,” the most dreaded pirate ship that sailed the ocean. The next day Lord Bartlemy was put to work. Although he had never worked in his life he did the best that he could and soon won the respect of everyone, even the hard-hearted captain. Realizing the situation Bartlemy came to hate all mankind, even the beautiful Elaine; because he felt that she, too, had had part in the plot that had reduced him to poverty and piracy. He determined to trust no man again and to do all in his power against mankind. This attitude was very becoming to a pirate and as the weeks rolled by he began to be a real, sure enough pirate. On the fourth week at sea the “Black Flag” attacked a passing vessel and conquered it, but it had the misfortune to have its own captain severely wounded the captain called Bartlemy to his side and gave him the charts that told where to find a great treasurer on an island they were bound for. He told Bartlemy to take charge of the “Black Flag” and gave him the name of “Black Bartlemy,” captain of the famous “Black Flag.” He died a few hours afterward. The next day “Black” Bartlemy was looking through the list that had been taken from the other hip and he came across a book, “love Ballads.” He started to throw it overboard but decided to inspect it. When he opened the cover the single name “Elaine” stared at him. With most eyes and trembling hands he turned the pages and read her favorite ballads. And hour later one of the other pirates was surprised to find his captain, “Black” Bartlemy, with a parrot on each shoulder, his clothing dirty and disorderly, and actually crying over “Love Ballds.” That night he called all of them together and told them of the great treasure that was now his but that he would give it all to them if they would turn the ship back and take him back to England. They gladly consented. A month later the “Black Flag” sailed into London harbor and the Bartlemy that got got off was an entirely changed Bartlemy to the one that got on less than two months before. He inquired for Elaine and found that she was still living at the old estate. Her father had died suddenly and upon going through his papers she had found the deed that made all the property Bartlemy’s.he found that she , herself, had been searching for him to turn the property over and had been on board the ship that the “Black Flag” attacked, but had barely escaped. He hurried out to see her and what happened when they meet no one knows, but we have been told they lived happily ever after. AS WE SEE OTHERS The Trident, Milligan College, Johnson City, Tenn. We are glad to receive this exchange. Your magazine is well-balanced and interesting. Why not try a few stories? The Babbler. David Lipscomb College, Nashville, Tenn. A very “newsy” paper that shows good support from the student body. The Purple and Gold C.H.S, Clarksville, Tenn. A snappy, well edited school journal. We enjoy reading your interesting stories. Your jokes are specially clver and new. The Cardinal Ogden College, Bowling Green, Ky. Your magazine is rather small. Couldn’t you enlarge each department? A few more jokes would also help. The Echo, Hume-Fogg High School. Nashville, Tenn. You have an exceptionally good magazine which is strong in all departments. Your cover design is very striking as are your stories and locals. TH ORACLE ALPHABET Always pay your subscription. Boost your paper. Cooperate by giving news of interest. Don’t know your paper. It hurts school spirit. Energy can be used for the Oracle. Forget your worries by reading your school paper. Go to Jimmie Miller with your 50 cents (each term). Help those who are doing the work. Imagine a school without a paper. Jealousy does more harm than good. Keep up with the news of your school. Love clean jokes. Make your paper worth while. Never leave work for the other fellow. Open your eyes to good literature. Place the paper above reproach. Quarrel with no one through the paper. Remember your duty to the school. Support the school by supporting the Oracle. To help your fellow man is best. Use good sense in suggesting improvements. Very little is asked of your, so give it cheerfully. Wit and wisdom are needed by the paper. Xtra large number of subscribers wanted. Yonder is the future, take care of the present. Zeal is always useful. THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Printed by Herald Publishing Co. Entered as Second Class matter at the Cookeville Post Office. STAFF Bryce D. Stone ’26 Editor-in-Chief Eleanor Haile ’27 Asst. Ed.-in-Chief Associate Editors: Dewitt T. Puckett ’25 Wit and Humor Shelia Officer ’29 Social Amy Shipley ’28 Class Hallie Ray ’25 Faculty Hendon Johnston ’26 Athletic Thos. L. Passons English Alex Shipley Poet Edwin McKay Exchange Rose Dow Alumni Business Department: James D. Miller ’27 Business Manager Jack Morrison ’28 Assistant Lee S. Darwin Circulation Manager Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY The citizens of Cookeville are to be commended on the splendid manner in which they cooperated with those in charge of arrangements for the tournament. They aided the housing committee by inviting the students from the dormitories to their homes in order to make room for the visitors. They added materially in financing the undertaking by patronizing every game. The Polytechnic Institute is fortunate in being located in such a progress and public spirited town. How have you spent your time during the term? Of course, you have met classes and handed in a few papers and reports that were thought necessary at the time, but are you ready to meet the test? “Exams” are the crises of your college training. They should be proof of the work and evidence of its benefits to the student. Prove that you have the necessary pluck and stamina for the pinches by passing the “finals.” Tech needs a new gymnasium. One of the effects of the tournament was to emphasize this already keenly felt need. The department of physical education is recognized by modern educators as being of vital importance to the proper development of the student, yet we at Tech have less equipment for this branch of education than for any other. For the past two years we have been renting the city school gymnasium, but this is only a makeshift at best. We should have a first class gymnasium, modern and scientifically equipped. This would require quite a sum of money, which could hardly be raised in an instant, but the movement must be begun sometime, so why not now? Why should not the Alumni Association interest itself in the forwarding of the movement? STUDENTS NOTICE! Among the many qualities necessary to make a fine student body, the support given to the various school activities is a most prominent one. In looking over the record of who’s who one the subscription list of the Oracle, we find that the percentage of subscribers is very low, when compared with the size of the student body. In as much as the Oracle is now entered as second class matter at the Cookeville post office, and each issue is mailed out to day students, every subscriber is assured of receiving a copy of the paper. There will be six issues of the Oracle during the spring term, and the last will be a souvenir, sponsored by the Senior classes of the institution. This souvenir promises to be one of the best editions ever sent out from the school, as it is being planned along lines usually considered in the publication of school annuals. Each subscriber will receive a copy of this souvenir, no charge being made other than the regular term subscription. Let’s support the school paper; let’s support the Seniors who are working to make the souvenir a success. During the first week of the spring term, each student will be called upon to cooperate in this work with a paid up subscription to the Oracle at the regular rate of fifty cents per term. Don’t be a slacker. Have your fifty cents ready. JAMES D. MILLER Business Manager Oracle; HARRY DRAPER, Business Managers Souvenir. TO OUR EXCHANGES We will appreciate any criticism that might help us to make the Oracle bigger and better. We wish to see ourselves as others see us. The following exchanges have been received: The Cardinal, Ogden College, Bowling Green Ky. The Trident, Milligan College The Babbler, Davis Lipscomb College, Nashville, Tenn. The Purple and Gold, Clarksville High School, Clarksville, Tenn. The Booster, Shop Springs, Tenn. The Echo, Hume-Fogg High School. Nashville, Tenn. The Central Star, Dickson Central High, Dickson, Tenn. The Bayonet, T.M.I, Sweetwater, Tenn. RESOLUTIONS At a meeting of the coaches of the various teams represented in the Upper Cumberland Valley Basketball Tournament held in Cookeville, Tennessee, under the auspices of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, on February 19, 20, 21, 1925. The following resolutions were adopted: First: Be it resolved, that we thank President Q.M. Smith of the Tennessee. Polytechnic Institute for his interest in the high schools of this section and for making possible the holding of this tournament under the auspices of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Second: Be It Further Resolved, that we thank T.P.I. as a whole: First for the magnanimous spirit of the students of the boys’ dormitory, for giving up their rooms to the visiting teams; Second, for the excellent dining hall service: Third, for the courtesy of the entire student body of T.P.I. Third: Be it Further Resolved That we thank Coach Overall for his interest and enthusiasm in conducting this tournament and his leadership in organizing a permanent Upper Cumber and Valley Athletic Association. Fourth: Be It Further Resolved, That we thank the City School of Cookeville for the use of the gymnasium during the tournament. Fifth: Be it Further Resolved, That we thank Referee Smith and his assistants for their untiring efforts in conducting the games in a manner that gave unanimous satisfaction. Seventh: Be it Further Resolved, That we commend the conduct and good sportsmanship of all teams in the tournament. Eighth: Be it Further Resolved That we place our stamp of approval upon the permanent organization of the Upper Cumberland Valley Athletic Association, as effected during this tournament. Ninth: Be it Further Resolved,That we pledge to T.P.I. our hearty cooperation and efforts in her future growth and development. Tenth: Be It Further Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the local paper for publication, a copy to the President’s office, a copy to the visiting teams, and that a copy be read in chapel at T.P.I. Eleventh: Be It Finally Resolved, That we thank all spectators for their sportsmanlike conduct at all games. Emmett Smartt, Baxter Seminary., He.E. Scott, Spencer. DeWitt T. Puckett, T.P.I. Preps. Joel Barnes, Sparta. Moss Farmer, Alpine. J.G. Wilhite, Livingston. Wm M. Beasley, Gladeville. J.E. Walker, Monterey. G.B. Thackston, Celina. W.B. Overton, Gainesboro. Sllas Anderson, Algood. E.H. Davis, Shop Springs. Lewis Loftis, Cookeville. NOW YOU TELL ONE They were discussing ways and means of getting down off an elephant. “Well, how do you get down?” asked Bob. “You climb down, of course.” “No,” replied his friend, Tom. “Well, you grease his sides and slide down,” suggested the other. “Wrong again,” insisted Tom. “Then you take a ladder, if one is handy, and get down?” was the next suggestion. “No” “Well, you slide down his trunk.” “No, you ass; you don’t get down off an elephant. You get it off a duck.” –Exchange. A PROPHECY OF THE OFFICERS OF THE PALLADIAN, LITERARY SOCIETY On a recent trip to England I had many pleasing experiences and saw much beautiful scenery but what interested me most was a visit to an old, old house. This house was made historical by the fact that many years ago an old man, of whom the village people knew very little, lived there. All that the people knew about him was that he was very wealthy, having many carriages, a beautiful mansion, and frequent visits to the old man. The many servants kept around the house were just as mysterious as their master. The village people knew nothing more of this quaint old man except that when he died, his wealthy friends and visitors carried him away in state leaving the old house as he had left it in the hands of the servants. They never told the secret until years afterwards, when the guide called us all to him and said in low, mysterious tones, “We have now come to the secret of the old house and if you are interested enough in finding it out to pay the amount of money we ask of all the visitors that come here and wish to know the secret, I will be glad to do my best in explaining it. Of course, we were all excited when he told us this and were perfectly willing to pay the money, which was just a mere sum to be used in the upkeep of the house and grounds. The guide then led the way into a smaller hall, very dimly lighted. We followed the hall until we came to a very small door which the guide easily opened but we were greatly surprised upon entering to find ourselves facing a large door just inside the smaller one. The guide lifted the knocker and in a few minutes the door slowly opened as if by itself. We entered and to our amazement found ourselves in a medium size room dimly lighted and upon looking around dressed in gray. The guide told us to be seated and then explained to us that this was the room that was kept secret because it was in this room the former owner interpreted the future, aided by his wealthy friends. He then asked if any of us had any old friends that we were interested in enough to want to see their position in life ten years from now. At this all of us tried to answer at once, so something had to be done. The guide then said he would begin at the left and as I was near the center I made myself comfortable so I could watch the proceedings. We were all wondering what would happen next when all of a sudden one end of the room began to move (so we thought) but it was only a curtain that we had not noticed being there. We then saw before us a beautiful woman in a white robe. She said the members of our party that sat on the left whom he wished to see. But this would not be interesting to you all as you would know none of them, so I will tell what happened when my turn came. I had been thinking of some one to ask about when suddenly I thought of my dear old society, the Palladians; but of course I could not ask to see every member for the other members of the party would grow impatient, so I decided would be best to only ask to see the officers: So when the beautiful lady said it was my turn I said, “Well, I would like to see the officers of the Palladian Literary Society of 1925. The first was the president, Miss Catherine Hargis.” Then there appeared before me a room in a kindergarten, through the windows the sun was shining brightly, about fifteen little children sat in a circle around their teacher. She was telling them a story. But I hardly recognized the teacher, whom the woman told me was Catherine, for she was almost white-headed. This surprised me very much and when I asked the reason of the great change I was told that was due to so much grieving over the fact that she had heard of the marriage of James Miller to someone else, so she had settled down to her old hobby as teacher in a kindergarten. I would liked to have learned more about Catherine but lack of time prevented it. So the next vision was of Miss Bill Johnson, the vice-president. Her situation seemed to be very pleasant. At that hour she was entertaining a few of her friends at tea in her beautiful little home in Baxter. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Terry I was glad to see Bill so happy and still smiling as she had smiled so many times at Tech, even at times when she could not find Fred. The picture changed then to a scene in California. It was a music room in the University of California. At the piano sat a very modest looking young lady attired in white. At once I recognized my old friend and secretary of Palladian Literary Society, Miss Jonnie Bilbrey. I learned that her greatest wish had been fulfilled, that of graduating from the New England Conservatory of Music. She seemed very happy at her work and, although thousands of miles from home she wasn’t nearly so homesick as she was when, she first left Algood and came to stay in the dormitory at T.P.I. , and then she was allowed to make her journey of four miles to her home in Algood for every week-end. I would have gazed longer at this pleasant scene but just now it shifted and there was before me the inside of a large building in New York, and there, performing before a vast audience, was a beautiful girl attired in the latest gown from Paris. I soon recognized the treasurer of the Palladian Literary Society, Miss Lillian Pointer. She had just returned from a successful three months tour through Europe. I learned that although she had lost Clifford Massa to someone else, she was contented with singing away her cares as well as those of her audience. The next scene was that of a beautiful homestead in Mississippi. While I watched closely I saw a stately young lady emerge from the door. It did not take me long to recognize the critic of Palladian Literary Society, Miss Anna Elizabeth Bracey, known at T.P.I. as “Sis,” but known in Nashville as Mrs. Jones Maxon. Although “Sis” tried to look as dignified as er position required, she could not resist the temptation of grinning as she did at Tech, for she was to meet Jones that afternoon when the train rolled in at the station. He had just the day before brought his men to a glorious football victory. “Sis” stepped into a waiting car and was carried quickly away. So was the vision that I could have gazed upon forever, but as “Sis” completed the list of officers of Palladian Literary Society, I had to be contented because the other members of the party were growing impatient. The rest of my visit in England was exceedingly happy because I was convinced of the happiness of five of my schoolmates at old Tech and fellow members of the Palladian Literary Society. Dimple Greenwood. PATRONIZE ORACLE ADVERTISERS.  

1925 March 2

 THE TECH ORACLE THE 1924 BASKETBALL SQUAD Cart Puckett, Jobe, Blount, Poteet, Watson, Clark (Captain), Winningham, Alcorn, Coach Overall. GOLDEN EAGLES CLOSE THE SEASON ON ROAD On Wednesday, Feb. 25, the Tech basketeers encountered the Presbyterian Preachers of Clarksville and were defeated 39-21. Newton with 18 points was easily the star of the contest, having garnered 7 field goals and 4 free shots. Alexander was second with 14 points. Lineups: Tech Pos. S.P.U. Poteet F Newton (18) Blount (6) F Perrine Jobe (8) C Alexander (14) Winningham (2) G Wilson (1) Alcorn G Gardner (2) Substitutes: Tech—Clark (4) for Poteet; Poteet for Jobe; Jobe for Blount; Watson (3) for Winningham; Winningham for Jobe. S.P.U. –Davis (1) for Perrine; Lindsey for Alexander; Hall (3) for Newton. WIN FAST GAME? On Thursday night, Feb. 26, the Tech boys met and defeated Ogden College on the latter’s floor. The game was fast and clean throughout, with Tech holding the lead from start to finish. The entire Tech team played well, with () Alcorn especially guarding in excellent style. D. Smith played best for Ogden. Lineups: Tech Pos. Ogden Clark (4) F Swift Blount (8) F D. Smith (8) Jobe (7) C Brown (4) Winningham (4) G J. Smith Alcorn G Pickles (1) Substitutions: Tech – Watson (1) for Winningham. Ogden –Hartford for Brown; McGinley for Swift; Brown for McGinley. NEWS FROM THE DIAMOND Large Squad Reports for Baseball Practice On Monday, March 9, Coach Overall sounded a call for diamond toilers. About thirty stalwart young men answered the call and were given their task at showing their wares from their respective positions. From this group of huskies there should be molded a good college team. Those who aspire to twirl the horsehide are, Sidwell, LeFevre, Denny, Lee, and Puckett. The receiving will be cared for by Winningham and Hughes. First base will be guarded by Bryant and C LeFevre. Second base must go to Blount, Clark or Johnson. Watson is unopposed for shortstop, and Clark will probably be shifted to third () base. The candidates for outfield positions are, D. Puckett, L. Puckett, Shipley, Jobe, Ross, Gill and Leonard. From present indications the starting lineup will be –catcher, Winningham; first base, Bryant; second base, Blount; shortstop, Watson; third base, Clark; outfielders, Shipley, D. Puckett, L. Puckett or Jobe. With the good offensive and defensive work that this team is able to produce Tech should have its greatest year in diamond history. BASEBALL SCHEDULE Date Team Place March 27 Baxter Cookeville April 2-3 Castle Heights Lebanon April 10-11 M.T.N. Cookeville April 16 Bethel Russellville April 17-18 S.P.U. Clarksville April 20-21 S.P.U. Cookeville April 29-30 M.T.N. Murfreesboro May 1-2, Cumberland Lebanon May 5 Maryville Cookeville May 8-9 Cumberland Cookeville May 15 Livingston Livingston May 22 Open Cookeville COLLEGE TO PRESENT DRAMA “As You Like It” To Be Given By College Classes One of the most commendable actions taken by the college department of T.P.I. within recent years is the decision to present a Shakespearean play during commencement. The idea originated in the Senior class and was presented to the other college classes. The plan is also being encouraged by the members of the faculty. The present Senior class is not large enough to prevent the play, but it is hoped that in future years his class will be large enough to support this plan. We hope that it will be an annual affair. The committee which was appointed by the presidents of the three classes, after considering several plays and with the advice of the faculty, presented the play “As You Like It” as one of the best fitted for presentation this year. The action of the committee was approved by a vote of the body. Further plans are being made and work will begin on the play immediately. TENNIS CLUB The students interested in tennis met and organized a tennis club under the direction of Miss Jobe. The following officers were elected: E. B. Hudgens, president; Wendell Johnston, secretary and treasurer. A day was set to clean off the court and there has been some new material ordered. The tennis club is planning on having a tournament at the end of school, which we hope will create a good deal of interest in this sport. We urge that every student interested in tennis become a member of the club. Y.M.C.A. NIMINEES ELECTION SOON At a recent business meeting of the Young Men’s Christian Association nominations for the next year’s leaders of the association were made as follows: For president –C.W. Davis, Lee S. Darwin, Harry Chitwood For Secretary –Robert Rose, Paul Tidwell. The election will be held at the next regular meeting of the organization. A request for assistance in raising funds for the donation of emblems to varsity players on Tech’s athletic teams was brought before the meeting by the president of the Tech letter club. This movement was approved by a vote of the association members and plans were made to donate the net proceeds of the next picture shown by the “Y” to the T club. LOSE IN EXTRA PERIOD On Friday night, Feb. 27, Tech was defeated by Bethel College on the latter’s floor by a score of 23-20. Tech held the lead almost the entire regular period, but were tied at 20-20 in the last seconds, and were defeated in the extra playing period. Lineups: Tech Pos. Bethel Clark (2) F. Taylor (7) Blount (6) F Higgins (2) Jobe (3) C Newman (4) Watson G Barnes (4) Alcorn G Wallace (1) Substitutions: Tech –Poteet (2) for Clark; Winningham (7) for Watson. Bethel –Reynolds (5) for Taylor. BELLES LETTRES The Belles Lettres Literary Society held its regular business meeting March 2. The following officers were elected: President – Myrtle Bullock. Vice-president –Mary Tom Johnson. Secretary –Gladys Bohannon Chaplain –Anna Roberts Sergeant-at-Arms –Treva Cooper. Critic –Daisy Leonard. Reporter –Clyde Jackson. Program Committee –Flora Montgomery, Ruth Quarles, Arnie Parham. After the business we adjourned to meet again after the holidays. The Belles Lettres Literary Society met March 16th, and the following program was given: Song –“Wearing of the Green,” Society “Origin of St. Patrick’s Day,” Gladys Bohannon. Reading, Alberta Cassety. Irish Jokes, Lucile Lee. Irish Stunts, Jewel Lee, Bulah Milligan. We were delighted to have a new member added to our society. We were also glad to have a number back. Though they entered too late to take part in some of the contests, the cooperation which they will give the contestants will help determine whether the Eagle will hold in the Rose and Gray or the Black and gold in 1926. PALLADIAN LITERARY SOCIETY The Palladian Literary Society held its first meeting for the spring term Monday, March 16. The following new officers were elected: President –Rose Dow. Vice-President –Mildred mcDearman. Secretary –Jonny Bilbrey. Treasurer –Willard Johnson. Critic –Gorda Carrington. The officers who had served during the winter term are to be commended for their good work and the president, Miss Catherine. Hargis, especially, is to be praised for her earnest efforts and for her excellent leadership. One new member, Miss Elizabeth foster, was taken into the society and several old members who have just entered school were present. As it is just a short time until the close of school and until time for the reading contests, debates, etc., the society as a whole and each member are determined to do all they can to come out victorious and thus hold the banner that was won last year. SHERWOODS ELECT OFFICERS The Sherwood Literary Society met in its regular meeting room on Monday afternoon, March 16, for the purpose of electing officers for the spring term, president Cantrell presided, and the following officers were elected: President –C.B. Johnson. Vice-President –Turner Evans. Secretary –J.P. Buck. Treasurer –Alva Starnes. Chaplain –C.W. Davis Critic –Herman Langford. Attorney-General –Lester King. Sergeant-at-Arms –Houston Haile The Sherwoods have just finished an excellent term’s work, and are concentrating their efforts to win in the inter-society contests during the spring term. GRRRRRR! The great Missouri halfback was a special guest of honor at the enemy training table before the big game. “How would you like your meat, sir?” queried the waiter of one of the enemy. “Raw,” rumbled the giant guard. “And you sir?” asked the waiter of another of the enemy. “Red, raw meat,” bellowed the huge tackle. “How about you sir?” said the waiter to the man on our hero’s left. “Bloody, red, raw meat,” roared the third and scowled at the guest of honor. There was silence as the waiter put the question to the great Missouri “back.” “Aw, hell,” he thundered, “drive in your cow and I’ll cut of my own slice.” –Missouri Outlaw. “A desire for knowledge is the natural feeling of mankind; and every human being whose mind is not debauched, will be willing to give all that he has to get knowledge.” –Johnson. Beware how you criticize. If you are the tallest person in the crowd, do not scold others before they cannot see all that you see. THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Printed by Herald Publishing Co. Entered as Second Class matter at the Cookeville Post Office. STAFF: Bryce D. Stone ’26 Editor-in-Chief Shelia Officer ’29 Social Amy Shipley ’28 Class Hallie Ray ’25 Faculty Hendon Johnston ’26 Athlete Thos. L. Passons English Alex Shipley Poet Edwin McKay Exchange Rose Dow Alumni Business Department: James D. Miller ’27 Business Manager Jack Morrison ’26 Assistant Lee S. Darwin Circulation Manager Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY Into your life and mine there must come periods of darkness. We must face business and personal reverses. We must struggle through the miasma of misunderstanding and doubt. We must cross swords with the hundred and one petty evils that beset our ways and would pull us back. And yet –and yet “there is no failure except in no longer trying. There is no defeat except from within – no really insurmountable barrier save our own inherent weakness of purpose.” Keep on! --Exchange BRITISHERS COMMENT Before their recent departure for Hawaii, the Oxford debate Team was asked by the Stanford University Daily Palo Alto for their opinion of the American college life. Concerning fraternities the three Englishmen voiced unanimous disapproval. J.D. Woodruff, leader of the Oxford team, echoed the opinion of William Robson, of the London School of Economics, whose much discussed article on American colleges appeared in The New Student, December 20. “The college fraternities seem to exist to force their members into a mould,” said Woodruff. “The pressure on the individual is tremendous. Every tangent and every angle that would make him stand out as an individual is removed. One fraternity man told me that they took in only the boys who gave promise of doing something big. That, to me, seems appalling. It implies a scramble for a certain sort of success that crowds out some of the finest value of the living.” Contrasting the American plan of university with the English, Mr. Woodruff said: “There is a genial tolerance at Oxford for students who would rather talk than work. American colleges over over-organized and students are too earnest for high scholarship. It is a great mistake to do everything too well. There are many things that, although they are worth doing, are not worth doing well. “Few persons have a taste for scholarship, which is of no more importance in itself than a taste for doughnuts or cabbage. It is a mistake for a college to try to force education on a student.” Malcolm McDonald, the third member of the team, found more to his liking in American universities than either of the other visitors. He said he sympathized with the earnestness of American college men. –The New Student HOW TO HANDLE A WOMAN ELECTRICALLY When a woman is bored –Exciter. If she gets to excited –Controller. If she won’t come when you want her –Coaxer. If she is willing to come half way –Meter. If she is willing to come all the way – Receiver. If she is an angel –Transformer. If she is a devil –Converter. If she tries to cross you –Detecter. If she proves that your fears are wrong –Compensator. If your fears are right –Arrester. If she goes to pieces –Coherer. If she goes up in the air –condenser. If she is hungry –Feeder. If she is a nice girl –Shocker. If you have one just like her –Alternator. If she is too faster –Reducer. If she fumes and sputters –Insulator. If she becomes upset –Reverser. And when you get tired of her –Electrocute her. –Exchange. HINTS FOR HOUSEWIVES The big toe makes an excellent stopper for the bathtub. Holeproof hosiery, when properly worn, makes an excellent container for hubby’s pay envelope. If the gas goes off, don’t curse the gas company. Put another quarter in the meter. Don’t throw coffee grounds out. Dry them in the oven and give them to friend husband as grapenuts. –Exchange. NEW AND OLD FRIENDS The Babbler, David Lipscomb College, Nashville, Tenn. The Central Star, Dickson High School, Dickson, Tenn. The Cardinal, Ogden College, Bowling Green, Ky. The Trident, Milligan College, Johnson City, Tenn. The Normalite, M.T.N., Murfreesboro, Tenn. The Bethel Collegian, Bethel College, Russellville, Ky. The Purple and Gold, C.H.S., Clarksville, Tenn. The Soulwester, S.P.U., Clarksville, Tenn. The Booster, Shop Springs, Tenn. The Bayonet, Tennessee Military Institute, Sweetwater, Tenn. The bugle Call, C.M.A., Columbia, Tenn. The Babbler –Your paper compared favorably with any college journal. Don’t you think it would look more attractice in magazine form? The Essay on Boys and Essay on girls was clever and original. The Bugle Call –A new exchange. We like your spirit. You have alive exchange editor. Ask him what he thinks of us. The Normalite –Another new friend. Your paper seems well arranged. Why not try a few more jokes and get your exchange editor busy? The Central Star—we are glad to welcome your paper. We like the neat form and clever jokes. Your debaters are certainly showing up well. The Booster –Your magazine has not so much material, but it lacks nothing in appearance and arrangement. Send us the Booster regularly. Bethel Collegian –We are waiting for your next issue. Don’t fail to remember us. Congratulations for the fine record your basketball team has made. The Purple and Gold –Your journal is always good. You must have an excellent staff. Your Dumb Dora Department is something new. Give me regards to “Miserable” Meacham and “Dejected” Bowen. A dairy maid milked the pensive goat, And, pouting paused to mutter “I wish, you brute, you’d turn to milk.” And the animal turned to butt her. --Exchange. PATRONIZE ORACLE ADVERTISERS “Aspiration sees only one side of every question; possession, many.” –Lowell. RELIGIOUS AND EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS On Wednesday evening, March 11, the Y.M.C.A. held its regular meeting. Alton Adams was the principal speaker and Herman Langford conducted the devotional Mr. Adams also gave several appropriate poetic selections in a very able manner. A variation was made in the program for March 18. Two reels of industrial films were furnished by the industrial department of the National Y.M.C.A., and gave some splendid views of the historic Mohawk valley in New York. The second reel showed some of the improvements made by medical science during the great war. ARTISTS GIVE CONCERT Mrs. Malone, soprano soloist; Mrs. Hoffman, pianist; Mr. Kenneth Rose, violinist; appeared in a concert Tuesday evening, March 10, at the City School Auditorium. These artists gave an animated, spirited performance. Such a trio is rarely assembled for participation in one work. Mrs. Malone, without doubt the best soprano in Nashville, displayed a voice of unsurpassable sweetness and warm tone. She explained briefly several of her numbers before their presentation, which added greatly to the interest of the music. She was recalled for encored between each group by her enthusiastic listeners. Mrs. Offman, an exceptionally gifted pianist, revealed her artistic capabilities in her part of the program. The audience gave evidence of sincere pleasure in the music offered by Mr. Rose, teachers of violin in Ward-Belmont. The Duo-Art was an unusual and interesting feature of the well planned program. A good sized audience took keen delight in this splendid recital. T CLUB MINSTREL The minstrel given by the T Club under the direction of Miss Jobe was well attended. This was the first entertainment of its kind given this season. The jokes were new, and the music snappy. Those having a special part in the minstrel were, Jeff Reagan, Clifford Massa, Dale Lee, Luther Puckett, Lauren O’Dell, Benton Cantrell, Jimmy Miller, Harold Blount, Gradis Winningham, Dewitt Puckett and Merrill Hughes Mr. O’Dell gave several clarinet solos which were very enjoyabl.e vocal solos and quartets added to the program. Mr. Cantrell was master of ceremonies. Miss Effie Judd was accompanist. The Joyland Six furnished a musical program before the performance. Recent chapel visitors were Mrs. W.A. Howard and Mrs. J.H. Carlen. A very enjoyable musical program was given by Mrs. Howard and Mrs. Carlen. Mrs. Howard played “Valse Brilliante” and the “Handerschiel Dance” Her short story of the latter, made it much more interesting. Mrs. Carlen sang, by request, “Thank God for a Garden,” “Memory,” and as an encore gave “Love Sends a Little Gift of Roses.” Mrs. Howard and Mrs. Carlen are always welcome visitors. They never fail to bring something worthwhile to the student body. Announcements were made regarding the concert given recently under the auspices of the Cookeville Music Club. JOKES Robert Smith (reading): “Say, W.Q., what’s the meaning of lethargy?” W.Q. (working trigonometry) “I can’t give a definition, but Alex Shipley seems to be a good example.” C.W. Davis (to S.H. Bracy) “Say, big boy, be careful whose pencil you use in touching that petrified finger.” Wheeler Allen in the library (after smoking his first cigar) “Well, b’gosh, first time I knew that Hallie ran a circulating library.” Frances H. (in Loftis’ store) “My sucker is broke.” Fred Shipley (to himself): “I wonder how she found it out.” A permanent guest “I have a new baby brother.” “Is he going to stay?” “I think so; he’s got all his things off.” Poet’s Corner COLLEGE ALGEBRA Swear your heart out, ruin your eyes. All the problems seem like lies. Bone all night; not quite alive. A “quiz” next day, just forty-five. Lose religion, then your soul; Cuss quadratics for a “Ghoul,” Hurl your book beyond your sight, Darn the stuff, I’m thru tonight. --Alex Shipley. ON THE CAMPUS On the campus comes the thrill, From the swamp is heard the trill Of the lazy frogs, quite gay; Making music all the day. From the diamond comes the crash Of horsehide meeting ash; Then a vaulter twists a knee, Clearing only eight feet-three. All C.E.’s are now at work, Khaki trousers and woolen shirt; Sight and measure all day long, In their math, they must be strong. On the courts lawn tennis reigns. Fast are volleys down the lanes; Lovers meet to watch the play, Do they see it? None can say. From East Hall there comes the tone Of a wailing Saxophone: Then a cornet drowns it all; Scenes of campus life enthrall. --Alex Shipley Keith: “C.W. Davis burnt a hole in his pants.” Jackson: “did he have insurance?” Keith: “No, this coat tail covered the loss.” Satisfaction Guaranteed “Are you sure,” questioned the old lady, “that this century plant will bloom in a hundred years?” “Positively, Madam, positively,” answered Buff, the florist. “If it doesn’t bring it back.”

1925 March 20

 Girls’ Basketball Tournament February 24, 25, 26,1927 T.P.I. vs. Castle Heights, Tuesday Night, Feb. 15 Societies prepare for debate Question: “Resolved, That Labor Unions as they exist, are on a whole beneficial to the American people.” The century-old labor question will again be brought into forensic prominence at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute this year when the representatives of the Sherwood and Upper Cumberland Literary Societies meet in the annual intersociety debate on April 8th. The question as submitted by the Sherwoods to the Upper Cumberlands on last Tuesday reads as follows: Resolved: That labor unions, as they now exist, are on the whole beneficial to the American people.” The Upper Cumberland Representatives will announce their choice of sides of the question on February 10th. The Sherwoods will be represented by Stanley Carr, of Livingston, and Leonard Crawford, of Baxter. While the Upper Cumberlands are basing their hopes for victory on Robert Smith, of Winchester, and Paul Moore of Cookeville, Route 6. A loving cup is offered the winning team by Womack Drug Co. The society winning the cup three years in succession retains it as a permanent trophy. Home Economics Club Organized The students of the Home Economics department met and organized a home Economics Club. The purpose of which is to further the development of this department at T.P.I. and affiliation with the State organization, so as to better the conditions and increase the efficiency of the work throughout the state. Regular meetings will be held under the supervision of Miss Rose and Miss Johnson. The officers elected were as follows: President: Rebecca Johnson Vice-President: Eleanor Haile Secretary: Mary Della Pointer Treasurer: Jonny Bilbrey Spring Quarter Opens Mar. 14, instead of Mar. 4 An error was made in the general catalogue of the school concerning the date of the opening of the spring quarter, which will be on March 14 and not on March 4 as printed in the catalogue. Some additional instructors will be added to the faculty and several new classes will be organized at that time. A large number of new students are expected both at the beginning of the spring quarter and the spring short term, which will be on April 26. “Be an Optimist” A Great Success On January 28th, at the City School Auditorium, the Sherwoods and Belles Lettres Literary Societies gave the Baker royalty play, “Be an Optimist.” In spite of the rainy weather, there was a large and appreciative audience present. The play is dedicated by the author to “everyone, everywhere who is considered a grouch.” The many complimentary statements received by the young people who were in the play made them feel that they had a done a splendid service in removing any tinge of grouchiness that may have existed in the minds of those present. They appreciate the many congratulations they have received on the manner in which the various parts were presented. The characters were as follows: Isaac Golditch: Leonard Crawford Beck, His Daughter: Alberta Cassety Jimmy Maynard: W.B. Murphy Mrs. Clinton: Lena Breeding Mike: Hollis Ours Ray Hudson: Harry Burrows Miss Hull: Edith Gentry Maggie: Vallie Huddleston Ethel Peabody: Hazel Swafford Spencer: Paul Tidwell Madame Goopher: Ruth Weaver Direcotrs, J.M. Hatfield and J.E. Lane; chairman of publicity and business arrangements, Lester King; costume committee, Treva Cooper, Maurine Quarles. Palladians Entertained One of the most delightful social events of the season was that participated in by the Palladian society at the home of Miss Shelia Officer. Miss Officer, assisted by Misses Rebecca Johnson, Eleanor Haile, Elise Young, and Jessie Barnes entertained the members of the Palladian society with a card party on Saturday, January 29th, from three to five o’clock. Both were progressive bridge and rook were played, with Miss Mary Francis Whitson winning the prize for highest score in bridge, and Miss Virginia Wilcox for the highest score in rook. Delicious refreshments were served at the close of the afternoon by the charming hostesses. The party was heartily enjoyed by all. Moon-light cabaret minstrel Sponsored by football letter men and directed by Mr. T.W. Kittrell. Practice begun last Monday night January 3lst, on the Moonlight Cabaret Minstrel that is being sponsored by the football letter men. This Minstrel is being given to raise money with which to give each letter man a nice sweater. If you like a dry, uninteresting play, don’t see this Minstrel; but if you have good sides that can stand lots of laughter, don't fail to be there. The Minstrel book is a 1926 edition and this guarantees a new set of jokes. We are very fortunate in securing a very able director in the person of Mr. T. W. Kittrell. Mr. Kittrell as everyone knows, has had much experience in directing plays and al— ways makes them a great success. The following characters make up the cast: Director: Mr. Kitrell Interlocutor: B.M. Carr Sam: Oyama Winningham Melancholy: Robert Smith Pete: Gradis Winningham Jolly: Sewell Brown Buck: Merrill Hughes Clarence: Stanley Carr We promise you a good time, and we believe that you will get your money’s worth. The date and the price of admission will be announced soon. Watch for them. Be present, enjoy yourself, and help a good cause. Burritt College Co-Eds defeated by Tech Girls The Burritt Highlanders went back to the hills the other night following a humiliating defeat handed them by the Eagle Co-Eds, 45 to 2 on the local gym floor. The Preps also contributed their part of the big Tech night by winning with as much ease from Celina. High School to the tune of 45 to 22. There was very little out of the ordinary about the game itself. Had the Highlanders played a little better or the Eagles played a little worse, it might have been an exciting game, but as it was, we can only say that it was one of those uninteresting runaways. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Burritt Thompson F. Northcutt A.P. Whitson F. Bell L. Whitson C. Simrell Hale G. Johnson Moore G. Drake Substitutes: Tech-Watson, Jared, M.F. Whitson, Whitaker, McCormick Burritt – Acuff Cumberland loses to Tech 28-18 Speed of Tech Co-eds make Cumberland Five Appear Slow. It was evident from the first few minutes of play that the visitors did not have a ghost of a chance, but the Co-Eds from Lebanon kept at it and gave the gallery something good to watch at different times during the struggle. They were obviously suffering from too much and too hard basketball squeezed into too few nights. The game was far different from the great runaway that the locals staged against Burritt College just a few nights before, but they had in their possession a decided margin on the score board all during the scrap. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Cumberland Thompson F. Whitlock A.P. Whitson F. Alexander L. Whitson C. Vaughn Moore G. Smartt Hale G. Stockton Substitutes: Tech-Watson. Second game McDonald F. Sedwell Moore F. Wendell Greenwood C. Davis Matheney G. Hahnan Rich G. Gates Substitutes: Tech-Robbins, Cobb. Dr. Crume Makes Talk in Chapel On Thursday morning, January 27th, Rev. Sam Edwards and Dr. T.C. Crume, who is conducting a revival at the Baptist church, were present at the chapel exercises. Dr. Crume made a splendid talk on“Making Good in Life," which was enjoyed very much by the students. We were indeed fortunate to have a man of Dr. Crume's ability to visit our school and to give us such an interesting talk. Valentine Party On Saturday evening, February 12th, the Belle Lettres and Sherwood Literary Societies will give their annual Valentine Party for the student body. Elaborate plans are being made for entertainment and each and every student is promised an evening full of pleasure. B. G. B. U. Takes Victory from Take One could travel many a mile in any direction from any given point without seeing a slower game than the one between Bowling Green Business University and Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Both teams labored under the handicap of it being a warm night, but it was, no doubt, Tech's night off. They would work the ball down the floor, through the scanty defense of the Businessmen and then miss a crip shot. The Eagles held the visitors very. Well during the first quarter but after that they simply couldn’t hit the hoops. They had all the breaks against them, too. Time and again the oval rolled around the loop, only to fall over the wrong side. Too, a number of personals were called on the locals and most of the free throws were made good by the visitors. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. B.G.B.U H. Evans F. Sledge Robbins F. Perisho Moss C. Williams Watson G. Weems Winningham G. Seale Substitutes: Tech – K. Evans (1), Jobe B.G.B.U. – Lewis, Stamper. Tech Preps Lose to Livigston The Livingston Academy basketball team defeated the Tech Preps 22 to 18, in the former gym, about a week ago. The Preps played ruggedly due to the lack of intensive practice. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Livingston Vaughn F. Stonecipher McDonald F. Speck Moore C. H.Hinds Matheney G. Bone Rich G. D. Hinds Substitutes: Tech – Cobbs, Robbins Prep Girls Trim Carthage Displaying the same team work that has featured their play all season, the Prep girls continued their winning pace by defeating Carthage High, 47 to 7. The Preps took the lead at the beginning of the game and were never checked. Good passing and excellent teamwork featured the victory for the locals. Thompson, Jared and A. P. Whitson almost shared equal on the offensive plays. Carthage fought hard during the entire game but went unrewarded. In fact the defense of the Preps was so good that they only shot at the goal three times during the first quarter. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Carthage Thompson F. Jenkins Jared F. Hughes A.P. Whitson C. Malone McCormick G. Armistead M.F. Whitson G. Webb Substitutes: Tech – Reagan, White, Starnes. Lebanon Five Beats T.P.I. Castle Heights ran roughshod over T.P.I. in their gym Saturday night, 35 to 14. The cadets took an early lead and at the end of the first half were leading 18 to 7. Burns for the winners, was the high scorer of the game. Robbins led the scoring for the Eagles. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Heights H. Evans F. J. Martin Robbins F. T. Martin Moss C. Burns Watson G. Haley Winningham G. Dawson Substitutes: Tech – Vaughn, Cobb, K. Evans Castle Heights – Wood Algood Club The Algood boys and girls true to their home town tradition, form a band of united workers who loyally and faithfully enter into every duty that devolves upon them. This group of ten have organized into a club and elected as their officers the following. President: Jasper Harp Vice-President: Mary Della Pointer Secretary: Henry Mallory Treasurer: Odell Cornwell Senior College Class The Senior College Class were in charge of Chapel exercises Friday, January 21st. The program was planned to commemorate the life of one of the South’s greatest heroes, Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson. Because of a visiting minister, Rev. B. T. Watson, only one of the numbers was given, this being a splendid talk on the “The Life and Work on Jackson” by Mr. Benton Carr. Everyone expressed their appreciation by the splendid applause. College students have access to art collections Art loan collections valued at $100,000 for use in teaching art will be sent by the Carnegie Corporation of New York to 20 colleges in the United States and Canada. The collections consist of 1,800 reproductions in photograph and color facsimiles of the greatest works in architecture, sculpture, and painting; 50 original prints representing different processes and schools from the sixteenth century to the present; a set of textiles in 35 pieces illustrating materials and designs of different races and ages; and 200 books, many of which are rare volumes in French and German, as well as English, on the art of every period and people. Cabinets have been provided for the sets and a catalouge prepared giving a description of each piece in the collection. Seventeen colleges in the United States, representing 13 different States and 3 colleges in Canada, are the beneficiaries. All of them are smaller colleges without heavy endowments and located in places not easily accessible to metropolitan centers. Cooperative plan involves half-year alternations One semester each year for three years is spent in an industry as nearly allied as possible to their chosen line of work by students in the department of engineering at the College of the Pacific, Stockton, Calif. During the fifth year students remain continuously in college. This is said to be the only college west of the Mississippi following the co-operative plan of instruction, under which students are enabled, after the freshman year, to gain valuable first-hand experience in the work they expect to follow as a profession and at the same time to support themselves while attending college. College Friendship College friendship is a deep, quiet, enduring affection for our college association. It is affection arising from mutual esteem and good will. College friendship is essential to a successful college career, for the more friends we have in college, the more we get out of college life. It is the desire of every college student to become as popular as possible with his college friends. Popularity, being based upon friendship, depends upon the number and kind of friends we acquire. College life would be a drudgery if it were not for the friendship we establish. If knowledge was the only thing we could get at college, many students would drop out, or not even start to college that would otherwise graduate. Friendship when once established is hard to destroy. It is something you can not loose, nor can it be taken from you so long as there is mutual esteem and good will existing. A large part of our education comes through our college associates. By discussing a topic with one or more college friends we get their views, and thereby broaden our own conception. There are many ways in which we can develop friendship while in college. We can develop it by trying to appear pleasant at all times, regardless of the state of mind. Also by participating in athletics, musical clubs, dramatic clubs, college journalism, class social events, literary societies, alumni associations, and any other organization or function connected with college life. There are many religious organizations in which we may make friends, friends that are worthwhile. Friendship is one of the greatest acquirements during college life. While in college we make friends that will last throughout life. We meet the people that we will expect to help us in the time of need, and those to whom we will render aid. These are the people which we will always cherish. A student goes to college to acquire training in leadership which better enables him to render efficient service to society. Leadership is developed, principally through friendship, therefore the greater friendship is developed in an individual, the more service he is capable of rendering to society. There is nothing that will promote and increase a student’s love for his Alma Mater more than college friendship. It is not, necessarily, the college that holds a warm place in a college man's heart. It is the college friends, and sweet memories that composes the Alma Mater. There is nothing more satisfactory to an Alumnus than to relate the cherished memories of his college friends, and his Alma Mater. Many times positions are obtained through college friendship. A college graduate, when selecting some one to hold a responsible position, over which he has charge, will usually select an old college friend, because he has been tried, and he knows what his friend is capable of doing. The friendship of no one is more desirable than that of a college man, because he is to become a leader in society, a man among men, in the near future. Some of Tech’s Friends I take this means and opportunity of expressing the appreciation of the 1927 Eagle Staff to our friends who have purchased advertising space in “The Eagle.” They merit the patronage not only of our student body, but that of all friends of Tennessee Tech. Those who have reserved space to date are as follows: Williams &' Terry Bros, Jere Whitson Hardware Co, Maddux & Proffitt, Citizens Bank, Cookeville Motor Co., “33" Service Station, Murray Ball, Jewler, Womack Drug Co., Herald Publishing Co.. Gainesboro Telephone Co., Crawford Motor Co., First National Bank, Lassater & Carr, H. 8. H. West Side Drug Co., Royal Cafe, Jenkins & Darwin Bros, T. Robbins, Pressing Shop, Shanks Hotel, ]. A. Isbell, Ragland. Potter & C0., Cookeville Marble Works, Brown Shoe Shop, Apple's Place, Barnes & Clark., Ohero-Cola Bottling Co., Crawford 8: Bates Café, Sam Pendergrass Hardware Co., Coca-Cola Bottling Co, Model Laundry, T. P. I. Café, Clark Shoe Shop, Menzies Shoe Co., Baxter Seminary, Tennessee Central Railway, I. L. Loftis & Co.. The Harding Studio, Tech’s advertisers are “Tech’s, Friends.” Patronize your friends. B. M. CARR, Editor. Y.M.C.A The Y.M.C.A. met in regular meeting room Wednesday evening, January 26th, and enjoyed a most delightful program. Each man took part in the discussion with zeal. The program was as follows: School-days: Wallace Mitchell Childhood Friends: Robert Smith School-day: Wallace Mitchell College friends: Paul Moore Friends in Life: B.M. Carr There has been good attendance at the Y.M. meetings, but there are men in the “halls” who should be in the Y.M. Come next Wednesday evening and help us while we help you make the best of our time. Upper Cumberland Literary Society The Upper Cumberlands are working hard to win the Wilson Banner this year, and furthered their plans by electing Paul Moore and Robert Smith the debaters, to defend the Black and Gold, with Benton Carr and James Carlen as alternates. Both debaters are experienced debaters and the society is looking forward to a winning team. The play “Be An Optimist" given by the .Sherwood and Belles Lettres was enjoyed and appreciated by the Upper Cumberlands and we wish to congratulate the societies and more especially the cast for their splendid performance, and we hope to help further this program by presenting, with the assistance of our sister society, a play in March. Watch Oracle for announcements. Making the Assembly Hour Interesting There is one particular form of sport that seems to be especially attractive to the students in this college; it is that of cutting assembly. So pleasant is this diversion that dire threats and unpleasant publicity are called into use as a means of preventing such untoward behavior on the part of the students in general. I am wondering if in this case cure might not be better than prevention and may we not suggest that with a little forethought on the part of somebody in the planning of assembly programs they might be made so interesting that the enjoyment gained from being at assembly would overbalance that derived from being absent, thus taking from the precedent established by the school authorities. In other words, speaking in the language of the teaching profession, the work should be made so interesting that the students will want to get it instead of punishing them for not wanting to get it as it is. The student goes to assembly after two hours of intensive concentration on work requiring the greatest mental effort. Following assembly he again takes up work of the same nature for another two hours, before the time comes for any break in his work. Viewing it in this light would it not be wise to make the assembly period one more or less of a recreational nature, thus giving an opportunity for relaxation from the strain of the regular class work. Physiologists agree that inhaling fresh air is one of the best ways to refresh a tired mind or body; therefore the assembly room should be well ventilated, It should be the special duty of some one to see that this is taken care of. Singing is one of the best methods of getting this fresh air into our lungs and is a good form of exercise as well, and is also one of the best forms of relaxation. Hence would it not be a good idea to devote a greater part of the period to singing than has previously been done. There is nothing that any group enjoys more than peppy enthusiastic singing in which each one may take part. The assembly program should also be of an inspirational nature and after a few minutes of relaxation a well -planned devotional exercise would mean much to the student body; an exercise into which the one in charge had put some original thought bringing out something different from the subject-matter presented in the class room. This would mean of course that upon some one would devolve the responsibility of seeing that every assembly program was definitely provided for with a leader in charge and that leader notified in time to allow him time for special preparation, If the student does not feel that he is getting enough from the assembly programs at present to justify his attendance, he should feel some responsibility in improving them. The primary object of all clubs, societies and other organized groups on the campus should be to minister to the college life in general. What greater service could any organization render than that of presenting an assembly program that would give enjoyment and inspiration to the entire school? Let’s get busy with our special programs then, and with faculty and student body working together let’s make the assembly hour the most outstanding hour in the day. Why shouldn’t it be? It is the one hour when the entire college gets together. When this improvement has been accomplished we will no longer hear the low rumble of criticism that is now leveled against assembly by the student body in general and the monitors can throw away their little white cards and enjoy the hour with the others. – Chalk Line Agriculture Department From time to time articles will appear on subjects based on the study of Agriculture. This is the second of this series and from them we get an idea of many practical things studied in the Agricultural Department. Clean Milk and Pure Milk Milk may be clean and yet not be pure. To obtain clean milk the following precautions should be observed: First, to have a well ceiled .barn to prevent dust and other flying things from entering the milk While milking; second, to keep the barn well bedded with dry bedding; third, brush the cow and clean the udder with a damp cloth before milking; fourth, a thorough process of cleaning the vessels that are to contain the milk; fifth, to strain immediately after milking through a brass wire strainer of not more than fifty meshes to the inch and three or four thicknesses of loosely woven cotton or woolen cloth. The vessels that it is strained in should be closed well. As far as looks are concerned the above described milk would be alright for use, but it may not be pure These further precautions should be taken to make the milk pure: First, to test the cows for diseases; second, to wash the utensils with hot alkali water, and if possible expose to sunlight two or three hours; third, pasteurize to kill germs. This is done by heating to 155 degrees F. for fifteen minutes and quickly cooling to 50 degrees F. This will not develop a boiled taste. It should be of interest to the dormitory students to know that the milk supply for the lining hall comes from a source where the rules to obtain clean and pure milk are observed. Virginia Offers Extension Teaching In Citizenship Citizenship instruction, through single lectures or short courses, is announced by the University of Virginia Assistance in arranging citizenship institutes is also offered local communities or organizations by the bureau of citizenship education of the university, which will furnish information on any subject in the field of citizenship and government. A short-course meeting presents popular demand in connection with the proposed reorganization in Virginia of State and local governments, embraces a general study of city, county, and State government, and includes public health, education, public welfare, and other activities in which there is State and local co—operation. Lectures will be arranged to suit local convenience, the only expense being for travel and maintenance of the lecturer while absent from the university. Suggested Gifts for Brides Patent snore silencer and romance preserver. Dictograph for recording sleep mutterings. A self-reducer for household bills. Electric Searchlight for use in pocket larceny. Box of chalk for drawing the line. Rock crusher for biscuits. – Exchange. Letter Found by Janitor While Archie, the janitor, was cleaning the rooms at Springbrook during the holidays, he ran across a letter. It was addressed to Mr. Leonard Miller, and read as follows:“My Dearest Leonard: “I said I’d never come back, but here I am.” You know that ”I shouldn‘t mind if you find someone new.” “But I do, you know I do.” Leonard, “I'd climb the highest mountain,” if I knew I’d find you there “sitting on top of the world.” "All alone,” I’ll go where you go and do what you do, “as long as I have you." “So how come you do me like you do?" For ”I love you truly," Lew, and “I’m sorry I made you cry” “all through the night." “But what can I do after I say I’m sorry}? “Dear heart I’ll see you in my dreams,” and “Memories" of “The hours I spent with thee,” make me wonder“where my baby is tonight.” “Sweetheart,” “I wish you were jealous of me,” “as jealous as I am of you,”“Because" it makes me “Angry” to think that you may be “Cheatin’ On-Me,” “My Own” where we have “a cottage small by a waterfall,” “then I’ll be happy," and “at peace with the word.” “Honest and truly," “I love you dear,” “but if you love me I’ll never cry,” so Black-bird, By-Bye. Farewell to thee “Till we meet again.” Thy Own, “Little" Lucy. —The Broadcaster. “Why do people cheat on exams?” Because they hate to “flunk out.” That is such an illogical way of reasoning. A degree is a proof of a person’s having passed successfully certain subjects. If you receive a degree and are a hopeless ignoramus, you become a laughing stock. It is better to know nothing with no pretensions than to pretend knowledge that you do not possess. “Cheating on exams isn’t clever; it is dishonest. To steal another’s brain work is as dishonest as stealing his books. When a paper is handed in the pupil. Whose name is signed to it is swearing that the work is wholly his own. A pledge is superficial—a person who signs h 3 name has signed the best pledge he can. Giving help is as bad as receiving, if not worse. There is a double weight of dishonor on the giver—his own and that of the receiver, who could not cheat even if he wanted to without the giver. “Cheating on exams is the most cowardly of all thefts because it involves the most inordinate of all human instincts, personal pride. The cheaters want to get something for nothing. They hate to fail an exam, regardless of the fact that they have made no preparation, because they hate to make a low grade when their classmates make “A.” They are ashamed to make “F" because others will find out, but they aren’t ashamed to look over a student’s shoulder and “copy." These people can see only as far as their noses—they cannot see how momentary weakness leads to genuine dishonesty. College age is too late to cure the cheating disease. It is a mental habit that grows by leaps and bounds when endured. The Dean’s solution—to expel those who are caught cheating—is about the only course to be followed. It may not eliminate cheating, but it will help rid the school of cheaters. This measure that provides two chances .for an offender is both wise and lenient. Stressing the point may make the practice less common, and people may see the error of their ways and mend them accordingly."—The University Echo. FINALE The longest trail has somewhere its ending; The sweetest day has its twilight of gall, When the Star of our hopes into darkness descending Fades and leaves but the black and the pall. The longest river finds somewhere its ocean; The tallest peak finds somewhere the sky. The sublimes faith and a whole heart’s devotion In the ultimate crux may perish and die. The rarest of flowers has its day of decaying, When its gospel of Beauty no longer it flings To the breeze, and its wilted petals are saying: “We’re dead—but we want no angel wings!” ——Vadus Carmack Tote Fair There’s an awful lot of happiness In this old world I find, If we think well of other folks And treat ’em middlin’ kind. If we meet and everywhere, We do the best we can There's a heap of satisfaction In just “toting fair.” There’s a powerful lot of gladness In being true to men, In carryin’ out your promises Every time—and when They don’t seem to appreciate it— Why, don’t you never care, You’re more ahead than they are By just “toting fair.” There’s rules' and regulations For being happy here But honest, you don’t need them And don't you never fear— You’ll be happy and contented If you treat your neighbor square, For the best way to be happy Is to just “tote fair." ——George P. Kissberger. Formal Instruction for Deans of Women Special course for training advisers of girls and cleans of women have been established in at least 24 higher institutions in the United States, as shown by a survey conducted by the National Association of Deans of Women. Courses vary somewhat in the different institutions. In 10 institutions courses in relation to the high school only are available; in 6, courses in relation to higher educational institutions as well as to high schools are offered. In others the particular field of interest was not stated. The dean of women is the instructor in charge in nearly all the institutions, and replies from 19, indicate that credit of from one to six semester hours is granted. From 50 to 70 pupils a year receive scholarships from the Nicaraguan Government for education in foreign countries, principally in the United States. Jokes Mr. Parsons: “When was Rome built?” Flop Tallent: “At night." Mr. Passons: “Who told you that?” Flop: “You did. You said Rome wasn’t built in a day.” A bright—eyed, shabby little fellow was working his way thru a Crowded street car selling his papers. A white—haired old gentleman seemed interested in the boy, and questioned him about his way of living and his earnings. It appeared that there was a young brother to be supported. “Jimmie is lame and can’t earn much himself," said the boy. "Ah, I see," said the gentleman“That makes it hard. You could do better alone.” The shabby little figure was erect in an instant, and the denial was both prompt and indignant. “No I couldn’t," replied the boy. "Jim's someone to go home to. He’s lots of help. What would be the good of having luck if nobody Was glad? Or of getting things if there was nobody to divide with?” “Fourteenth street!" called the conductor, and as the newsboy jumped out into the gathering dusk, the old gentleman remarked to nobody in particular: “I've heard many a poorer sermon than that.” An absent-minded man was strap hanging in a tram car. He swayed to and fro and finally the conductor said to him, “Can I help you, sir?” "Yes," said the man, ”hold onto this strap while I get my fare out.” Mable Matheny: “Sometimes you appear so manly, and sometimes you are effeminate. How do you account for it?” Willis Huddleston: "I suppose it is heredity. Half of my ancestors were men, and the other half were women." Servant: “The doctor’s here, sir.” Absent-Minded Prof: “I can’t see him. Tell him I’m sick.” Clerk: “The customer asks if this shirt will shrink?” Ikey: “Does it fit him?” Clerk: “No, it’s a size too large.” Ikey: Sure, of course it shrinks.” How much did Philadelphia, Pa ? How much did Cleveland, O.? How many eggs could New Orleans, La? Whose grass did Joplin, Mo? What was it made Chicago, Ill.? Twas Washington, D. C? She would Tacoma, Wash, in spite of a Baltimore, M. D,? You call Minneapolis, Minn.? Why not Annapolis, Ann.? If you can't bet the reason why I bet Topeka, Kan? Who was it lent Nashville, Tenn, when he was nearly broke? Could Noah build a Little Rock, Ark., if-he had no Guthrie, Ok.? Would Denva, Colo. cop because Ottumwa. la., dore? For tho my Portland, Me., did love, I threw my Portland, Ore. “Is Johnny’s new dog a setter or a pointer?” “He’s neither. He’s an upsetter and a disappointment.” If we were asked what it is the most taxed thing in the world, our first guess would be – a mothers patience. “Oh, Ma, C’mere quick!” “What is it, Mary?” “Look, Johnny ate all the raisins off that sticky brown paper.” Do you discipline yourself as severely as you criticize others? Impatience causes as many failures as stupidity. An Englishman just returning to London from a visit over here, was very much impressed with our current slang phrase, “So's your old man," In telling his friends about his visit he said: ”They ’ave a very clevah saying over theya‘h jus’ now. When a man wishes to er— pun, so to speak, another friend. ’e simply says, “Your fawther is the same way. Haw, Haw! Clevah, isn’t it? Haw, Haw! A young minister, attracted by pretty Sister Grace, was dining with the family. Little Evelyn, aged 7, was talking rapidly when the minister was about to ask the blessing. So, turning to the child, he said in a tone of mild reproof, “Evelyn, I am about to ask grace.” Well, its about time," answered Evelyn. “We've been expecting you to ask her for a year and so has she.” High-School Alumni Aid worthy Students Student loan funds granted last year by the student benefit club, an activity of the Lansing (Mich) High School Alumni Association, enabled 13 girls and 8 boys to continue in school. A total of $2,250 was loaned to these 21 pupils. In the 15 years since the organization of the club 82 pupils have been aided. The principal of the fund now amounts to nearly $6,000. One per cent interest is charged until the pupil has been out of college one year, when it is expected that the loan will be repaid. Collegiate Study The Palladian's regular Monday afternoon program was made more interesting by a study of what other college’s are doing. Mary Francis ‘Whitson entertained the members with a charming selection "On Being Collegiate." ”Roommates" and the art of ”getting along” was brought out by Letha Capps. Sheila Officer gave the latest news on“Drinking and Dancing.” “Short Saying” in college life were given by Charlotte Watson. An instructive and much appreciated talk on "Being Young" was given by Muriel Gipson. Eleanor Haile concluded this snappy program by giving the very latest “Collegiate English.” Sherwood Society The Sherwood Literary Society met in the regular meeting room, January 24th, and rendered the following program: Devotional – Chaplain. Debate: Resolved, that Stonewall Jackson was a greater leader than Robert E. Lee. Affirmative, Henry Mallory; Negative, E. J. Wood. Oration –Roy Leonard. Several new men affiliated with the society. We are always glad to have new men come in and put their heart to the work and help us along. Our enrollment is increased at almost every meeting and we are continually climbing to higher things. If you are not affiliated with a society, we welcome you to ours, open heartedly. To establish 100 scholarships for rural teachers in summer schools of George Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tenn., the sum of $100,000 has been donated to the college.

1926-01-05

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1969

 Tech Oracle Tech Five Drops Game To State Teachers Jan. 6 Professors get revenge for pre-Holiday trouncing at hands of Tech Eagles. The professors, from Murfreesboro, swooped down like an Icelandic gale Friday night, January 7th and uncorked some basketball with a real, honest-to-goodness kick in it. The professors were out for revenge and got it, although the game was not a landslide by any means. The score board, at the end of the struggle, registered 31 points for the Teachers and 21 for Tech. The Teachers started the fireworks early in the fray, and hopped off to a lead in the opening minutes to continue to hold the lead at the half, 15 to 5. Early in the second half Tech rallied and by some brilliant passing and team work came within four points of the winners, only to have their chances slip out of sight when the professors rallied, and starting another scoring spree, kept out in front for the remainder of the game. Askins set the scoring pace for the Teachers but he was hard pushed for honors by Uhlian, Rose and Thompson, who were on his heels the whole game. The game was one of the best of the season, thus far, and some fancy passing and goal shooting was uncorked before the final whistle ended the game. Vaughn and Campbell tied for first place in the Tech line-up, having a half dozen points each. Williamson gave a fancy exhibition of defensive playing. The line-ups: Teachers Poe. Tech Askins (10) F H. Evans (2) Uhlian (8) F Robbins (2) Rose (7) C Vaughn (6) Thompson (6) G Williamson (2) Vickers G Carroll (1) Subs: T.P.I. –Guthrie (1); Campbell (6); Sills, Jobe, (1), Referee –Young. Chapel Notes The Sherwood Literary Society rendered a chap program Monday, December 9th. The program dealt with the life and achievements of Andrew Jackson. The following members appeared on program: Lee Leonard –Scripture reading. Milton Acuff –Life Sketch of “old Hickory.” Leonard Crawford –Oration: Andrew Jackson. Professor Rupert Smith has had charge of the devotional exercises in convocation for week ending January 13th. Thomas Jr. –Daddy, did Noah have a wife? Mr. Passons –Certainly –Joan of Arc. Don’t ask so many silly questions. Literary Societies Belles Lettres Elect Officers The members of the Belles Lettres Literary Society met January 9th and elected the following officers for the winter term: President Flora Montgomery Vice-President Elizabeth Lee Secretary Rosalind Ledbetter Treasurer Anna P. Whitson Critic Juanita Montgomery Sergeant Hazel Swafford Reporter Ruth Leonard Sherwoods Choose Generals At the regular weekly meeting of the Sherwood Literary Society Monday, January 9th, the time was given over to the election of generals for the forthcoming three-months’ fray. Able men, in every instance, were chosen. With this corps of officers the winter term should yield happy results. Let every man put his shoulder to the wheel and have with all his might. Those honors were: President: Lee Leonard Vice-President Alva Starnes Secretary Selmer Neskaug Treasurer Fred Shipley Attorney J. Martin Allen Chaplain Wallace Henry Reporter Leonard Crawford Sergeant William Gentry Historian Vadus Carmack Critic Roy Leonard A program committee was also appointed, consisting of Alva Starnes, Chairman, and Armon Clark and Willis Huddleston assistants. Upper Cumberlands Forging to Front The Upper Cumberland Literary Society is fast becoming one of the real strong organizations at Tech. There are three classes of men in the world: the young man, the middle aged man, and the old man. The young man lives in the future; the middle aged man lives and glories in the present; while the old man –who is nearing his last resting place –thinks only of the things he has been able to accomplish in the past. Some literary societies are very much like the old man who lives upon the honors and laurels that others have won in the past. We, as members of the Upper Cumberland Literary Society, are proud of the fact that we are of the first type. At our meeting, January 9th, the following interesting program was given: Invocation, Mr. Small. Debate: Resolved, that congress should authorize the establishment of a federal department of education with a secretary in the cabinet. Affirmative Negative Theo. Hammer Dick McCutcheon Elmo Willeford Donald Moore Declamation, Pat Cornwell. After this interesting program was rendered, Messrs. Saylors, Walk. And Webb were accepted as new members. Mr. Saylors and Mr. Walker both made very inspiring talks. As Mr. Webb was not present, we are expecting to hear from him later. We are glad to welcome three men into our society and extend a hearty welcome to all visitors and new students coming to Tennessee Tech. A friend in need usually wants to borrow ten bucks. Cast is Chosen “Seventeen” to Be Given Feb. 17 The Palladian and Upper Cumberland Literary Societies will present on February 18th, the famous comedy drama by Booth Tankington, “Seventeen.” This is one of the best comedies ever produced in America, and it is certain that with the talented cast that Miss Jobe has selected, the play will be a phenomenal success. Wholesale humor sparkles in every line of it, and the impersonation of some of the characters will require some clever acting. “Seventeen” will be the dramatic feature of the Winter term. Don’t miss it! Altho the complete cast has not been chosen, the remaining places will be filled at an early date. Characters chosen to date are: Sylvanus Baxter Lauren O’Dell Mrs. Baxter Margarite Hargis Mr. Baxter (?) Jane Baxter Kathleen Gipson Lola Pratt (?) May Parchen Sheila Officer Mr. Parchen Earl Suggs Genesis (?) Johnnie Watson Henry Henson Ethel Boke Virginia Wilcox Joe Bullitt Carroll Tallant Wallie Bank Dick McCuteheon Mary Brooks Pauline Hudgens George Cooper (?) Director Miss Jobe Central High Wins By 1 Point One of the most interesting basketball games of a decade was fougth out on the home court last Thursday night, January 12th, when the Central High of Nashville five ran a thrilling race with the Baby Eagles. The winning shot was in the air when the final whistle blew, giving the Central High team the victory by a score of 24-25. The Baby Eagles acquitted themselves well; in fact, it was a matter of guess-work as to how the tussle would end. Central High has one of the strongest basketball teams in the state, and the record made by the reserves in this game is one to be proud of. The game started with a rush, and kept a fast pace thruout. Both teams showed a fighting spirit and determination to win. On the Eaglet squad, Guthrie and Little tied for scoring honors, with eight points each. Little was replaced by Campbell at the end of the third quarter, and Campbell made four points. Jobe made two points and Kellie Evans made one. Referee: Scrupe Smith. A proposal is like a telephone a ring at the end of the line. Sophomores Elect Officers The Sophomore class, under the directorship of Dannie Wright Jarvis, retiring president, convened last week and elected the following officers for the winter semester. President Hazel Swafford Vice-President Willis Huddleston Sec. Treas. Joe McCoin Reporter Anna Henry Sergeant Carroll Tallant Sponsor P.C. Scott Miss Elsie Young Honors-Bride With Gift Tea A brilliant social event of Saturday was a gift tea given by Miss Elsie Young at her home on Dixie Avenue, in honor of Mrs. William M. Breeding, Jr. Receiving with Miss Young and Mrs. Breeding were their mothers, Mrs. Hayden Young and Mrs. Dave High and Miss Lena Breeding, sister of the groom. Assisting in receiving were Miss Lillian Young, Mrs. W,K. Draper, Miss Leona High, Mrs. J.N. Cox, Miss Eola Moorehead. The entire lower floor of the home was open for the occasion and was bright with decorations of potted ferns and plants. The colors scheme of green and orchid being carried out in these and shaded lights. The guests which called between 3 and 5 o’clock numbered one hundred ten. Miss Young was gowned in a new model of flesh georgette, combined with black velvet. Mrs. Breeding wore cocoa crepe with black spring hat. Mrs. Young appeared in blue flat crepe combined with flesh georgette. Mrs. High wore tan georgette. Mrs. High wore tan georgette and Miss Breeding wore blue flat crepe. A large collection of beautiful gifts received by the bride were on display. Thomas Hardy Thomas Hardy is dead –or rather his heart has ceased to beat. The real Thomas Hardy will be living when the vast majority of us youngster boobs have been transformed into oak-roots and gravel. He lived a long life and a useful life. His literary output was large and of a high degree of excellence. Who, having read it once, can ever forget “The Return of the Native”? Thomas Hardy makes you feel makes you think, makes you see. He has made the hills and valleys of his native Wessex known throughout the world, and he has created characters more alive than the people you meet and talk to every day. Thomas Hardy’s philosophy of life was not a rosy one. He knew tragedy when he saw it, and showed no inclination whatever to run from it. When the reader closes a book of his, he usually has to wipe a tear from his eye. He wrote no “and-they-lived-happily-ever-after” books. Thomas Hardy lived what the world terms a lonely life. He followed his own star, and attained it. He put himself into his books, and there he lives today, ready to welcome any and all who care to know him much. And to know him is worth much. Mr. Mencken Convinced Ithaca, New York, (by New Student Service) –“I am thoroly convincer that too many young Americans are now going to college, that their presence is greatly impending the work of the colleges. Certainly it should be possible to devise some scheme to weed out the unfit. “Thus spake Henry L. Mencken to a reporter for the Cornwell Sun, in one of several interviews recently granted to college papers. Mr. Menckens, we are told, is “opposed to the college for the purposes of intellectual education. With Nathan he holds that its greatest benefits are social. Of compulsory military training, the editor of Mercury said: “The military training idea seems to be absurd. I see no reason why the college student should be conscripted and not the young man outside.” And the lecture system: “The American system, it seems, is better for Americans than the Oxford system. It is obviously more in accord with the habits of mind of our people.” And of fraternities: “Regarding fraternities, I know nothing. It is commonly alleged that they foster snobbery. But I see no objection to snobbery per se; all rational men are snobs in some way or another. That the fraternities exalt fift-raters and overlook men of merit may be true, but the accusation might be leveled against any other human institution.” Mr. Mencken urges all who feel the urge to write first obtain steady employment. Until recently he suggested bootlegging, but the very strength of competition has led to advocacy of taxi driving and similar occupations. A Clean Story. “May I hold your Palmolive?” “Not on your Lifebuoy. Your head is solid Ivory.” The Tech Oracle Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Printing by Cookeville Printing Co. Entered as Second Class matter at the Cookeville Post office, Cookeville, Tenn. Staff Editor Vadus Carmack Ass’t. Editor Sheila Officer Ass’t. Editor Leonard Crawford Sports Roy Leonard Wit and Humor Wallace Mitchell Society Pauline Hudgens Alumni Agnes Greenwood Faculty Advisor F.U. Foster Business Department Business Mgr. David Terry Circulation Mgr. Alfred Gill Published Semi-Monthly Subscription, per year $1.50 Editorially Speaking The Rhodes Scholarship Riddle An eminent Englishmen by the name of Cecil Rhodes desired to spread the fruits of Oxonian culture thruout the planet, and so, before he died, established what is commonly known as the Rhodes Scholarship Fund. By the terms of Mr. Rhodes’ last will and testament, the United States, Australia, Canada and other heathenish lands are permitted to send their most promising students to Oxford University for three years, fratis. These students are selected from every state in the union by a weeding out process which is very stringent. The requirements to be met may be grouped under four headings: Scholastic, Athletic, Leadership and Character. At first glance, it would seem that no man could possibly be a prodigy in all of these subjects, but our collegiate population is large and our geniuses plentiful. There has never been a dearth of applicants; in fact, the competition is so keen that the problem of picking out the most towering genius has been extremely difficult. This speaks well indeed for the quality of American manhood. The Rhodes Scholar almost invariably has a scholastic record of a straight “A” from kindergarten thru college. He is the football hero of his quadrangle; he has at all times exhibited sterling qualities of manhood, of devotion to duty, and a genuine good-fellowship. He is a good mixer, a leader in all forms of student activity. He is also religious –a moral paragon. He is the Super-Man –the last word in the evolution of the human species. Let us thank God for Mr. Rhodes and the Rhodes Scholars! However, there is a little point, of no real significance, which should be cleared up. The world is beginning to take notice of it. Even the detectives smell a mouse. Where are the Rhodes Scholars? For more than twenty years they have been pouring into the country –armed with lore and traditions of the mighty Oxford. There are now approximately six hundred all told, and the number increases each year. From this select and cultured group of well-rounded men, America is supposed to select its leadership. Yet our governors come from the hills; our senators come from the “sticks”, our presidents come from Amherst and Marion, Ohio; our writers (with the exception of Christopher Morley) come from ordinary towns with ordinary high schools, and our captains of industry come from nowhere in particular. Where in Heaven’s name are the Rhodes Scholars? Answer: They are shoveling coal! We’re Getting Rich The best New Year resolution any dad could make is to give his son a college education. A college education is worth $72,000. This is a profit of 1,200 per cent on the original investment of $6,000 which is the average cost of a four years’ course in college. Says Otto Y. Schnering, president of the Baby Ruth Candy Company: “The average annual income of a high school graduate is $2,200 and that of a college graduate, $6,000. Total earnings of the two classes of men up to the age of 60, are approximately $78,000 and $150,000. This gives the college graduate a lead of $72,000 over the high school youth.” Each day spent in the class room is worth seventy beautiful, round “smeckers.” Don’t miss a day. Dreamland (By J. Martin Alen) As you stand upon the banks of the beautiful Tennessee, and look down through its rolling waters you see the picture of heaven below; then loop up and you will see heaven have reflecting like two mirrors each in the other, its moon and planets and trembling stars. Away from its banks of rock and cliff, hemlock and laurel, pine and oak, and a vale sketches back to the distant mounsaires as beautiful and exquisite as any in Italy or Switzerland. There stand the Great Smoky Mountains among the loftiest in the United States of America, on whose summits the clouds gather of their own accord even on the brightest days. The great Spirit of the storm, after noontide, goes and takes his evening nap in his pavilion of darkness and of clouds. This great Spirit rises at midnight, refreshed from his slumbers and leaves the heavens with glooms and darkness. As the dew covers the petals of the rose on a clear June morning, he rouses the tempest, let loose the red lightning that runs along the mountaintop a thousand miles, swifter than the eagle’s flight in heaven. Then the Spirit of Storms stands up and dances like angels of light in the clouds, to the music of that grand organ of Nature whose keys seem touched by the fingers of Divinity in the halls of Eternity. They respond in notes of thunder –notes which resound through the universes. Then the darkness drifts away beyond the horizon and the moon arises from her raffron bed like a queen, puts on the robes of light, and comes forth from her palace in the sun, standing on the misty mountain tops. Night flees from before her glorious face to his bed chamber in the West. She lights the green vale and the beautiful where the true sons of Tennessee play with a smile of sunshine “Ah, fair Tennessee.” Who’s Who at T.P.I. Introducing Percy C. Scott Mathematics Q. When are where were you born? A. Oxford, Mississippi 1895 Q. Where do you receive your education? A. Mississippi State Teachers’ College; Mississippi A. and M. ; Peabody College. Q. Who is your favorite author? A. Edgar Allen Poe. Q. What book has influenced you the most? A. -----? Q. What is your advice to college freshmen? A. If you have a definite purpose in coming to college, accomplish that purpose. Unique Testament A noted but penniless man left the following will: “I hereby leave my worries to my associates, my best love to my wife, my hard constitution to my sons, my books to the public and my debts to my country.” Mr. Overall –Ferrell, what is a mouth organ? Henry Ferrell –The tongue, sir. Walker’s Used to it. He was a good minister, but the second band auto he purchased was not so good. For a week he drove it about the country by himself, and time and time again it would stop without the slightest warning. After a strenuous week with the auto, Sunday came. The choir was singing when suddenly the organ stopped. The minister evidently day-dreamingly exclaimed: “Now, what the hell’s the matter?” (He gave up the ministry). Sally (five years old) was overjoyed over the recent addition to the family, and rushed out of the house to tell the news to a passing neighbor: “Oh.” She cried, “you don’t know what we’ve got at our house today.” “What is it? The neighbor asked. “it’s a new baby brother!” “You don’t say so! Is he going to stay?” “I guess so,” Sally replied very thoughtfully, “He’s got his things off.” The Merry-go-Round Estelle Nichols (on a joy ride) –Well, what are you stopping for? David –Oh, just to find out if I have a flat tire. Roy Leonard (asleep in Mr. Lane’s class) –Mr. Lane says: what is the best way to correlate? Roy replies: Take a good nap Estel Swack –My girl is just like a woolen undershirt Donald Moore –How’s that? Estel hot! And drives you crazy! Will Cherry –I maintain that love-making is just the same as it always was. Miss Gooch –How do you know? Will –I just read about a Greek maiden who sat and listened to a lyre all night. Hammer –Suggs, would you take a chance on the present day liquor? Suggs –Sure! Where is it being raffled? Suggs –I’m twenty-one today and I can vote. Sills –No, you can’t! Suggs –Why not? Sills –There’s no election. “Have any of your children ever brought you sorrow?” asked an old friend. “No,” smiled the father, “not one of them has learned to play the saxophone.” Roy –This diamond once belonged to a millionare. Eddith –Yea. Who? Roy –Mr. Woolworth Percy Neely, (seeing Scott’s new bearskin coat), “Did you ever hunt bear?” Scott –“Of course not! I always wear clothes.” “His name is Durham.” “Is he of a good family?” “Yes, of the best stock.” The world is old, yet likes to laugh; New jokes are hard to find. A whole new editorial staff can’t tickle every mind. So if you meet some ancient joke. Step out in wonder guise: Don’t frown and call the thing a fake. Just laugh –don’t be too wise. Conductor: “Ticket, please.” Flop: “Aw, I can ride anywhere on my face.” Conductor: “It does look a little mashed.” The freshman’s idea of heaven is a place where none of the faculty will be. Keep your mind on the great and splendid thing you would like to do and you will find yourself unconsciously seizing upon the opportunities which are required for the fulfillment of your desire. All things come thru desire, and every sincere prayer is answered. –Elbert Hubbard. The world is my country. To do good is my religion –Thomas Paine. Lord, what fools these mortals be! --Shakespeare. Seventy negro women doctors are registered in the United States. Napoleon and the Duke of Wellington, who defeated him at Waterloo, were both afraid of cats. Library Notes The Tech library is reaching a point where it can rightfully be the pride of every student. New books are constantly coming in, books which are full of treasure-trove that should have an irresistible appear for every student. A well-known educator has said that the great function of a college education is to develop the reading habit –enable the student to wisely direct his course in the world of books. “Of making many books there is no end,” and to attempt to read all of them, or even to read helter skelter here and there without an objective is in either case a mistake. An even greater mistake is never to read at all recent valuable additions to the library in the way of informative books, are: “The Encyclopedia Americana,” “The American Chronicles” series, and numerous texts on history and psychology. Handbound volumes of “The Atlantic Monthly,” “Bookman,” “Independent,” “Outlook,” and “North American Review” are now to be found on the reference shelves. All of the new books are being catalogued and made available to students are quickly as possible. “Scribners” for January has an interesting article called “We Southerners,” by Grover Hall. Perhaps many people will disagree with the analysis which Hall makes of “we Southerners.” In the same issue of “Scribners” S.S. Van Dine begins a thrilling mystery tale called “The Greene Murder Case.” In “Harper’s” for January that militant critic of colleges, Bernard DeVoto, hurls a brick at professors of Education titled “Farewell to Pedagogy.” Every professor of Education and every college president who reads it will experience a rise of temper. The greatest picture of Big Bill Thompson ever painted is in the January “World’s Work.” Beverley Nichols, subject of King George, interviews the Chicago horn-tooter and comes out with a portrait so far unsurpassed. “The North American Review” for January has two provocative essays: “The Sorrows of Mencken” –a masterful but pointless piece of irony, and “The Dead Lift” (popular psychology) by Stewart Edward White. The greatest heads of the world ever knew were well-read and the best heads take the best places. –Emerson. Think more of your own progress than of the opinions of the others. Take the cash and let the credit go! --Omar Khayyam. Letterbox Knoxville, Tenn. January 5, 1928 Editor, Tech Oracle: I want to congratulate you and your staff on the splendid paper you are publishing. I have received a copy of every issue and they all deserve praise. I am a student at U.T. now and enjoy reading our paper. “The Orange and White,” but the real thrill comes when the postman leaves me an “oracle.” All former Tech students at I.T. are interested in the happenings at Tech. When we meet in the halls, on the street, up town, or any place the first question is: What do you know about T.P.I.? The “Oracle” is one of my main sources of information. I am anxious to get the returns on the last game to read the Society Notes, and all news items. I enjoy the poets corner and the essays that are sometimes included. The jokes are humorous and witty, proving that another member of the staff is doing his part to make a bigger and better “Oracle.” I am glad to know of the building program that is now under way, and that Tennessee Polytechnic is now a four year college. The school paper aids any school and I feel that the “Oracle” aids T.P.I. Come on, students and alumni? Subscribe for the “Oracle” and help Tech to grow. I noticed in the last issue that returning students are settling down to work on term papers, quizzes and so on; don’t feel conceited over it because others are in the same baot. In fact, I am up here in East Tennessee singing “ME TOO.” Very truly. Lucile Lee Class Notes The Seniors, as per usual, met in Mr. Pinkerton’s chamber on Wednesday last, and proceeded to discuss rather heatedly the necessity of supporting “The Eagle.” The annual while representative of Tech as a whole, is more than particularly a Senior production, and should be willingly patronized by all Seniors. President Crawford presided, Speeches were made by various members. The Freshmen, under the direct orship of President D. Moore, devoted the last meeting to the election of two sergeants to fill the vacancies caused by the voluntary withdrawal of two of the fall term officers. Carroll and Walker were selected. Support for the annual was also urged. The Junior Preps met with President Cornwell in charge, and elected Payton Henry and Robert Montgomery, Sergeant-at-Arms. Herman Alcorn was elected Treasurer. Sponsor Tallant made an address, and plans were made an address and plans were made for the annual Junior Prep social to be given on February 3rd. The Sophomores under the guidance of President Swafford, and the Senior Preps, under the guidance of President Rice, also convened in due order. Aggressive fighting for the right is the noblest sport the world afford. –Theodore Roosevelt Poets’ Corner Getting Out Your Paper Getting out a paper is no picnic. If we print jokes folks say we are silly. If we don’t, they say we are too serious. If we publish original matter, they say we lack variety. If we publish things from other papers, we are too lazy to write. If we are hustling news, we are not attending to our own business. If we don’t print contributions, we don’t show proper appreciation. If we do print them, the paper is filled with junk. Like as not some fellow will say we swiped this from an exchange. So we did. Culture The soft sobbing of a sensuous saxophone. The piercing treble of a dyspeptic clarinet, The drummer preys upon his cymbal; The violinist twitches his spindly neck, The pianist lingers on sonorous seventh. Music— The trombonist urges a series of squawks from his horn. The bass plays pizzicato, The cornet player goes wild on a break And a sleek-haired youth gushes to his plump mate: “Gawd, ain’t that hot, Lulu?” --U. Of Minn. Daily. Take Warning, Co-Eds. He asked if he might hold me hand, I seriously objected; Altho’ the feeling would be grand, I would not be respected He asked me for a little hug, I seriously objected; Altho’ the feeling would be smug, I would not be respected. He asked me for a little kiss, I seriously objected; Altho the feeling would be bliss I would not be respected. And now that I am old and gray, And by all men respected Altho’ the feeling not so good— I’m very much respected. –Ex. Mr foster –I take great pleasure in giving you 90 in physics. Hollis Ours –Aw, just make it 100 and enjoy yourself. Hubs and More Hubs. The world is the hub of the universe, America is the hub of the world, The United States is the hub of America. Dixie is the hub of the United States, Tennessee is the hub of Dixie, The Upper Cumberland section is the hub of Tennessee, Cookeville is the hub of the Upper Cumberland, And T.P.I. is the hub of Cookeville? What Every Member of the Faculty Should Know 1. To dismiss classes when the bell rings 2. That every human mechanism has a physiological limit. 3. That stereotypical teaching is good for the healthy students; it gives them an opportunity to make up for lost sleep 4. That mules and jackasses are narrow-minded. 5. That the best student is not always the loudest talker. 6. That is it easier to assign lessons than to learn them. 7. That a snoring class is an ominous sign. 8. That progress did not stop when King Tut died. 9. That all of the world’s wisdom is not contained in text books. 10. That intolerance is the badge of an old fogey. 11. That nothing can come out of a sack but what is in it. 12. That college students like to be treated as men and women. Mrs. Kittrell –Mr. Kittrell, have you shaved today? Mr. K. –Yes, dear. Mrs. K. –Manicured your nails and combed your hair? Mr. K. –Yes, my dear. Mrs. K. –Then you may kiss Fido. Mr. Pinkerton –Say, don’t spit on the floor! Alvin Jackson –What’s the matter –floor leak?

1928-10-17

Page 149 from The Eagle yearbook for 1996-1997.

1997

Page 147 from The Eagle yearbook for 1996-1997.

1997

Page 146 from The Eagle yearbook for 1996-1997.

1997

Page 147 from The Eagle yearbook for 1997-1998.

1998

Page 150 from The Eagle yearbook for 1997-1998.

1998

Page 146 from The Eagle yearbook for 1998-1999.

1999

Page 120 from The Eagle yearbook for 1964-1965.

1965

Page 192 from The Eagle yearbook for 1965-1966.

1966

Page 121 from The Eagle yearbook for 1964-1965.

1965

Page 128 from The Eagle yearbook for 1967-1968.

1968

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