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 Tech Oracle Truman Richardson is Elected President Athletic Association T.P.I. Athletic Officers Are Chosen for the Coming Year. At chapel Tuesday, October 4th, the officers for the athletic association were elected for the year 1927-1928. Truman Richardson was elected president, Richmond Hargis vice-president, Virgil Baker secretary-treasurer, and the gate-keepers are: David Terry and Fred Shipley, Alfredy Gill was elected Advertising manager. With this able and capable corps of officers, the Association should have a successful year. Scrubs Defeated by Carthage High After practicing only four days, Tech’s scrub team journeyed to Carthage Friday, the 13, and received a walloping of 13-0. Carthage had the advantage of six weeks’ practice and was playing her second game. Carthage scored first on their own pass, and bucked the line for the extra point. Their second touchdown was made by straight line plays. The Tech Eaglets lost a chance to score in the second half when Jobe intercepted a pass and ran 45 yards to Carthage’s 15-yard line, and Baker dropped a pass over the goal. Tallent, Matheney, and K. Evans played the best game for Tech. Line up Tallent C Davis G Huddleston G Bryant T Kerr T Breeding E Minor E Matheney QB Jobe HB Robbins HB Evans, K FB Crawford, Carlen and Brown, Cheer Leaders At the first pep meeting of the season, held Friday, Sept. 29, Judge Crawford, Skinny Carlene, and Evolution Brown were unanimously chosen to direct the vocal demonstrations of the rooters for the coming year. All three of these men are eminently fitted for this work, with their leaderships we may expect a larger volume of rooting than ever before. Shelton (a new math prodigy in school)—“If a cup is the same as a mug and that is the same as a face my girl has one of the prettiest loving cups you ever saw.” Enrollment Shows Gain Over Last Year The gypsies, the book peddlers, the tourists and the idle rich have once more come home to roost. The Tennessee Central, the bus lines, and the open road have yielded up their respective quotas, the influx having reached a total, to date, of 260. This is a gain of 50 over last year. Of course, there are many well known names among the ranks of the missing –but we must bear in mind that Tennessee Tech Supplies the Upper Cumberland section with practically all of its teachers. The majority of those who are now teaching will enroll at the beginning of the second term, or the third term, or the Spring Short Term. The total enrollment will probably reach 500 before the end of the year. New Policy Beginning with the next issue, and continuing thenceforward and thereafter, the staff of “The Tech Oracle” will make every effort possible to put out a paper written entirely by home-grown talent. Clip sheets and syndicated material will be studiously avoided, although we do expect to run an exchange column made up of the wise cracks and witty remarks gleaned from the pages of other college papers. But this column will be short and snappy. In the main, the material which goes into the make-up of “The Tech Oracle” will be the fresh and unhackneyed product of Tech intellect. In order to do this, the staff must have at least a little cooperation from the students. News alone will not fill up the paper, because local happenings of great import are rare especially at this time of the year. In lieu of news, we must have originated contributions –stories, poems, essays –from the citizens of the institution. Wake up! Uncork your ink bottle. This journal is yours. Help to make it a classical that T.P.I. and the United States of America will be proud. –Editor. Freshmen Form First The freshman class was the first to organize, being called at noon by Mr. Foster. The class met, with few exceptions, and elected Donald Moore and Lucille Cameron by acclamation as president and vice-president, respectively. Elise Draper Sherwoods and Belles Lettres Entertain The Sherwoods and Belles Lettres Literary Societies entertained the new students with a delightful social Monday evening, October 3rd. It was an informal affair at which everyone felt and acted, as though he (or she) were back at the old homestead instead of in new and unfamiliar surroundings. Many games were played and many freak contests were held. First was a general get-acquainted date making, in which the young men made three minute dates with the young ladies, for the purposes of getting acquainted. Followed an apple race, in which selected students ran a race across the gym with apples on their heads; winning: Alfred Gill. Also, there was a chicken calling contest, in which Mrs. Hatfield was proclaimed the winner, and a pig calling contest, won by Willis Huddleston. Prizes were awarded to the winners. After the contests, two capable pianists took turn about at the ivories, while the students played the old-fashioned Virginia Reel. After the program of games and contests, refreshments were served. Mr. and Mrs. Lane, and Mrs. Hatfield chaperoned. The Upper Cumberlands and Palladians will entertain the new students Friday evening, October 7th. Weather Forecast Storm: Mr. Passons. Settled: Miss Harden. Uncertain: Mr. Pinkerton. Pleasant: Miss Rose. Variable: Mr. Hatfield. Disagreeable at times: Mr. Foster. Perfectly Harmless: Mr. Kittrell. Football Schedule For ‘27 Oct. 7. Hiwassee College Cookeville Oct. 14 Cumberland Lebanon Oct. 21, Castle Height Cookeville Oct. 28. Ga. Normal Cookeville Nov. 5, Tenn. Wesleyan Cookeville Nov. 11, M.T.S.T.C. Murfreesboro Nov. 18, Cumberland Cookeville Nov. 24, U. of T. Jr. Martin Led a field for the position of secretary to the class and Elsie Young was elected treasurer. Miss Jobe was elected was elected sponsor to the Freshman class. The matter of attendance to freshman meetings was taken up and the importance of class unity discussed. Tech Eagles Down Hiwassee College Friday, Oct. 7, 12-0 Tech’s Warriors Fight to Finish in Steady Downpour of Rain The tTech Eagles in their first game of the season, and with only two weeks’ training, defeated Hiwasee College 12-0 This was Hiwasee’s third game after two months’ practice, they having defeated Union College, of Kentucky, and Emory and Henry of Virginia. A very fast game was played in the first half, with all the boys playing excellent ball. Adams, Tech’s full-back, plowed through the line for a first down, and Guthrie threw a 15-yard pass to Starnes for touchdown. They failed on a pass for point after touchdown. In the second quarter, Guthrie, the Tech flash, formerly Hume-Fogg quarter-back, ran around right for 20 ayrds, and the second touchdown. The entire first half was played in Hiwassee’s territory. The second half was played in a sea of mud and rain. R.T. Little’s punting and returning of punts was the feature of the second half. Line Up Tech Hiwassee Sills L.E. Tarwater Massey LT Wagler Suggs LG Carpenter Shelton C McBride H. Moss R.G. Hodge Kerr RE Smith A.Moss RE Honor Guthrie Q Crockett Matheney LH Shubert Starnes C RH Jones C Adams FB Wagner Subs: for Tech: Hayes, Evans, Gillam, Jobe, Williamson, Little, Tallent, Kerr, Sidwell, Breeding Additions to Library $2,000.00 Worth of Books Are Now Being Added to Shelves During the summer vacation, Mr. Passons and Miss Hallie Ray have been busy selecting and ordering new books for the library. The $2000 appropriation which was made last Spring is now being put to good use. The English Department has been allotted #300, the Education Department, $250, History and General Economics $250. About 250 books out of the 2000 appropriation have already been received and are now being catalogued by Miss Ray. Most of these books received belong to the English, History and Education departments. About 25 new books have been received for the critic department. There are now fifty three magazines on the subscription list, and about 50 volumes hand-bound magazines will be added at an early date. “Mama why is papa bald-headed?” “Because, darling grass can’t grow on a busy street.” “Why, mama?” “Because, darling, it can’t push up thru the concrete.” Who’s Who at T.P.I. Introducing Thomas L. Passons Professor of English Q. –When and where were you born? A. –Eight miles South of Sparta, near the beautiful Caney fork, and in the shadow of the Cumberlands. Q. –Where were you educated? A. –At Burritt College, Middle Tennessee Normal University of Tennessee, and Peabody College. Q. –What is your favorite school excluding T.P.O.? A. –Peabody College. Q. –Who is your favorite author? A. –Alfred Tennyson Q. –What book has influenced you most? A. –Ruskin’s “Sesame and Lilies” Q. –What is your advice to college freshmen? A. –Pull off high school decorations and go to work to show yourself worthy of entering college Next issue: Another member of the faculty Upper Cumberlands Elect Officers At the regular meeting of the Upper Cumberland Literary Society Monday, October 3rd, the following men were chosen as leaders for the Fall Term. President Virgil Baker Vice-President E. Williford Secretary Bailey Bockman Treasurer Clem A. Womack Att’y. Gen. Huffines Sgt.-at-Arms Bennett Critic Theo. Hammer Palladians Elect Officers The palladians met in their regular meeting room, Friday, September 30, at 12:30 o’clock, to elect officers for the coming year. The meeting was presided over by Mrs. Wille Mae McDowell, he retiring president. The following officers were elected: President Marguerite Hargis Vice-President Elise Gregory Secretary Maurine Robbins Treasurer Agnes Greenwood Critic Mayme Gibson Sgt.-at-Arms Hazel Thompson Sponsor Miss Elsie Jobe Reporter Elsie Young There is a destiny that makes us brother, None goes his way alone; All that we send into the lives of others Comes back into our own --Edwin Markham Patronize Oracle advertisers The Merry-go-Round Pat Murphy (feeling a little tipsy) “Say, mister, where’s the other side of the street?” Officer –“Why, across the street, of course.” Pat –“S’funny, fallen over there told me it was over here.” Flop Tallent –“Kelly, you surely must like that school girl complexion.” Kelly Evans –“Why?” Flop --“You failed to brush the powder off your coat before coming in last night.” Florence Manning –I’d like to see some majamas? Clerk –You mean pajamas, don’t Florence –No, they’re to give my you? Mother on her birthday. Some of these modern girls act as if the finger was the only part of them that is engaged. Brownie –I’m sorry I ran over your hen. Would a dollar make it right?” Farmer –“Wal, better make it two. I have a rooster that was mighty fond of that hen, and the shock might kill him too.” Brownie –“Poor boy! Here’s three; give him some corn.” Ask Me Another Whom did Captain Kidd? What made Oscar Wilde? What did Harold Belle Wright? Has Edgar A. Guest? “Is Bill Saylors dumb?” “Not much! He thinks the St. Louis Cardinals are appointed by the Pope.” Mrs Johnston –“Rebecca, are you sure that Moss loves you, and you alone?” Rebecca –“Sure, more then than at any other time.” The annual fray between the four societies is beginning now. The Wilson Banner is not awarded to the society that raises the greatest hocus-pocus at commencement; it is awarded to the society whose members do the best work throughout the year. Every day counts, and attendance counts. Which will triumph, the orange and black, or rose and gray? The Tech Oracle Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Printed by Cookeville Printing Co. Entered as Second Class matter at the Cookeville Postoffice, Cookeville, Tenn. Staff Editor Vadus Carmack Ass’t Editor Sheila Officer Ass’t. Editor Leonard Crawford Sports Roy Leonard Wit and Humor Wallace Mitchell Society Pauline Hudgens Alumni Agnes Greenwood Faculty Advisor F.U. Foster Business Department Business Mgr David Terry Circulation Mgr Alfred Gill Published Semi-Monthly Subscription, per year $1.50 Colleges Yesterday and Today When Methuselah was a little boy he did not have the blessing and opportunities of the commercialized, jazz-houndish age. No, Methuseiah lived in that remote era when “opportunity” was an uninvented word. He got up in the morning, and after a hasty bath in the nearest mudhole, went on a rampage for his breakfast. Under the first rock he found a large juicy snail. A delicious morsel but not enough for a big husky fellow like Methuselah. Rambling on, he turned over other rocks, and found crickets, grubworms, and other species of the genus orthopteran. Finally, he was lucky enough to catch a bunch of wild grapes by surprise, and ambling on to a sunny spot sprawled himself out of the ground in order to put the finishing touches to a thoroly good meal. This was the first epoch in little Methuselah’s day. After breakfast, he slept soundly and snoringly until his stomach sent out a call for more grub. Upon which he would wake up, scratch himself drowsily, and proceed to put into execution the demands of his empty innards. This time he was usually lucky enough if he chanced to be close to a stream, to snatch a minnow from the purling waters, or grab a bull-frog by the let hind foot. After lunch, Methuselah would snooze uninterruptedly until about 6 pm in the evening, whereupon his faithful stomach would immediately send in an order for more victuals,and true to the faith o fhis fathers, Methuselah would set about getting them. Now after supper the young lad hit a beeline for home. There were no poolrooms, shooting galleries, drug stores, or moving pictures theatoriums to keep him away from the family ireside, as there are today, and the plain and simple result was, Methuselah always obtained a good night’s sleep. He slept from about 6:30 am until about 6:30 am –twelve hours, all told. Perhaps this is why he lived to be the oldest man in the wordl and then (what a paradox!) died before his father. Now briefly and succinctly I hope thuselah’s schooling. He carried we have given you a picture of Me- out this program faithfully and perseveringly each and every day of his life. The years passed speedily for him, as they always do when we are usefully employed and before he could scarcely come to realize the fact, his proud father pointed to the calendar and said: “My boy, today you are one hundred and twenty-one. I am proud of you; ineffably proud am I of the record you have made in school. I don’t think you need a baccaureate surplice or a valedictory dress. I think, with your coon skin cap and your bear hide sandals, you have a wardrobe that will not serve for this graduating exercise, but which will last you as long as you care to live. And now, my son, it gives me great pleasure to present to you your diploma.” So saying, Elijah gave poor Methuselah a well-placed kick which sent him twirling through the air and which landed him twenty or thirty feet from his starting point. Methuselah picked himself up and slunk of through the bushes. His education was complete. He knew that hence force he must root for himself. Since Methuselah’s day great changes have taken place in the modes and methods of colleges instructio . These changes are readily apparent, to even a casual and nonchalant observer, and need no further elucidations. We should feel whole-heartedly thankful for the sacrifices that our thoughtful forbears have made, and offer up, in unison, a prayer for the saving of their souls. Had it not been for them, and the system they have built, we might be forced, like Methuselah, to get out and root for ourselves. Many of the student publications which come to the exchange editor’s desk are about twice as large as the city daily. Why? Because, in nearly every modern, up-to-date college student support is compulsory. Every student is required to subscribe when he registers. “The Oracle” will never be what it can be what it should be until subscribing is made compulsory. Fifty cents is a very small addition to the regular registration fees. There is only a very slight possibility of anyone leaving school to avoid paying it. Then why not put “The Tech Oracle” on an equal footing with athletics, and require every student to subscribe. Football According to evidence which is being daily demonstrated on the grid-iron, this will be the greatest football season that Tech has ever had. Coach Overall is working hard to build up a team that will withstand the toughest opposition, and the indications are that he will succeed. If the student body will supplement Coach Overall’s work with every ounce of pep that it has, there is not doubt but that Tech will make a clean sweep of it this year. Learn the yells, be there, and yell! From the Scholastic, Pittsburg, Pa: A poor wall flower Was Elsie Pannel She never swam The English Channel Schwab’s Recipe Charlie Schwab, steel king and multi-millionaire, is a man whom we all honor and adore. He is one of the shining examples of a self-made plutocrat, for he came from beginnings similar to those of Honest Abe, and climbed to the topmost pinnacle of worldly success. It is always an inspiration for us to sit at the feet of such an oracle as Charlie, and drink in his words of wisdom. It helps us to bear the brunt of failure, and to forge ahead toward a comfortable bank balance. In a recent essay on the character and accomplishments of this wonderful man, his recipe for success is offered gratis to the world. It starts off with these stirring words: “Be loyal when you start life, boys, wherever you start.” Now there is a sentence to make us shed penitent tears! We have there, in Charlie’s own words, the primary requisite for becoming a successful millionaire, and yet how few of us are following that advice. If Mr. Schwab could only come to T.P.I. and find out how many of us are disloyal, how many of us are slackers and hangers-on, what would he not say? Surely, there are very few potential millionaires in our midst –as evidenced by the prevailing disloyalty of a large part of the student body. How many of us would buy an athletic ticket if we were not forced to do so? And how many would subscribe for the Oracle without being nagged continually? How many of us attend meetings with unfailing regularity and how many pay up their dues without having to be dunned? But really and truly the most shining and durable record that can be left at your Alma Mater is the unwritten and unchronicled record of loyalty –loyalty to study, loyalty to play, loyalty to yo fellow students. It Can’t Be Done Somebody said that it couldn’t be done, But he, with a chuckle, replied. That maybe it couldn’t, but he’d be one Who wouldn’t say so till he’d tried. So he buckled right in with the trace of a grin On his face. If he worried, he hid it. He started to sing as he tackled the thing. That couldn’t be done and he did it. Somebody scoffed: “Oh you’ll never do that; At least, no one has ever done it.” But he took off his coat and he took off his hat, And the first thing he knew he’d begun it; With the lift of the chin, and a bit of agrin Without any doubting or quibitti, He started to sing as he tackled the thing That couldn’t be done and he did it There are thousands to tell you it cannot be done There are thousands to prophesy failure There are thousands to point out to you, one by one, The dangers that wait to assail you. But just buckle right in with a bit of a grin, Then take off your coat and go to it; Just start in to sing as you tackle the thing That cannot be done –and you’ll do it! --Edgar Guest. And loyalty to the purpose which put you here. Let us engrave Charlie Schwab’s recipe on our hearts, and then live up to it! Exchanges From “Side Lines,” Murfreesboro. If you have a friend who doesn’t answer your letters, you might do as a Freshman in college did –write a letter to this effect: If you are sick –sympathy. If you are engaged –congratulations. If you are married –happiness. If you are busy –pardon my interruption. If none of these, why in the O.S.X.X.Q. don’t you write? Now that Milt Gross has become so widely known, one hears some amusing stories about his new language. A man had become wealthy suddenly, and he decided that his son should know good English. He took him to a school which was exclusive and fashionable, and told the principal his troubles. The boy, he complained, had picked up his speech from the comic strips at a la Milt Gross. The principal told him to leave the boy and return in six months. The father returned, met with the principal and asked, “Well, how is my boy getting along?” “Dunk esk!” was the reply. “He’s pure wit seemple poifect.” “From the Kentucky Kernel, Lexington Ky.: “Well, I’ve sure had a good time, but I haven’t learned much,” is probably the thought of many a senior among the country’s 60 thousands candidates for degrees. It has, I believe, been often remarked that a hen is only an egg’s way of making another egg. --Samuel Butler Just like ‘Em Mother sent John and the baby into the garden to play, but it was not long before cries disturbed her. “John, what is the matter with the baby now?” she asked. I don’t know what to do with him, mother,” replied John. “He’s dug a hole and he wants to bring it into the house.” Are College Students Radical? The New Student, (New York), quotest: “Babbit –son of Babbit, he, and not the fevered convert to free trade, free speech, free thought, free love and bolshevism,” is the true American student. From The Wizard, Chapel Hill, Tenn. You can always tell a Senior, For he’s so sedately gowned; You can always tell a Junior From the way he loafs around; You can always tell a Freshie, From his timid look and such; You can always tell a Sophomore, But you cannot tell him much. I am not bound to win, but I am bound to be true; I am not bound to succeed, but I am bound to live up to what light I have. –Lincoln The Wearing of the Green Whether or not the green the Irish wear and the green the Freshmen wear are in any sense mutually related, there is a feeling of common pride to the wearers of both. Tradition is behind the Frosh as well as the Irish when it comes to wearing the green –and yet, occasionally some Freshmen gets the idea that to go about in public with the symbol of his virtue and verdure on his cranium is not an honor. How in the world does he get that way? Surely the beautiful green cap is one of the most distinctive honors of a life time. To be entitled to wear it should produce every frosh a feeling of pride and a swelling of the heart. That little green cap is proof to an incredulous world that you have weathered four years of stormy high school weathers, and have been one of the few to graduate. One of the few –yes, and one of the fewers to still enter college. Recall, for a moment your classmates of freshman high, and then count on your fingers those who now wear the green. Every doctor of philosophy and every batchelor of arts has worn it, and there’s not a one of them who does not remember that little green cap with a commingled feeling of pride and pleasure. --T.E.H. Belles Lettres and Sherwoods The Belles Lettres and Sherwoods met in the auditorium Monday, Oct. 3, and rendered a most interesting program. The meeting was presided over by the new president of the Sherwood Society, Mr. Carmack. It was decided by the two societies that a play would be given during the latter part of this term. The following were appointed as a committee for the Sherwoods to help select a play to be used: Hugh Evans, Leonard Crawford, and Wallace Mitchell. The Belles Tettres’ president, Miss Juanita Montgomery, appointed Flora Montgomery, Hazel Swafford and Lena Breeding as a committee from the Belles Lettres to meet with the Sherwoods’ committee. We hope these committees will soon be able to announce the type of play to be given. Just as the good work has begun, we believe it will continue throughout the year and in the end victory will be ours. –Reporter. Rev. Chas N. Sharp Makes Chapel Address On Monday, Oct. 3, Rev. Chas. N. Sharp, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, and Chas. P. McClanahan were chapel visitors. Mr. Sharp, after being introduced by Mr. Mac, spoke to the students and faculty on the subject “What Is Truth?” He traced briefly the history of religious toleration and the growth of scientific knowledge. He paid a fitting tribute to Pasteur, the patron saint of science, and contrasted the intolerance and bigotry of the old days with the toleration and religious freedom of present. “That man,” he said, “is nearest Truth who feels himself farthest from it.” We shall be glad to welcome Rev. Sharp back at any time. Win a Medal! Each year, as commencement draws nigh, it is customary for medals to be awarded to those students displaying unusal ability along certain lines. These medals are presented during the commencement exercises amid a general confusion of shouts and hurrahs on the part of the rival societies. It is not only a big honor to win one; it is quite a help to the literary society with which you are affliated –for every medal counts a point toward the coveted Wilson Banner. If you have a hankering for world-wide renown and wish also to do your society an invaluable service, determine now to win a medal. Following are the medals to be awarded this year, and the names of those who won them last year: Howard Scholarship Medal, Eleanor or Haile, Palladian. Essayist Medal, Thelma Music, Belles Lettres. Readers Medal, Pearle Cornwell, Palladian. Anderson’s Domestic Medal, Lucy Whitson, Belles Lettres.History Scholarship Medal, Eleanor Haile, Palladian Declaimers’ Medal, V. Carmack Sherwood. Mathematics Medal, Richmond Hargis, Upper Cumberland Oratorical Medal, B.M. Carr, Upper Cumberland. Athletic Medal, Gradis Winningham, Sherwood. History Medal, Lucy Whitson, Belles Lettres For further information, consult the catalog page 11. To be great is to be misunderstood. –Emerson. Personals Tom Gann, former student at T.P.I., is now right guard on Maryville’s football team. A.W. Smith, associate professor of history at the University of the South, and dean of Tenn. Tech, was a recent visitor on the campus. President Smith was called to Sparta and Crossville Saturday, Oct. 1, to speak at teachers’ institutes, which were held at both palces. Prof. Tallent, Scott, and Passons attended the agricultural fair at Livingston Saturday, Oct. 1. Odell Cornwell, Pearle Cornwell, Rebecca Johnston, Eleanor Haile, Cotton Johnston and Henry Carr Jenkins were recent visitors on the campus. Raphael Bilbrey, ex-student of Tech, is at U.T. this year. Charles Whitely, ex-student, was a visitor on the campus, Monday. Oct. 3d. Old students who, after prolonged absence, are back again are: Frank Sidwell, Marguerite Hargis, Fred Shipley, Uel Gill, Edgar Williams, Mabel Sidwell. Miss Myrtle Marcom, alumnus, is married. Lee Sadler Darwin and Miss Louis Draper, both of them alumni of Tech high school, were recently married. Anna Kate Scott, ex-student of Tech, is now studying diatetics at Battle Creek Sanitarium, Battle Creek, Michigan. Smithville High Has a Paper The editor of the Oracle is in receipt of the first number of the “County High School News” issued by the students of the DeKalb county high school at Smithville. This new paper will be published twice a month and is under the supervision of Superintendent Beachboard. One feature that is noticeable is the fact that no advertising matter appears in the first issue. The sheet has six pages, three columns to a page, and contains active news. We are informed, among other things, that the Smithville girls are tuning up for the basketball season, and that Coach Hembree has all of the last season’s team bu two for this year’s invasion. It is well remembered that Smithville had a hard fighting team last year, and any game they play is well worth the price of admissions –no matter what the charge. It is noted that the Dekalb county High School plays over our own T.P.I. Preps on the 22nd of this month. Their reaction against Carthage on the 14th, at Carthage should tell something of their strength. The newest thing in the way of a fruit is an apple that won’t keep the doctor away. It has a cucumber flavor.

1927 October 10

 Tournament Girls, Welcome to Tech! “It Happened in June” Presented by Upper Cumberland and Palladian Societies, March 25th The Upper Cumberland and Palladian Literary Societies will present "It Happened In June" at the city school auditorium March 25th. This play is a beautiful story abounding in mirth and action. It will be directed by Mr. Pinkerton who has had considerable experience' in directing dramatic preformances. The cast has been chosen, and is one of ability and reputation, some of which have appeared in a number of plays in Cookeville. The cast is as follows : Bettie Branson, pretty young owner of the Shady Grove Store —Samie Ruth Womack ; Susie Crundle,—Betty's best friend and nearest neighbor —Ann Elizebeth Bracey ; Nell Crundle, Susie's 11yr. old sister—Pearl Cornwall; Mollie Jessop, cook for the Bransons—Jessie Barnes; Evalina Scroggs, homeliest girl in the village —Milly White, Charles Atkins, a young visitor in Shady Grove —Eugene Collier, Randy Stewart, his friend who sells insurance —Donald Moore, Jim Pritchett, a village character with nothing to do in particular —Hendon Johnston, Jarvis Sneed, the meanest man in the country and president of the Shady Grove Bank —James Carlen. Tournament visitors you have seen us. How do you like us? Come back to Tech when you can stay longer! MEETING OF ALUMNI EXECUTIVE COUNCIL The Executive Council of the Alumni Association met on February 7th with the following members present: Bryce D. Stone, President, Hazel Wall, Secretary and Treasurer, Leonard Dunavin, Rebecca Johnston, Odell Cornwell, T. W. Kittrell. Plans were discussed for establishing two scholarships, one for boys and one for girls, to be paid out of the dues of the Association. These scholarships will probaly be awarded to students who make the highest average in the freshman year at Tech, but definite plans will be worked out later. The president and secretary (Continued on Page 6) Tournament Begins Thursday Evening, Twelve Teams are Entered. Miss Genevieve Collins, Peabody College, Will Referee. Twelve teams have entered the Girls, Tournament to be held Feb. 24th, 25th, 26th,. This is the first year that T. P. I. has held a tournament for the girls, although the boys' tournament has been an annual event for several years. This tournament is lure to be a success this year and we hope that it will continue to be held every year from now on. The following teams are entered, Pleasant Hill Academy, Alpine High School, Gainesboro, Granville, Watertown, Viola, Algood, Rickman, Red Boiling, Smithville, Cookeville City School and T. P. I. Preps. Efforts are being made to secure Miss Genevieve Collins Head of Physical Education for Women. Peabody College as referee for the tournament. Bulldogs Helpless After Licking By Eagles The Cumberland Bulldogs crawled back to their kennel, Tuesday night, dragging behind them the short end of a court which read 28 to 20. The Eagles played one of their best games, but at times they seem to be matching mits with those of their equal. Through it all the Bulldogs threatened from time to time, but after the first quarter the locals were always able to climb away to a good margin when things began to look a bit panicky. The fan who sees them all was asked Monday, "What's the matter with T. P. I." He scratched his head. Asked the same question Tuesday until about half past nine he said, "nothing at all". When the rifle -shot pass was fumbled or overthrown a week ago it went straight to the wash and was handled as clean as possible. Where a shot fell off to one side last week it slid through tie loaf in fact one shot made by Vaughn actually climbed back into the basket after over half of it was falling The game was no set- up. There was one, Roberson, in a red uniform, who offered to show something of the art of basketball. He ran the team and worked himself in and out in good style but when the Bulldogs did succeed in working the ball back to crip shot range sue of his twelve foot jumps to block the throw at the hoop." and ran up a count 7 to 3 by the end of the first quarter but when the Eagles got their hooping machine to going they came ahead in double quick time. Moss and Winningham drew the anger of the Bulldogs offense, the reason being that they were the monkey wrenches that presested in gumming up the cogs of the Lawyer’s goaling machine. Vaughn worked the floor in his usual style and made good many difficult shots. He was the high scorer of the game. Winningham the genial back guard, brought the house down when he ended one of his fast trip up the floor with a long loop without touching anything but the netting. Watson's work in intercepting enemy passes was good. The officiating of the referee Clark was the kind which makes the game a game. Line Ups Tech (28) Cumberland (20) Vaughn (10) F Frilts (3) H. Evans (3) F Martin (4) Moss (7) C Robinson (9) Rubbins G Goodman (3) Winningham (6) G Hicks Substitutes: Tech – Watson. Refree –Clark Opera to be given by Glee Club The T. P. I. Glee Clubs are working on a light opera, The Pirates of Penzance, which they are planning to give some time during the spring term. Mr. James Greer will sing the part of the pirate chief and Oyama Winningham is the pirate apprentice. Robert Smith is a major-general in the British army and Fannie Wright Jarvis is his youngest daughter. Beulah Allison, Virgie Lowery, and Elsie Young are daughters of the major-general also, and Emily Stanton takes the part of maid-of-all-works. The boys' ad girls' choruses add very much to the charm of the opera. The scene is laid on a desert island and the whole opera promises to be unusually interesting. We are glad you are here. We wish that we could keep you. Boys’ Tournament March 3rd 4th 5th, With Twenty-five Teams Entered The fourth annual Upper Cumberland Basketball Tournament for Boys will be held at the City High School Gymnamim on Mar. 3, 4, and 5. Twenty two teams have entered, thirteen of which have been here before. The list is as follows : Gainesboro, Celina, Livingston, Alpine, Baxter, Al-good, Watertown, Granville, Spencer, Smithville, Jamestown, Monterey, Cookeville Junior High School, T. P. I. preps, McMinnville, Manchester, Viola Dunlap,' Gordonville, Carthage, Crossville and Pikeville. That three teams that have won tournaments are: Granville, Gladeville, and Alpine. Many students now in T. P. I. have played on various teams during former tournament. Among them are G. Winningham, Richardson, K. Evans, H. Evans Vaughn, Greenwood, Woods, Mallory, S. Carr, Rich, Dowell, M. Gates, C. Davis, Butler, Poteet, Hargis. Basketball fans will have an opportunity to see as many games as they like during this tournament which is one of the outstanding events of the year. Co-eds Lose to Murfreesboro After holding the lead into the middle of the third quarter, the T.P.I. girls lost to middle Tennessee Teachers College 29-13. The score at end of first quarter was 6-1, T. P. I. leading. At half, the score was 9-7, T. P. I still ahead. Third quarter-19-13, Normal ahead; final score, 29-13 with Normal ahead. The score does not indicate the closeness of the game. The first half of the game was fast and interesting, but the second half was rough and the playing was ragged. Beasley was high scorer of the game, with 19 points: A. P. Whitson was next with 11 points. Lineup: Tech M.T.T.C. A.P. Whitson (11) F Beasley (19) Thompson (2) F Pitt L. Whitson C Vaughn Moore G Dillon Haile G Jones Referee Josh Hughes Substitutes, Normal: Templeton, Keeling, Ganaway. A school is prosperous in proportion to the horsepower and horse sense of its boosters. Can You Answer These Questions? Ask Biology Students about These Questions Which Are Studied in That Class The following are a few of the questions asked and discussed in the biology class. Some may appear easy and simple, but when studied scientifically have an important bearing on various subjects. 1. Do snakes have feet? 2. Do earthworms have a brain? 3. What means of communication do bees have? 4. How does an oyster eat? 5. Can a toad taste foot? 6. What are vitamins? 7. Do fish have blood? 8. What is the smallest animal in the world? 9. What is the smallest plant in the world? 10. How are leaves of plants made green? 11. What is the morphology of yeast? 12. Is there anything older than its mother? 13. What is life? 14. How is bread mould formed? 15. What is “Pond scum”? 16. Does a crawfish have a backbone? 17. Do honey bees see? 18. How many eggs does a queen bee lay per day? -The Babbler Bethel Five Wins from Tech by 39 to 17 Score Bethel College took revenge from Tenn. Tech in their home gym. Friday night Feb. 11. For the first half the teams were evenly matched. They swapped fumbles and bad passes after the rest period the Kentuckians took the floor, with renewed energy and overcome small margin that the Eagles held on them, never to be checked. The crip shots that the Kentuckians were permitted to make marked the decisive part of the game. Line Up Tech Bethel Evans F Regnold Vaughn F Higgins Winningham C Sanford Robbins G Rogers Watson G Cabrey Subs: Tech –Cobb, R. Evans, Johnson and Davis Bethel: Girh. Referee: Johnson Upper Cumberland Chooses Affirmative Side of Question for Debate The Upper Cumberland debater have chosen the affirmative side of the question submitted by the Sherwoods for the annual intersociety debate which is: Resolved, That Labor Unions as they now exist, are on the whole beneficial to the American people. Both teams are strong and will represent their societies well. College Finances Let students pay for education now suggested Let students pay for the entire cost of education. Here is a means of eliminating the necessity for perpetual begging, for the brother and danger of million dollar drives so at least thought some of the del-agates to a recent Association of American Colleges convention at Chicago. Instead of paying only 31 per cent of educational cost as they do now, college students should foot the entire educational bill, argued Trevor Arnett, authority on college finance, who represented the Carnegie Institute. He recommended that tuition fees be raised gradually to cover the entire cost of college courses. Scholarship loans and student aids of all kinds should be utilized to enable students to meet this additional charge, he said. Money now used for endowment could be diverted to these channels. Alfred College Experiments While discussion goes on, one college has lately begun to experiment with this new idea. The forthcoming catalog of Alfred University (New York) carries the announcement that tuition fees will be gradually increased to meet the cost of education. By a cooperative agreement the Harmon Founda lion premises to lend money to students unable to furnish cash. The tuition will increase gradually during the next three years, from the present amount of $150 year to $300. Eventually, Alfred University announces, this move will free education from the "stigma of eleemosynarism". Students Will Borrow Students will, of course, not be expected to pay the entire fee at once, except in rare cases only $150 or possibly $100, will be asked for in cash payment. The deferred obligation will be turned over to tuition within the next five years. In return, the Foundation will furnish the University with cash for current operating expenses. This is not the first attempt of the Harmon Foundation to lend money to students for completing their education. Since 1922 groups of students in 60 colleges have been borrowing from this source. The money loaned for a period of five years, to be repaid in installments of $10 per month. So far the plan has been quite successful; out of 357 borrowers only two have failed altogether in their payments. Students Will Lend Meanwhile something new under the sun, a system of student loans, has been established. Palaeopitus Dartmouth student government has begun the system of student loans described in the New Student of December 8. The following are the main provisions in the measure passed by Palaeopitus: 1. This fund shall be known as The Palaeopitus Student Loan Fund, the appropriation for which shall be made by Palaeopitus from the College Chest and shell be administered by the Committee hereinafter described. 2. The purpose of this fund shall be solely to furnish financial aid for any Dartmouth undergraduate who would otherwise be unable to meet his college bills in acceptance with the regulations of the college, “No student shall be perceived to register any semester take the final examination in course unless all college bills at that time are paid.” This fund shall be super by treasurer of the College man, a committee of three of the personnel department, the treasurer of Palatopitus, the Personnel officer acting Chairman of the Committee –Student Automobile Dictionary Carburetor –The place from all trouble starts. The Tech Oracle Official Publication of the students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Published Semi-monthly Subscription rates $1.50 per year Editorial Staff Editor in Chief Hazel Wall Assistant Editor Eleanor Haile Assistant Editor Benton M. Carr Associate Editors Athletic Harry Burrow Wit and Humor Robert Smith Exchange Alberta Cassetty Class Editor Lucille Lee Society Odell Cornwell Alumni Rebecca Johnston Feature Editor Jonnie Bilbrey Poet Vadus Carmack Business Manager David Terry Assistant Business Manager Circulation Manager Paul Tidwell Asst. Circulation Manager Alfred Gill Faculty Advisor J.M. Hatfield Printed by Herald Publishing Company. Entered at the Cookeville post office. Second-class rate pending. Dear Old Dad Sammie Ruth Womack We honor our mother and love her more than any other woman living, but I sometimes wonder if “dear old dad” does not grow a wee bit jealous of all the love and devotion we lavish on her? You rarely ever heard dad praised. He is the man that pays the bills –the fellow we go to when we are in need of money, and in many instances he is hardly considered a member of the family. I love my mother as much as any of you, but my father holds a place in my heart that no one can fill; and so it is of our “dear old dad” that I would speak to you today. When our fathers married and took upon themselves the responsibilities of family life, they were practically all of them young of perhaps younger than you college boys. They had the same love of life, the same enthusiasm in sports, and the same capacity of enjoyment that you boys have. Probably none of them and the advantages of a college education, but no matter from what station of life they came, they had a good time. All this they gave up for us. What have we done for them? They do not except much from us; but they do expect and we show them due respect and that we make the most of the opportunities which they have made it possible for us to have. Our fathers are human beings, and they enjoy being loved and praised as much as our mothers do. We have a mother’s day, a young peoples’ day, and recently in Nashville a week was set aside as boys’ week. But where does dad’s day come in? I know the fathers have long ago lost faith in the old adage “that every dog has his day”. Let us consider how hard they have worked and toiled for us and what we owe them in return. Some of them have worked from early morning until late at night in order that we may have better advantages than they had. They are happy in our success and they have long ceased to dream of what they might have been and they have transferred their dreams and ambitions to the lives of their children. What proud father has not pictured to himself his son as a president? And thus it is if we would make dad happy and make him feel that all his efforts have not been in vain, we must do our best in everything. Let us not think of dad as an outsider and one who can not understand things. The reason many of us have formed this opinion of our fathers is that we have not given him a chance to prove himself otherwise. We have lived under the same roof all these years, and yet understand each other as much as do the rankest of strangers. Young people, this applies to you. May I ask that you get acquainted with him and make him your partner and pal in every place of your life. He will enjoy hearing all your joys and your sorrows and will take pride in helping you. Long ago the idea was formed that the whole existence of the family depended upon the mother, but this idea has been proved false as it was formed in a time when so many fathers turned down their families for strong drink. We have ceased to say that when we lose our mothers we have lost our best best friend, but that we have lost one of the best friends, for our father is, in truth, as good a friend as our mothers. And let us not wait until t is too late to show dad we love and appreciate him but if we have any roses for him, give them to him now instead of putting them on his grave. Palladians and Upper Cumberlands Have a Valentine Program “With a steady swing and an open brow We have tramped the way together.” The Palladians and their follow workers, Upper Cumberlands, were loath to admit the passing of a festival day without some commemoration. And accordingly, when Valentine came, thinking of past work together and “The leagues that lie before us” they met together in the auditorium and left on the program books of the society a few numbers for future members to be proud: Devotional –Baily Bockman Vocal Duet –Beulah Allison and Robert Smith, accompanied by Dan Jarvis Declamation –Paul Moore The program was as concluded with a Valentine contest, and prizes were awarded O’dell Cornwell, Polly Hudgens and Beulah Allison. Death of Mr. Henderson’s sister We were very sorry to learn of the death of Mrs. A. G. Scott which occurred at her home in Jonesboro, Arkansas, on February 11 after an illness of several months. Mrs. Scott was a sister of Mr. J. M. Henderson and the mother of Allen G. Scott, who was a student of T. P. I. at the beginning of the fall quarter. He was called home on account of the illness of his mother and was unable to return. We extend our deepest sympathy to Mr. Henderson and the Scott family. Eagles lose hard fought game to businessmen The quintet of Bowling Green Business University won a hard fought game from Tennessee Tech’s five by a one point margin. The score being 30 to 29. The first half of the game was a little slow but through the entire last half it was not known whether either team had the edge on the other, as both teams were playing a rapid game. It was not until the time whistle ended the game that the spectators or team knew which would win. Vaughn was the high scorer of the game, he looped 19 of Tech 29 points. Line up T. P. I. B. G. B. U. Vaughn F Perisho Evans F Stamper Winningham C Williams Robbins G Lewis R. Evans G Weems Subs, Tech: Cobb, Johnson Referee: Smith Advertising is the life of trade and the death of failure. Music Notes The chapel hour Wednesday of last week and Thursday of this week was given to Miss Stanton, who arranged some very interesting programs. On Wednesday, the program consisted of: Piano solo: Minuet Paderewski Virginia Wilcox Vocal Solo: Where my Caravan has Rested A Garden Romance – Beulah Allison Saxophone Solos: Selection from “The Mikado” Toddling Sax –Lauren O’Dell On Thursday morning the following program was given: Reading –“Home Sweet Home” O’dell Cornwell Vocal Solos: “By the Water of Minnesota” --Cadman “Spring Fancy –Denmore --Daninie Wright Jarvis. New Books for Library The following books were added to the library last week: “Far From the Maddening Crowd” by Thomas Hardy. “The Choir Invisible” by James Lane Allen “In the Tennessee Mountains” by Charles Egbert Craddock “The Black Tulip” by Alexander Dumas. “The Marble Faun” by Natahniel Hawthorne “The Appreciation of Art” by Eugen Newhaus “Great Artists and Their Work” by Alfred Mansfield Brooks “Democracy and the Party System” by Osthogorski “Hand Andy” by Samuel Lover “Ninety-Three” by Victor Hugo “Shirely” by Charlotte Bronte Everybody Wants to Attend College “More and more students in our colleges” –year after year the Boston Transcript’s annual survey of college education has brought forth this hackedneyed statement. This year it is revised. Now, “everybody wants to go to college.” Approximately 750,000 young people are now attending colleges in the United States. Many statistics will follow, the transcript announces, of which a good percentage, it is hoped, will prove illuminating; but none will there be more indicative of current conditions in the realm of American higher education than these: Only thirteen in 10,000 of the population of France and only fifteen in 10,000 of the population of the British Ilses are found in the universities of those countries; there were in our colleges and universities during 1923 about 600,000 students, or about sixty in 10,000 of the population of this country. --New Student. Locals Several former Tech students will present at the Valentine party given Saturday evening, February 12, by the Belles Lettres and Sherwood Literary Societies. The following T. I. I. students spent the week-end away: Arlie Moss – Chattanooga Hugh Butler –Celina Milard Gates –Celina Willie Cherry–Celina A.C. Willis –Spencer Henry Chapman –Spencer Pearle Cornwall –Nashville Ann Elizabeth Bracey –Nashville Eugene Collier –Nashville Mr. and Mrs. Smith Entertain Faculty. The faculty of T. P. I and their wives were delightfully entertained at the home of Acting President A.W. Smith and Mrs. Smith on Monday evening, February 14. The Valentine idea was carried out in the decorations, amusements, and refreshments. Seven tables of progressive rook were played, Mrs. Pinkerton receiving the prize, a lovely handkerchief. For the highest score. Mr J.M. Hatfield was the winner of a contest, due to his proficiency in forestry. The faculty appreciated the counesy extended them by Mr. and Mrs. Smith, as this was the first opportunity they had had of getting together. News Items At a meeting of the State Board of Education on February 11, $400 was appropriated for the purchase of a large motor driven lawn mower for use on the campus and athletic field. Mr. Austin W. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Pinkerton, and Miss Oliver attended the Teachers Meeting at Smithville last Saturday, where Mr. Smith addressed the teachers of Dekalb Count. Miss Eunice Allen, Miss Brownie Renfore, Miss Lilah Hembree, and Mr. Z. I. Beachboard, members of the faculty of the Smithville Highschool, were here for the game between the Smithville girls and T.P.I. Prep girls. Mrs. Chas. Cooper was president at the chapel hour Wednesday morning and sang three numbers which were very much enjoyed by the student body. Prep Beats Baxter in First Game In a game marred by unusual roughness and a great number of fouls. T.P.I. preps defeated the Baxter seminary 30 to 22 one night last week in the City school gyms. The preps led through the game by a small margin, but it looked as if the Baxterians would go ahead several times. Neville for Baxter was the high scorer. He basketed 8 field goals. McDonald for the Preps. Was successful in ringing the bell five times for 2 points each and one free goal. Line Up Preps Baxter McDonald F Puckett Greenwood F Boyd Moore C Neville Cobb G Lynn Rich G Brown Subs: Preps, Robbins Baxter –Jones, Jaquess Love Love is a native of the rocks, Of briery paths and stony places: She has no bond with men who wear The placid mask of happy faces; She favors not the glittering court, Its ennui- nor its gaudy graces-.L-. Love dwells among the weathered rocks. Of the wind-swept and silent spaces. Love cohabits with the winds That swirl in elemental fury Above the earth and when she sends Her challenge to a tired heart, weary With the quiet tenor of its way, Her mandate is so softly spoken It reeks not of the price to pay, Nor counts the hearts already broken. 0, yes! Love dwells among the rocks, Her haven is the unseen places Where God meets god and stars in flocks A- cruising go through empty spaces. And she is king and she is queen To fits of despotism given And through her scepter is unseen It rules the earth as well as heaven --Vadus Carmack It is a striking coincidence that American ends in “I Can.” The Luck of Having a Job Good luck is the twin brother of hard work, while hard luck is a close relative of laziness. Luck dreams of a dollar, work earn it. Luck pictures a home, while work builds it. Luck takes a nap, while brains are winning points. Trusting to luck is fishing with an empty hook. The map who relies on luck is lucky if he keeps out of the poor house. True luck means rising at six in the morning—out on the floor before the alarm clock stops. Living on a dollar if you earn two. Minding your own business. Noticing your own faults as closely as you do your neighbor’s. It means appointments you never failed to keep, trains you never failed to catch, the opportunities you did not miss. I’ve noticed, too, that bad luck and an unguarded tongue often go together. Then, too, the victim of bad luck is often incapable of team work. That handicaps him from taking part in the big Games. Good fortune is the accident that befalls the fit. There isn’t much perversity of events. The buttered side down of ill luck happens because it is the buttered side. Everything hits the sore spot, but not more than any other. One finds what he is looking for, and all things rush to the service of him who knows how to use them. Our successes are at least collaterally incident to our attempts. We meet casually some day the very mood for which we long have waited. If we carry a botany box of observation we shall gather many specimens. Into the magazine of the eager mind the spark of incident will inevitably drop. Joseph was a “lucky fellow,’ but part of his good luck was that he had an opportunity of demonstrating his fitness for doing large things by his faithfulness to small ones. He had the luck of being a servant. That was his chance. Every fellow who has a job has a chance. Don’t think for a moment that things went smooth and without opposition at the court of Pharahb. There were palace intrifues and high offcials who tried to knife him in the dark. Any man who tries to strike twele finds a dozen hands reaching for the muffler. When ou are at the bottom lots of folks at you on the head and say, “Poor dog! You deserve better,” but start bravely upward and the crowd haunts a rock to hurl at “such an upstart.” News From Other Colleges A student’s organization of Buenos Aires sent a telegram of congratulation to senator Borah expressing gratitude at his “defense of Nicaragua,” and for showing the people in the United States the “true situation.” In Mexico City an association of Central Americans to boycott American goods until the Marines are withdrawn from Nicaragua is being led by Juan Mella, a Cuban student. The association has already sent telegrams to American political leaders’ demanding the withdrawal of American troops. A national Union of Canadian students may be formed, similar to the National Union of England and Wales, the “Confederation Internationale des Etudiantes” of Europe and the National Student Federation of America. Representatives of eleven Canadian colleges and universities met in Montreal during the Christmas vacation to decide whether the project is feasible. In the West Canadian colleges fell an especial need for this union. The “better understanding” which a union would bring about is wanted in these institutions which are at present practically isolated from the rest of the Dominion. The situation is somewhere better in the East, because of an Intercollegiate Union. More than 1,000 persons attended the annual short course for farm people at Albama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn. Sixty countries of the 67 in Albama were represented. Teachers to the number of 114 from British overseas dominions, Canada, Australia, South Africa, and New Zealand, are teaching this year in schools of Great Britain, and the same number of teachers from England and Scotland have gone to replace them temporarily, under the plan for teacher exchange arranged by the British League of Empire. Sherwoods The Sherwood Literary Society met in its regular meeting room on February 14, and rendered the following program: Devotional—Chaplain Debate: Resolved that Japanese and Chinese should be admitted to United States citizenship Affirmative Negative Clyde McDonald Joe McClain Jasper Harp Homer Gates Declamation –Olin Carr. Jokes—Guy Boyd. The negative were successful in obtaining a favorable report from the judges. The affirmative speakers proved that they were competent of consideration as debaters. There were no vacant seats in our meeting room and several of the members were required to stand. Come on, Sherwoods, and let’s make it 100 per cent next time. J.L. Myers made a peppy speech which brought us to a realization of our duty in Society. Dr. Sheeley Here on Feb. 22 On February 22 Dr. F.N. Seerly of New York will be at the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute to speak to students. He comes under the auspices of the Young Men’s Chstian Association and will spend the day in conferences with various groups. Those who remember Dr. Hall who was here a few years ago will look forward to Dr. Seerley’s visit, as his work is similar to that of Dr. Hall. Cumberland University Falls Before T.P.I. Shift their combination as they would and battle to the end as they did, Cumberland University’s Bulldogs were unable to match goals with T.P.I. Golden Eagles, and went down in defeat by 26 to 22 in the Cumberland gym. The constant swapping of the Bulldogs made a good game of one which otherwise probably would have been mediocre. It was a constant repetition of the things all the way. The Eagles would bring the ball up the floor and one of the TPI’s sharpshooters, would pitch a goal and the Bulldogs would slip in and fight their way back up the court and flip in a counter. Things went evenly at times but usually the Eagles kept five or six points in the lead. It was a hard game for the Bulldogs to drop, more so for the reason that Coach Knee thinks his superior to those of TPI Seven Bulldogs saw service, while Coach Overall used but five men. Try as they might, the Lebanons could not find a smooth working combination. Line Up Ten Tech Cumberland H. Evans F Fitts Vaughn F Martin Moss G Robinson Robbins G Goodman Winningham G Hicks Subs: Cumberland Drescall, Layman Importance of Brood Sow on Farm Donald Moore There is no other animal department of the farm that is of more importance than a good brood sow. The farm that keeps a brood sow does not have to depend on the meat market for its meat supply. The cook only goes to the smokehouse without her purse, and not even realizing how much she gets. The farm is looking for cash income; nothing will come nearer filling this demand than a sow. A quick turn-over of feed is realized and usually a nice profit is made. The sow utilizes all garbage such as: skim-milk, buttermilk, kitchen slop, etc., also eats refused feed, and other products from the garden that would otherwise go to waste. The hogs, if the farmer desired, will gather and market his crops. The necessity of pasture for hogs will force the farmer to plant legumes and cover crops, which will be indirectly a great benefit to the farmer. The farm that keeps a sow has available an even supply of quality feeders at all times. The farm that does not have a brood sow on it can easily see where it is losing money both directly and indirectly. Belle Lettres and Sherwoods Sponder Valentine Party A delightful social event of the winter term was the Valentine party given Saturday night Feb. 12 in the TPI auditorium. The room was decorated with red and white crepe peper streamers and hearts. Streamer of paper led from each window to large red heart in the center of the room. The lights were shaded with red paper giving a radiant effect. Games were played in the gymnasium and contests were enjoyed in the auditorium. The ones receiving prizes were Mrs. A.W. Smith, Mayme Gipson and Homer Gates, Jessie Barnes Johnny Bilbrey, Mary Frances Whitson and Harry Burrows. Refreshments were served from the library. The menu included, Heart sandwiches hipolite and cherry sandwiches, Heart mints, nuts in red meat cups and coffee. The chaperones were Mr. and Mrs. Lane, Mr. Lane being Sponsor of the Belles Lettres and Mr. and Mrs. Hatfield. Mr. Hatfield being the Sherwood Sponsor. Other members of the faculty enjoyed the occasion. Because chapel groups hear prominent speakers number barely enough to start a good basketball game and because voluntary chapel means to most a permanent excused absence, the Richmond collegian, University of Richmond Virginia pleads for the return of compulsory services. You can be successful in boosting your town, but don’t try to shove it. Meeting of Alumni executive council (continued from page 1) Were authorized to write the Senator Hensley and Representative Anderson in the name of the Association, asking them to support the Appropriation Bill for this institution which is before the Legislature. Interesting Chapel Address The students of TPI were again fortunate in having Dr. TC. Crume, the evangelist from Kentucky, to speak to them the second at the chapel last Friday. Dr. Crume’s subject was “success” and he made a very inspiring talk. Practically all the students took notes and Dr. Crume has offered a copy of his book, “Evangelism in Action” to the student who will send him the best outlines of both the addresses which he has delivered to the students. He has also presented a copy of this book to the school library and the students appreciate it very much.

1926 January 20

 The Tech Oracle Vadus Carmack Elected Editor-In_Chief of 1927-28 Tech Oracle David Terry Reelected Business manager and Alfred Gill Elected Circulation Manager. At the annual Tech Oracle Staff Banquet on the evening of April 20 Vadus Carmack was elected editor-in-chief of the Tech Oracle for next year. Mr Carmack ahs been the poet on the staff this year and has been contributed many interesting articles other than poetry. He will be a Senior next year and there is no doubt but that he will publish a good paper. Mr. Terry has been a very efficient manager during the past year and has already shown his ability as a business man. Mr. Gill has had experience as assistant circulation manager this year will fill the manager’s place well. T. Club Banquet Held at Methodist Church on May 6 The second annual T. Club banquet took place May 6, in the Sunday School rooms of the Methodist Church. The following Delicious menu was served: Iced Fruit Cocktail, Fried Chicken, Mashed Potatoes, String Beans, Blushing Apples, Rolls, Tomato Salad, Strawberries with whipped cream and Angel cake. Besides the active members of the club present, there were a number of old letter men and women who are honrary members of the club. The program consisted of the following: (1) Football outlook for 1927 –Alva Starnes, Captain. (2) Basketball –Gradis Winningham, Captain (3) Girl’s Basketball –Lucy Whitson, Captain. (4) Baseball –Arlie Moss, Captain (5) Athletics in General –Dr. Howard. (6) Relation of Athletics to Studies –Mr. Lane. (7) Response –Coach Overall. Four New Members Added to Faculty The increased enrollment for the spring short term has necessitated some additional instructors for various departments. M.E.V. Hendrix, a graduate from the University of Tennesse and for the past year principal for the Robertsfield High School at Edgemoor Tennessee, is assisting Mr. Lane in the education department. Mr. W.R. Rogers is instructor in English and History. Mr. Rogers received his B.S. and Master’s degrees in the University of Tennessee and for the past year has been a student in the Southern Baptist Seminary at Louisville, Kentucky. Mr. J.O. West, was principal of the Oneida High School for two years and has also worked in the Robbins High School. He received his training at center () in the Science Department. Miss Stella Gooch is dietician of the dining hall. She is a graduate of Peabody and was formerly manager of the dining hall at the Middle Tennessee Teachers College. Before coming to T.P.I she was dietician at the Nashville General Hospital. “Pirates of Penzance” By T.P.I. Glee Clubs “The Pirate of Penzance” is a Gilbert and Sullivan comic opera in two acts. The two glee clubs of T.P.I. under the direction of Miss Tennie Alma Stanton, head of the music Department, are preparing to give this opera on May 18. The story of the opera is as follows; Fredic, when only a small child was apprenticed to a pirate chief until his twenty-first birthday. This was a through a mistake of his nurse, Ruth, who was told to apprentice him to a pilot. The first act begins with a band of pirates, who are celebrating Frederic’s twenty-first birthday, as he has now become a real pirate, and is an apprentice no longer. Frederic surprises them by saying that he is going to leave them s his apprenticeship is over. Ruth becomes very much alarmed and begs to accompany him as his wife. Frederic never having seen any other woman doesn’t know that she is old and ugly, and decides to marry her. Then the voices of young maidens are heard, and when Frederic sees the difference between them and Ruth, he renounces his old nurse. He is charmed with the beauty of the young girls and offers himself to any one of them. Then all refuse him except Mabel who loves and pities him. As Mabel Frederic and the girls are planning to get away the pirates appear. Each () seizes a girl and they announce that they think this is a first rate opportunity to get married. The Major-General, who is the father of the girls, comes in and asked them to have pity on his lonely state, as he is an orphan and would miss his lovely daughters. So now, it is one of the pirates rules never to harm an orphan, so they release them. In the second act the girls are trying to console their father –the pirates have learned that he has told a terrible story about being an orphan and they are planning to attack again. Frederic is willing to help the Major-General and his daughters as he is now free from the pirates, so with a company of policemen, he prepares to fight the pirates. Then the pirate King and Ruth come to tell Frederic that he is still apprenticed to the pirates for he was born on Feburary 29, and that his twenty-first birthday will not be reached until 1940. Frederic, who has a keen sense of duty goes back to the band. The pirates creep up to the hiding place of Major-General and when they are discovered there is a struggle between them and the police. The police are overcome by pirates who in the turn give up to the police as they are asked to surrender in the name of the Queen. Ruth then discloses a secret: the pirates are all noblemen who have gone wrong. The Major-General then willingly gives his daughters to the expirates who plan to resume their legislative duties. The cast of characters is as follows: Richard, the pirate King; James Green. Frederic, the pirate apprentice; Oyama Winningham Major-General Stanley, of the British Army; Robert Smith Edward, Sergeant of Police; Leonard Crawford. Mabel, General Stanley’s youngest daughter; Dannie Wright Jarvis General Stanley’s daughters. Kate; Virgie Lowery Edith; Bulah Allison Isabel; Elsie Young Ruth, a piratical “Maid of all work”; Emily Stanton General Stanley’s other daughters: Sammie Ruth Womack, Muriel Gipson, Elise Biles, Millie White, Jessie Bar, Ellen Rash, Josephine Carrington, Bertie Brown and Lucile Camerson. Pirates and policemen: Bill Breeding, Clem Allen Womack, Donald Moore, Clyde McDonald, Armon Clark, Eugene Woods, Herman Matheny, and Wallace Mitchell. May Day Festival Enjoyed by Tech Students on May First Miss Rebecca Johnston Crowned Queen of May. –Music and Natural Dancing Featured Program. One of the most attractive programs given at T.P.I. this year was that celebrating May Day. The feature of the day was the cornwing of Miss Rebecca Johnston, a senior, who had been elected by the student body as queen of the May. The following girls were selected to serve as maids to the Queen: Mrs. Eddie Watson and Misses Sammie Ruth Womack, Louise Settle, Lucile Lee, Dan Jarvis, Mary Nilla Graham, Maurine Quarles, Margaret Darwin, Bertie Brown, and Eleanor Haile. Master Thomas Passons acted as crownbearer and the the little Misses McClanahan and Foster served as train () bearers. The approach of the queen was herald by Misses Hazel Thompson and Lena Breeding. The maids wore dresses of organdie in the pastel shades with picture hats of harmonizing colors. The train-bearers wore dainty hand-made voile frocks of lavender and green. The queen was attired in a dress of white flat crepe combined with lace. After the crowning of the queen the audience was entertained by a group of natural dancers who gave a dance of Greetings, Old Rustic, and the Scarf Dance. These dancers were Misses Mary Ellen Rash, Agnes Greenwood, Muriel and Kathleen Gipso. The next number was a dance by the maids. Following this was the May Pole Dance given by Misses Carrie High, Lucile Cameron, Shelah Officer, Grace Wheat, Jessie Barnes, Beulah Allison, Pearl Cornwell, Jonny Bilbrey. Hazel Swafford, Pauline Hudgens, Anna Henry, and Elsie Young. Music for the dances was played by Miss Virginia Wilcox, while Miss Tennie Alma Stanton rendered the march for the processional and recessional. Following the recessional punch was dispensed from an attractive booth. The T.P.I. Orchestra played several numbers. The program was repeated before the Cookeville Lions club at the City School auditorium Monday night at 8:00 o’clock. The affair was directed y Miss Carolyn McClanahan, head of the Physical Department for women, and the costumes were designed by Miss Margaret Johnson, of the Home Economics Department. “Tech Oracle” Staff Hold Banquet The Staff of the “Tech Oracle” held its annual banquet at the Shanks hotel on Wednesday evening, April 20. The banquet table had as its centerpiece a beautiful basket of purple iris, Cutt glass candle sticks tied with purple ribbon held gold candles, spaced along the middle of the table. Place cards and menu cards carried out the purple and gold color-scheme, of the table decorations and the menu was in harmony with it. Miss Hazel Wall, the efficient editor-in-chief of the “Oracle” for the past year was toastmistress for the occasion. Mr. J.M. Hatfield faculty advisor, who has been loyal, faithful and has rendered much aid to the Staff, was the first speaker of the evening; He started the program with a “peppy” talk in which he commended the work of the past year and gave hopes for a successful future. Next Harry Burrows gave a unique lecture, “At The Bat” which showed his skill at making and delivering speeches, Then, Miss Lucile Lee caused an uproar of merriment when she told “The Joke of The Scar.” Next on program was Robert Smith who sang to the accompaniment of his ukulele a number of popular songs. Appreciation of his singing was shown by requests for more, to which he gallantly responded. Last, Vadus Carmack, the poet, read two beautiful poems of his own composition which verified () the fact that he is a “real poet”. After the program the election for 1927-28 Staff was held. Vadus Carmack was elected editor-in-chief for the ensuing year, insuring the success of the “Tech Oracle”. David Terry re-elected for business manager. He has been a capable and efficient worker for the past year and assures T.P.I. of a prosperous paper for next year. Albert Gill was also re-elected. He has been the untiring circulating manager and gives promise of a more active future. These newly elected Staff members will select their assistants at the opening of Fall term of 1927. They are excellent students, true workers, and highly deserving the honor which has been bestowed upon them. The evening’s entertainment was concluded with an extemporaneous speech from each member of the Staff who had not appeared on the program. With much trembling and merriment the banquet was concluded and the Staff proclaimed it was the biggest, best and jollied banquet ever had by a “Tech Oracle” Staff. 160 Students Enrolled at Beginning of Spring Short Term The enrollment of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute is the largest in its history, the freshman college class alone having a greater number of students than were enrolled in the entire college department last year. One hundred and sixty students from various countries over the state were enrolled during the last week, making a total enrollment for the year of five hundred and sixty. The Senior College Class has thirty-four enrolled at president, the second year college forty-five, the first year college class, two hundred and sixty-seven, the fourth year high school class seventy-eight, and the third year high school class seventy-two. All the dormitories are filled to their capacity and many students are boarding in town. A large number come from the near-by towns every day, some driving twenty-five miles. Annual Picnic to be Held on May 24 The annual picnic this year will be at Ozone and Waldensia on the edges of Cumberland and Roane Counties. The places selected are noted for their mild mountain scenery. Beautiful falls are at Ozone and a deep lake for swimming and fishing is at Waldensia. Probably the latter place will be visited during the forenoon and Ozone later. Perhaps a stop of one hour will be made at Crossville on the return trip. As usual, Mr. Hamilton, Tennessee Central Agent at Cookeville is doing all he can to make the train service as excellent as possible. “Ezra, tomorrow is our 25th wedding anniversary; hadn’t we better kill a chicken?” “Why punish the chicken for what happened 25 years age?” Most of the fire in the modern girl’s eye is quenched by the water on their brain. Junior-Senior High School Receptions The Junior High School class entertained the Senior class with a delightful informal Reception, Saturday evening, May the seventh at 8 o’clock in the administration building. The main event of the evening was Treasure Hunt, in which many unique treasures were found. At the close of the evening delicious refreshments were served. Progress of the Shakespearean Play The first full rehearsal of “The Taming of the Shrew” was held Wednesday evening, May 11, and every member of the cast made a creditable showing. This play requires a cast of thirty. In the present cast thirteen Counties are represented. The costumes and scenery have been ordered and the presentation on May 31 will mark another successful event in the history of the institution. Gordonsville Beat T.P.I. Egalets The Reservers suffered their second defeat in the last three games when they met Gordonsville on the local field April 27. The visitors snatched a 2 score lead in the first inning and again added twins in the fourth. Although the locals put out all they had, they were never within real scoring distance. Score by innings: Gordonsville 200 200 000-4 Reserves 000 000 000-0 The Tech Oracle Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Published Semi-Monthly Subscription Rates $1.50 Per Year Editorial Staff Editor-in-Chief Hazel Wall Assistant Editor Eleanor Haile Assistant Editor Benton M. Carr Associate Editors Athletic Harry Burrow Wit and Humor Robert Smith Exchange Alberta Cassetty Class Editor Luccille Lee Society Odell Cornwell Alumni Rebecca Johnston Feature Editor Jonnie Billbrey Poet Vadus Carmack Business Manager David Terry Assistant Business Manager Circulation Manager Paul Tidwell Asst. Circulation Manager Alfred Gill Faculty Advisor J.M. Hatfield Printed by Herald Publishing Company. Entered at the Cookeville Post Office. Second-class rate pending. Tech and the Upper Cumberland What has Tennessee Tech meant to this section of the state? First of all it has furnished work for ambitious students above the high school. The teaching ranks of the Upper Cumberland section have been strengthened and revitalized by this institution. Students go out to places of leadership in their respective communities with a broader, deeper vision and a profound sense of their responsibility in this new social and economic order; and above all they have the training commensurate with the task before them. The Upper Cumberland is rapidly undergoing a change or a series of changes which vitally affect our social, political, and economic life. The rising generation is putting new blood into the fight, the added punch that brings victory is coming from the students of today. Tech is responsible for most of this. We are breaking away from the old moorings of superstition, hide-bound precedent, and intellectual, social, and religious bigotry and intolerance. What is bringing about this new social order? Education. Free and unhampered education is doing more for our people today than any other force. Tech is the center of this educational system in this section and deserves most of the credit for the improvement that has been made. The fact that this institution has outgrown its buildings and equipment is proof that students from half the counties of Tennessee, and four other states realize the opportunities this school has to offer. In the very nature of things the Upper Cumberland has been benefitted more than remote sections. Students have been able to come here for their high school and college work when the opportunity was denied them elsewhere, due chiefly to the economic factor, Tennessee Polytechnic Institute is the greatest force in this section of the state for its material development. I make this statement without fear of a successful contradiction. Our Alma Mater has been to us an oasis in an educational desert, a light-house set on a hill, a power house and a revitalization force such as never touched our lives before. When we leave her, let us be true and ever remember what she has done for. Our debt is heavy. Let us pay it in service to our people. Statistics These wonderful statistics! They tell us now that Colleen Moore, movie star, gets 15,00 “fan letters” every month; Clara Bow, 11,000; and Mary Pickford only 2,000. Lon Chaney, strange to say, leads the male list for letter totals, with John Gilbret and Richard Dix close behind. Ten per cent of this mail comes from people of Polish extraction. They want the pictures that are always sent in return. Many of them never go to the films, it is said, and gets their information from the posters –but a postcard brings a beautiful picture. These photographs, wrapping, and mailing cost the motion picture companies twelve cents each. The large companies pay this charge for their prominent stars, but pity the poor independent who has to foot her own expenses in order to keep “her public” contended. George Sidney, Oliver Borden, and others set side $250 weekly for this purpose –Outlook. $150,000 Appropriated for New Buildings The general Appropriation Bill which was recently passed by the Legislature gives to T.P.I. $150,000 for buildings and $110,000 per year or maintenance. It has not been determined what buildings this fund will be used for, as the State Board of Education will have charge of the building program, but it is thought that a science building, a dining hall and cafeteria, and a gymnasium will be erected. There are some prospects of having an observation school on the campus before very long. This, with $5,000 worth of new library books which are to be added soon, will make the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute a complete teachers training institution. Donald Moore Wins Gold Medal on Essay Donald Moore a student in the department of Vocational Agriculture of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute won the gold medal offered for the best essay by any student studying agriculture under Smith-Hughes teachers of vocational agriculture or any other club member in the 4-H Clubs in Middle Tennessee. There were several thousand contestants in this contest and it took both ability and work to win. Commencement Speakers It is interesting to note the different speakers who have delivered Commencement Addresses and Sermons since the school was established. The list is given below. Elder N.B. Hardeman will deliver the Commencement Sermon for the class of 1927. It is not known who will deliver the address to this class. 1917 –Sermond, Dr. J.H. Stevenson. Address, Mr. T.K. Sisk. 1918 –Sermon, Judge C.E. Snodgrass Address, Dr. Carey Morgan. 1919 –Sermon, Rev. W.S. Claiborne. Address, Dr. J.I. Vance. 1920 –Sermon, Elder Nolan. Address, Judge J.M. Gardenhire 1921 –Sermon, Dr. T.N. Ivey. Address, Mr. Harry Clark. 1922 –Sermon, Elder E.A. Elam Address, Mr. R.L. Jones 1923 –Sermon, Dr. W.P. Stephenson Address, Bishop Maxon. 1024 –Sermon, Judge C.E. Snodgrass Address, Dean Malcolm MrDermott. 1925 –Sermon, Dr. W.H. Dubose. Address, Dr. Shelton J. Phelps. 1927 –Sermon, Elder N.B. Hardeman. Address, ……………….. Contestants for Essay Medal Seven young ladies have entered the essay contest which will be held on Saturday morning May 7 from eight to twelve o’clock. The subject is “The Business Aspect in the Woman’s Life”, and the winner of this contest will be awarded a gold medal, given by Dr. Z.L. Shipley of Cookeville, at commencement. The Belles Lettres Literary Society will be represented by Thelma Music, Elsie Biles, Kathleen Simmons, and Bertha Dunavin. The Palladian Literary Society will be represented by Jonnie Bilbrey, Florence Winfree, and Lucile Thompson. Senior College Class The Seniors had a delightful evening outing on Friday evening April 29, in the form of a hike to Breeding’s mill. Nineteen persons went, including Mr. and Mrs. Overall, the Chaperones, and everybody reported a jolly time. The delegation left the campus about 4:30 and reached the destination about 5:15. Several sandwiches had already been prepared, and cooking utensils were carried to cook, bacon and eggs. All were amply fed, and Eugene Collier ate the remainder. The crowd departed about 3:00, and most of them attended the picture show. Those attended the outing were: Misses Ruth, and Nola Quarles, Lee, G. Whitaker, Wall, Haile, P. Cornwell, Bracey and Johnston; Messrs G. Winningham, Rose, P. Neely, Carlen, Collier, B.M. Carr, Scott, and Johnston; Mr. and Mrs. Overall Chaperones. Cookeville Girl Wins Honor in Oratorical Contest Miss Mary Frances McDerman Wins Way to Semi-finals in Know The South Contest Miss Mary Frances McDearman, one of Cookeville’s most gifted young artists who is a student at the Woman’s College of Alabama, at Montgomery, has added another honor to her long list of honors and to her school by winning the oratorical contest at Auburn where she won over representatives from leading colleges and universities of the South. Miss McDearman will go soon to the Ashville, N.C. National Semifinal Oratorical contest. Another honor given Miss McDearman by her school recently was that she was chosen to represent in the State Contest. Last year she won a similar contest. She won the T.P.I. Reading Contest when a high school student of that institution. Following the close of the school year she will return to Cookeville for a short visit with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.C. McDearman, before going to Ward-Belmont to student again under Miss Pauline S. Towsand. Miss Towsand classes Miss McDearman as one of the most gifted readers among her pupils. –Putnam Co. Herald. Banner Presented to Burritt College On Tuesday May 3, a delegation from the Banner, which the Burrit Preps won in the Upper Cumberland Boy’s Basketball Tournament. The persons making the trip were Messrs Overall, Smith, Passons, Terry, Richardson, and Johnston. A program arranged by the school was supplemented by speeches by the gentlemen from T.P.I. The delegation left Cookeville at 5:30 A.M. and had breakfast on the mountain. The program was arranged for 8:00, and all were back in school at 11:00. Miss Margaret Killeffer Becomes Bride of L. Harris The wedding of Miss Margaret Killeffer and Luther Harris was quietly solemnized at the home of Rev. and Mrs. A.C. Killeffer, parents of the bride, on Monday Morning, May 2, at 6:30 o’clock in the presence of a limited number of friends and releatives. The bride was led to an alter by her brother Lewis Killeffer while Mendelsson’s wedding march was softly played by Miss Anna Lena Livingston. Little Miss Mildred Milligan who bore the bridal train was the bride’s only attendant. Leonard Dunavin served as best man, and the bride’s father, Rev. Killeffer performed the ceremony. The bride was lovely in a gown of white crepe and lace veil with orange blossoms. She carried a beautiful bouquet of bride’s roses and lilies of the valley. Miss Killeffer was formerly a student of T.P.I having graduated from highschool here in 1921. Since that time she has been a student at the University of Tenn. And a most valuable primary teacher of both Putnam and Overton county. The groom was also a former student of T.P.I. and of University of Tennessee. He is at present the Superintendent of Public Schools of Overton County. Dean Smith Delivers Commencement Add. On the night of April 26 Dean A.W. Smith made the Commence address at Byrdstown in the presence of a graduating class of eight. On the following day seven of these students had matriculated at the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute and during the summer school the eighth one is to be in this institution. Last year the graduating class of the Pickett County High School consisted of two young ladies, both of whom are now students in the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Several of the junior class are also students here this term. The Pickett County High School was established only a ew years ago and has had a very remarkable growth. This year It enrolled sixty-five high school students. This makes the fourth Commencement address that Dean Smith has made within the last few months. At ten o’clock on May 17 Dean Smith is to make the Commencement Address to the graduating class at the White County High School at Sparta. Quite a number of the graduates from this school have been coming to Tennessee Polytechnic Institute and have shown that they have had a very through foundation in the high school subjects. These students have already made good and their presence is appreciated by the administration and student body. The Belles Lettres Society The Belles Lettres met April 18 in the auditorium to try out the readers for the reading contest. At this meeting it was decided to postpone the tryout until some old members should come in at the beginning of the spring short term. April 26 the Belles Lettres met in the regular meeting room and gave “Mother Goose Up-To Date”. The program was enjoyed by both students and visitors. Miss Carmack, Miss Bohannon, and Belles Lettres sponsor Mr. Lane, each made an interesting talk. The Essay contests for the Belles Lettres are Thelma Music, Kathleen Simmons, Bertha Dunavin, and Elsie Biles. Two girls who were visiting the Palladian Literary Society sent their names in to the Belles Lettres expressing their desire to become members. The Society accepted them. There being no further business the Society adjourned. Y.W.C.A. Saturday night, April 23 the Y.W. and Y.M.C.A. gave a banquet to which the dormitory students were invited. After the banquet was over both organization elected officers for the following year. The officers for the Y.W.C.A. are as follows: Persident –Auby Scott. Vice Pres. –Elsie Praper. Sect. and Treas. –Rosalene Ledbetter. Chm. Of Prog. Com. –Hazel Swafford. Counselor –Miss Rose. Miss Rose and Mr. Kittrell were present and both made splendid talks. Miss Weaver, the out going president made a interesting farewell speech. Miss Scott expressed her appreciation of the honor done her. Resolution Passed By he Executive Council of The T.P.I. Alumni Association The sum of one hundred dollars shall be set aside each year from the annual membership dues and other funds of the T.P.I. Alumni Association for the establishment of two cash scholarships of fifty dollars each, hereafter known as the Alumni Scholarships, one each for the young women and the young men of the first year college class of T.P.I. These scholarships shall be awarded each year during commencement, to the young woman and young man of the first year college class who have made the highest average grades in their class work during the freshman year. The final term average , for each subject taken as shown by records in the Dean’s office shall be used in computing the yearly average, which computations shall be made by a committee of the faculty appointed by the president of the Institution. In order to be eligible for either of these scholarships a student must be in attendance at the school throughout the freshman year and carry at least 14 credit hours work. It is understood that the winners of thee scholarships will use the money to help defray actual school expenses during the first or second asucceeding school year and to this end the money will be placed on deposit with the Bursar of the school and a certificate (good for $50.00 as stipulated herein) issue each of the winners. If for any reason the winner of a scholarship should not use same in the manner herein set forth, within one year after the award is made, then the money reverts to the treasury of the Alumni Association. The T.P.O. alumni association hereby pledges itself to make all necessary arrangements for the perpetuation and annual awarding of these scholarships. This the 25th day of April, 1927. Alumni Executive Council Bryce D. Stone, President Leonard Dunavin T.W. Kittrell Odell Cornwell Rebecca Johnston Elanor Haile Hazel Wall, Secretary Mr. Lane: --“Do you know what they call lemons in Sioux City? Dumb-bell Hix: --“No, what do they call them?” Mr. Lane: --“Lemons.” The meanest professor was the one who borrowed a knife from a student to sharpen his pencil and then marked him down a flunk. Alumni Banquet Plans are being made for the largest attendance at the Alumni Banquet on June 2 in the history of the association. A prize will be given to the College Class having the greatest percent of its membership present. Reservations are being made and every Alumnus within reach should make a special effort to attend this Banquet. Sophomore Class The Sophomores are glad to welcome the new students who are registered as second year college students into the class activities outside the classroom as well as in class work. The class is now working hard on the plans for the reception for the senior college students which will be given in the main building on the evening of May 13. The following committees have been appointed to plan the entertainment. Entertaining committee: Mr. Myers, Miss Scott and Miss Graham. Refreshment committee: Mr. Carmack, Mr. Whitefield, Miss McClarty and Miss Bilbrey. Decorating committee: Mr. Burrow, Miss Hennessee and Miss Windell. With these efficient committees as leaders there can be no doubt that the senior will be given an enjoyable reception. Flora Montgomery –Reporter Algood Grab Game from Reserves Coming from a 3 run lead to win in the 9th, Algood took a strange game from the Reserves by noising out by a 7 to 8 score Monday afternoon April 25, the game being played on their own pasture. That right-about-face ball game should never have been, the Reserves should have won it in the regular nine acts, 7 to 4, maby 7 to 5 or 6. As the second guessers would sum it up, the Algooders should never have been allowed to persecute Gates until the count was even tied, after he had been staed to a 3 run lead by Watson through the first 7 innings. Score by innings: Reserves 002 020 300-7 Algood 200 020 004-8 Upper Cumberland and Palladian Literary Sociteies The Upper Cumberland and Palladian Literary Societies met in the auditorium on Monday afternoon, April 25, for a joint program. A very delightful musical program with dramatic presentation of the following popular songs was rendered: “That’s a Good Girl” –Elsie Young and Agnes Greenwood, Chorus –Robert Smith “Mary Lou” –Lauren O’Dell and Agnes Greenwood, Chorus-Mary Ellen Rash. “I Never See Maggie Alone” –Robert Smith and Mary Ellen Rash. Chorus –Beulah Allison. “Sunday” –Robert Smith and Mary Ellen Rash. Chorus –Dannie Wright Jarvis. Declamations by Donald Moore and Elmo Willeford were also interesting features on the program, which was concluded by several numbers by the Upper Cumberland and Palladian Orchestra. These two societies extend a cordial invitation to all new students to visit their meetings at any time and assure each one a hearty welcome. Reserves Trim Celina A day in which all the characteristics of an ideal baseball day were lacking, did not keep the Tech Reserves and Celina apart, April 21. The Reserves administrated a 8 to 6 drebbing. A goodly number of errors were piled up on either side and it was somewhat of a tug-of-war affair to see which individual player could make the most errors. The Reserves did the greater part of their scoring while the game was young and the visitors brought up their end of the scoring largely in the latter part of the game. Score by innings: Celina 000 110 002—6 Reserves 303 110 000—8 Tech Wins 4 to 3 From Union Coach Overall’s baseball team won a close game from Union University April 20 with a score of 4 to 3. Moss started on the mound for the Eagles and pitches a good brand of ball until he was released by Summers in the 6th to save his arm. A feature of the game was three straight two-sackers hit by Winningham, K. Evans, and Nixon in the third inning which brought in two scores. Behind the almost air-tight pitching of Moss the Eagles grabbed off a lead and held it throughout the game. The game to be played the following day was canceled due to too great amount of moisture in the atmosphere. Score by innings: Union 100 010 100—3 Tech 102 000 100—4 Bethel Breaks Tech’s Line of Victories Lefty Summer’s string of victories came to an untimely and to a large extent, unjustifiable termination, Saturday afternoon April 30, at Bethel College, the Kentuckyans taking adcantage of a cross-eyed umpire and of some fielding remissness. The eagles were only able to get 3 hits off the Kentucky pill slinger. The play of both teams slumped in the fielding and off-color base running cut down the score to 2 to 1. There be those days when the best ball players go cross-eyed and so ‘tis with some umpires. Score by innings. Tech 000 000 100—1 Bethel 000 020 000—2 Jokes “How would you like to sign up with me for a life game?” said Arlie “I’m agreeable”, said Rebecca “where’s the diamond?” M. Foster: --“here’s where you missed Manganese.” Adelle Crowder: --“I don’t know Miss Manganese.” Jobe: --“I’m just debating whether to give you a book or a kiss. Which would you rather have?” Shiela: --“I can’t read.” Harry Burrow: --“How come you’re all wet?” Alenn Scott: --“I fell in a barrel of cider.” H.B.: --“Didja get hurt?” A.S.: --“No, it was soft cider.” Preacher: --“Have you heard the story about the wicked flea? Dumbbell: “Well?” Preacher: --“The wicked flee when no man pursueth.” Elderly Newsdealer: -“Evening Sun?” Small Boy: --“Evening, Sir.” Dean Smith: --“I’m a man of few words.” Mr. Lane: --“I know. I’m married too.” “He done me wrong,” wailed the algebra problem, as the freshman handed in his exam paper. Don’t buy thermometers now. They will be lower next winter. “This being good is too much trouble.” “Yeah, it’s too much like carrying life insurance; you have to die to get anything out of it.” “What an iinocent girl she is.” Yeah; it has taken her years to acquire that innocence.” “Twinkle, twinkle, cheap cigar, how I wonder what you are.”

1927 May 5

 THE TECH ORACLE “EAGLES” PLAY CUMBERLAND FRIDAY Number of Students to Accompany Team On next Friday, November 20th, Tech meets an old rival in Cumberland University, and judging from their present season’s record, one whom it will be difficult to defeat. They won from the Tennessee “Doctors,” 17 to 0, who were defeated by the famous Centenary College team only 17 to 14. They held the strong University of Chattanooga team to a 12 to 7 score, who the next week defeated Mercer by a similar count. Coaches Overall and Smith saw the Carson-Newman game and both are of the opinion that Cumberland should have won. In weight their team will compare favorably with an in the South, averaging about 185 pounds. In Martin, from the University of Oklahoma they have a 225 pound tackle, whose play has been outstanding all fall. “Goob” Vaden, a former Tech man, and for the last three years a mainstay on the Milligan College team, is now a “Bulldog” lawyer. He happens to weigh 180 lbs, and is the lightest man on the regular squad. The two ends, Hicks and Wesson are heavy and experienced men and both good at their positions. In Singleton, from Texas, they possess a triplethreat man of no mean ability. He is a punter of repute and will push Hughes for punting honors. The ability of “Tiny” Knee has been demonstrated to Tech teams before, to our great sorrow. We know what to expect from him. Our team knows what it is up against and are preparing to “do or die.” With the student body squarely behind them we are going to carry off the banner of victory. Let’s show them we are for them by our presence at the game. The probable Line-ups: Tech L.E. Hicks Brown L.T. Martin Moss L.G. Grant Clark C. Humphries Miller R.G. Vaden Wilson R.T. Wesson Watson R.E. Wesson Hughes Q.B. Singleton Lewis L.H. Brooks Starnes R.H. Knee Jobe F.B Cockrill WITH THE ALUMNI A number of graduates of T.P.I., have received degrees from other institutions. Those who received their degrees from Peabody College are located in the following places. Constance Gregory is reaching in West Palm Beach, Florida. Naomi Ensor is also teaching in () David Lipscomb College in Nashville. Mamye Fox, as Mrs. William Locker, is living in Gallatin. Dorothy Gregory is teaching in San Marcus, Texas. Rettie Ensor is teaching in Texas. Lilian Smartt is teaching in the Algood High School, Algood, Tenn. Thelma Rose is teaching Home Economics in T.P.I. Valeria Burton is teaching in Florida. Mary Tom Quarles is teaching in the Williston High School in Williston Florida. Victor McClain received his degree from Vanderbilt and is now engaged in engineering work in New York. Johannon Noonan received her degree from the University of Tennessee. She taught in the Cookeville High School last year. Ruth Gwaltney received her degree from Tennessee College and is teaching in Lenoir City this year. Walter Ross Burton received his degree from Columbia and is practicing law in Miami, Florida. Bascome Countiss received his degree from the University of Illinois and is connected with the Department of Agriculture of that University. Wm. A. Morgan is superintendent of the Nuyaka, Okla. Sudie Mary finley is teaching music in Lebanon after receiving her degree from Cumberland University. Barlett McCormick taught in Mulligan, S.C., last year, having received his degree from Milligan College. Thos. M. Lowe received his degree from the Massachusetts School of Technology and now has a position in the University of Florida. Liza Anderson, Leonard Dunavin, and Odessa Johnson are graduates of Carson-Newman College. Miss Anderson, as Mrs. Bedford Morgan, now resides in Cookeville. Leonard Dunavin has a position in the University of Florida. Liza Anderson, Leonard Dunavin, and Odessa Johnson are graduates of Carson-Newman College. Miss Anderson, as Mrs. Bedford Mogran, now resides in Cookeville Leonard Dunavin has a position in the Algood High School and Odessa Johnson is teaching in the Holston High School, Blountville, Tenn. Cleburne Hatfield received his degree from the University of Tennessee and is now teaching in Chattanooga. “GO TO COLLEGE MOVEMENT” Received Unanimous Endorsement of Tech College Students! The members of the United College Classes met in the auditorium on Tuesday, October 10, to perfect plans for a “Go to College Campaign” which will be conducted throughout this section of the state. Briefly stated, the plan is this: the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute extends to every member of the senior classes of all high schools in this section a free subscription to the Tech Oracle for one year. The Tech College Student Body agrees to furnish the material for, and to cooperate with the Oracle Staff in editing a special column in the paper devoted to this campaign. The aim of the campaign is to show by facts and figures the beneficial effect of a college education on every activity of life. We printed, in the preceding issue of the Oracle, statistics which prove this contention beyond question, and abundant evidence and information in furtherance of this topic will be given in succeeding issues. The Tech Collegians voted unanimously in favor of the Campaign, pledging their support to put it over in true Tech style. WORK TO BEGIN ON DRAMA At a recent meeting of the college students, Mr. Stone, president of the organization appointed a committee to cooperate with Messrs. Passons and McClanahan in selecting a suitable Shakespearean play to be given by the organization during the latter part of the school year. The Committee: C.W. Davis, Chairman, Rebecca Johnston, Martha Sedivak, Hazel Wall, Robert Rose, Douglas Robbins, Harry Draper. The committee is expected to report its selection within the next two weeks. FACTS ABOUT FRESHMEN The 1925 Freshman College Class is one of the most interesting first year classes that has entered T.P.I. in years. This class is mature and well-balanced, and its members lack much of that greenness so characteristic to freshmen. T.P.I. welcomes this class very cordially. No former freshman class has seemed to catch the Tech spirit so readily as they have. We members of the first year class number 55. There are thirty two boys and 22 girls. The average age of the boys is twenty years and that of the girls is eighteen years and four months. The freshmen are taking courses in many different departments of () the school. Seven are taking Agriculture, eight Engineering, twenty Home Economics, ten Commercial work, and ten are taking the regular academic work. The first year students represent twenty-seven counties and sixteen high schools. Seven have taught school, and thirty-six have travelled out of the State of Tennessee. The following counties are represented by at least one student in the first year class: Scott, Morgan, Dickson, Overton, Robertson, Jackson, Clay, Putnam, Sequatchie, Pickett, Monroe, McMinn, Montgomery, and Hamilton. The three magazines that are read most by the members of this class are: The Literary Digest, The American and the Ladies Home Journal, By far the most popular authors with the freshman are: Harold Bell Wright, Zane Grey, James Oliver Curwood, and Gene S. Porter. We are expecting great things of this class, forty of whom intend to go to college four years and get a degree. Just Another Victory for Tech On last Friday the Tech “Golden Eagles” won another victory –this time at the expense of Hiwassee College. But as the score indicates it was just another victory, for a 39 to 2 count doesn’t reveal much opposition. Or else, journeying thru the beautiful and picturesque Sequatchie Valley, our team was filled with such feeling of sublimity that when the game was on it rose to the ethereal heights from which it would not be downed. Anyway, we came away with with the verdict and the honor of being, according to Hiwassee players, the best team seen on the Hiwassee field this year, the U.T. Freshman notwithstanding. They declared that our blocking was almost unsurpassable as well as unpassable. Jobe Dowell, Watson, and Wilson were the outstanding players for Tech. Jobe was especially efficient on off-tackle plays—gaining at will. Dowell’s skirting of the ends for fifteen and twenty yards was another feature and a frequent one at that. Wilson, playing his usual stellar game at tackle, had no less than five chances to score, once on a kick-off, twice on recovery of end punts. But each time, after eluding almost the entire Hiwassee team, the last man brought him down. The greatest individual honors, however, must go to Watson, our versatile right end. It seemed that he could not miss. On () four occasions he snagged the oval for distances of thirty yards and more. Once he caught one over the end zone, which does not count. Hughes’ punt averaged forty yards despite the fact that much of the kicking was against the wind. For Hiwassee Dickenson played a great defensive game. Hiwassee scored their only points when Dowell, in attempting an end run, was forced far enough back to e downed behind his own goal line, thus resulting in a safety for Hiwassee. The line-up and summary: Watson L.E. Dickenson Brown L.T. Deakins Moss L.G. Hall Clark C. Youell Miller R.G. Waner Wilson R.T. Lewis Davis R.E. Crockett Hughes Q.B. Hudson Lewis L.H. Kennedy Starnes R.H. Martin Jobe F.B. Cox Scoring touchdowns: Jobe, 4; Dowell, 1; Starnes, 1. Points after touchdowns: Hughes, 3. Score: Tech 39 Hiwassee 2 Referee, Sloan (U.T.); Umpire, Robinson (U.T.); Head Linesman, Carson (Maryville); Timekeeper, Hines (U.T.).

1925 November 19

 Football Edition THE TECH ORACLE THE 1924 FOOTBALL SQUAD FOOTBALL SQUAD HONORED WITH BANQUET Letters Awarded to Sixteen Men MILLER ELECTED CAPTAIN The annual football banquet was given on Friday night, December 9, in the administration building. A large table extended the full length of the lower hall, and had for its decorations a central vase of gold chrysanthemums tied with purple tulle; smaller vases of chrysanthemums and ferns were placed at intervals on both sides of the central vase. Purple and gold candles were also used in carrying out the color scheme of purple and gold. A delicious four-course menu was served, consisting of: Fruit Cocktail Turkey Dressing Cranberries Candied Sweet Potatoes Celery Corn Bread Sticks Frozen Salad Cheese Straws Plum Pudding Hard Sauce Mr. A.W. Smith acted as toast-()master, and the program for the evening was as follows: 1. A Charge to the Team of 1925; Dewitt Puckett 2. Response, Merrill Hughes. 3. Athletics in Life, President Q. M. Smith 4. Awarding of Letters, Captain Hill 5. Election of Captain for 1925 6. Review of the Season, Coach Overall. 7. Response, Captain of 1925 Others called on for short talks were: Miss Elsie Jobe, “Buff” Lefevre, Dean of Tech football; Manager Lee Sadler Darwin and “Doc” Hudgens. James D. Miller was elected captain for next year. He is deserving of this honor, for he has just finished his fifth year as a member of the varsity and has always been a worker on the football field and in other school activities as well. The team should be successful under his leadership. Sixty letters were awarded to members of the varsity, and several other members of the squad received honorable mention. The banquet with its beautiful decorations, delectable menu, pleasant music, together with the words of commendation and praise for the players, was a fitting conclusive to a most successful football season, and a just tribute to the best football team that Tech has ever had. OUR FOOTBALL SEASON By Hendon Johnston We have just closed perhaps the greatest football season in the history of Tenn Tech. We did not win every game, neither did Napoleon win every battle, but never before have we made so creditable a showing against schools of the class we have just been competing with. A glance at the score card will show only three defeats, abains five victories and one tie. Two of these defeats were practically due to the fact that we were very late in getting our practice season started. Both teams, with whom we met de()feat in the early part of the season started their practice season at least three weeks earlier than we did. The season started on Oct. 3, at Livingston, and Tech emerged the victor by a count of 32-0. It was a Lebanon; on Oct. 10, that we suffered most from lack of team work. Tech had several chances to score in the initial half, but the failure of our interference made these vain, and the already polished Castle Heights team, by consistent team work were able to roll up a score of 20-0. The following week, our team still lacked polish and we were again trampled by a score of 14-0. This time we bowed to the Cumberland “Bulldogs.” On Oct. 24. We journeyed to Murfreesboro and handed the “Normalite” the sting of a 6-0 defeat. The following week, our team was reaching its real form, and we ran wild through the strong Hiwassee team, winning by a score of 26-0. The next week we retained the winning spirit and defeated the Bethel College aggregation to the tune of 22-6. In this game, both the offense and defense were powerful machines. On Nov. 15 our team went to Chattanooga and played the Freshmen from the city’s university. Even the papers of that city admitted that we outplayed the Frosh but the breaks of the game gave them two scores and they trample us 14-0. On Nov. 22 Ogden College, of () Bowling Green, Ky., brought their gridsters to town and met us in a sea of mud. Slipping and sliding, and more slipping and sliding gave each team a touchdown, neither kicked goal and the game ended a 6-6 tie. On Turkey Day we scalped Livingston Academy. Our boys seemed over-confident and made 7 points only in the first half, but came Lack strong in the last half and piled up the score to 55-0. Much of the credit of the success of the past season must go to Coach Overall, for there is no denying that he welded to ether the first real football team Tech has ever had. To start the season, only seven letter men returned. The remainder was to be developed from men who came, with only high school experience. With these handicaps, and a very rigid schedule ahead he developed a polished machine that was to make a credible record. He developed, in Hughes, a local boy, one of the best punters in the state. He converted Jobe from an end to a back of no mean ability. He changed Clark from a guard to an excellent center. Such feats as these are not accomplished by ordinary football coaches, and we should be exceeding grateful that we have so capable a man to guide our gridiron activities. Let us not think that a coach is a football team, for all along with the coach there were 25 men who worked earnestly and faithfully in order that their Alma Mater should be honored. Several of these men were new-comers, but they at once grasped the school spirit and began the gruesome work. Of the old men who returned. Hill and Puckett, ends, played as they never played before, they tackled, blocked, covered punts and caught passes in excellent style. These two men will likely not return for another season, much to the sorrow of all concerned, and their places will be hard to fill. LeFevre, Starnes, Jackson and Clark, the linemen who returned, gave accounts of themselves both in victory and in defeat. Injuries kept LeFevre and Clark out of several games, but they were always on the job when duty called them. Davis was developed from last year’s reserves into a good runner and an excellent punter. Among the new-comers who made good were Winningham, end, from Livingston. Although he was not one of the first eleven he was ever ready to enter the fray when called upon. Bynum and Suggs, the new linemen, were both powerful men both in the offense and defense. Bynum was perhaps the strongest man in the entire offense, as he often broken through and nailed opposing backs for substantial losses. Suggs was an excellent guard and center. When Clark was injured Suggs at once shouldered the pivot responsibility, and ably did he commit himself. Keene was also ready to enter the battle at any time. The new backfield men were Jobe, Russell and Blount. Jobe, fullback, was not only an able pigskin packer, but he was a bulwark on the defense. He baked the line in a style not shown by a single opponent during the entire season. Russell was a good general, a good runner, and a good tackler. Blount was an excellent runner, a fine passer, and a good field goal kicker. Another important functioneer of the squad was the manager, Mr. Lee S. Darwin filled this place very ably. He never tired of the grueling job of issuing and receiving the suits daily. He arranged an attractive schedule, and put the season over as a money making proposition. The annual banquet, honoring the football team, was held Friday night, Dec. 5, at which Jimme Miller, a veteran of five seasons, was elected to captain the ’25 squad. We sincerely hope that he can return more letter men than was the case this year, and that he shall have a most successful season. Puckett is the only man that will be lost by graduation. Hill and LeFevre say that they will not return. All the other men should and probably answer the first call for practice in ’25. The figures for the season are shown below: Tech 32. Livingston 0 Tech 0, Castle Heights 20 Tech 0, Cumberland ‘4. Tech 6 M.T.N. 0. Tech 22, Bethel College in 0 Tech 26, Hiwassee College ‘0 Tech 0. U. of C. Freshmen 14. Tech 55, Livingston 0. Tech 6, Ogden College 6. Tech 146 totals: opponents 60 won 5 lost 3 tied 1. HIGHER EDUCATION PAYS The United States Bureau of Education brings out some statistics to bolster up the self-respect of that much derided thing, the college diploma. It points out that although less than one per cent of all Americans are college graduates, this one per cent has furnished 55 per cent of the presidents, 36 per cent of the members of congress, 47 per cent of the speakers of the house, 54 per cent of the vice-presidents, 62 per cent of the secretaries of state, 50 per cent of the secretaries of the treasury, 67 percent of the attorneys general and 69 per cent of the justices of the supreme court. As it figures it, the college man’s chances for eminence is 370 to 1 against the non-college man. Even more surprising is its showing that 277 times as many college men had amassed wealth as had non-college men: This proportion is expected to grow sharply in the next fifty years, for the colleges are now turning their attention largely to preparation for success in business careers. –Kansas Teacher. COLLEGE FOOTBALL By John J. Bell The arguments set forth by the opponents of football are well known. They tell us that it is too rough: that it takes too much of the player’s time and that whatever benefits it affords are limited to a few men, since only a small percentage of the students can make the team. The writer of this article was at one time numbered with these critics. He still doubts the wisdom of schedules so strenuous as are engaged in by some of the secondary schools. The writer has never played football, and has no technical knowledge of the game () But observation has convinced him of the value of college football. On the whole, injuries are minor, fatalities rare, and compared with other activities of life there in nothing alarming in the game. Records show that football players make as good, and often better, grades than other students. Merit, not favoritism, is responsible for their record. Sit in the classroom and observe football men for yourself. Their recitations are in harmony with their examination grades. A demonstrated fact has greater value than a general and unfounded argument. And football teaches the importance of teamwork, the subordination of the individual in the interest of the squad and the school, a lesson of prime () importance in every activity of life. A friendly biographer of a noted English statesman mentions as his hero’s fundamental weakness, his inability to do team work. He could not lose sight of himself. Was not the cardinal difference between Lincoln and Douglas to be found here? The relative unimportance of the individual is an accepted fact among football men. Informed persons know there is nothing that can foster a greater school spirit than football. A school lives as much by its spirit as by its scholastic achievements. The successful business man who never learned in youth to lose himself in some kind of enthusiasm leads a drab, colorless existence, and is an object of pity. Vocal athletics from the sideline are beneficial. In his old age, Charles Darwin expressed regret because he had shut such things from his life. Our aim should be the Greek ideal of “moderation in everything.” Clean, honest football is aiding the colleges in producing political, social, and economic leaders for the future. Investigate and be convinced. DO YOU WANT THE ORACLE? The Oracle, like all other school papers, depends on the support of the student body for its finances. We have made this subscription rate as low as popossible50 cents per term, yet only a very small per cent of our more than three hundred students have subscribed, and but little more than half the number of pledged subscribers have paid up () This condition is an alarming indication of a lack of cooperation and college spirit, but even more serious is the relationship that the paper cannot be published without the support of the students. Whether or not we continue to have a college paper will be determined during registration week at the beginning of next term. If you have any loyalty to your school and any spirit of cooperation, you will see the manager of the Oracle while you are matriculating and pay him one dollar for the next two term’s subscription. After New Years all copies of the Oracle will be mailed directly to the subscribers. (Signed) James Miller Business Manager CO-ED BASKETEERS FAST GETTING INTO FORM Many Aspirants For Every Position on Team SCHEDULE NOW COMPLETE The Co-ed cage machine is almost ready to function. A plan is fast being perfected whereby this machine in operation can cage more balls in allotted time than any other organization of its type. All foes and fellow basketeers will have to go beyond the standard heretofore set if they expect to retain the record already established against this team. It is hard as yet to tell who will comprise the fighting five. Vaughn and Whitson are struggling for permanent place at center and as things now stand upon one of these will rest the responsible position. The center is the pivot of the entire team in the two court system and the success of the team is hinged upon an efficient person to occupy this place good at both defensive and offensive play. Shipley and Shanks are working well together as forwards and are () being kept at their highest speed by Van Hooster and Clark who have determined that the forwards shall reach the very highest efficiency or else surrender the reigns. A strong defensive force is hard at work. Moore, Haile, McKeel. And Wheat are the best. McDearnman, Whitson, Scott, and Starnes are other regulars keeping check. Games are being scheduled with Cumberland. Maryville, Carson-Newman, Y.W.C.A. of Nashville, Teachers College of Harrisonburg, Va., and E.T.S.N., all to be played on the local floor. Trips are being arranged through Middle Tennessee, East Tennessee and parts of Kentucky. A FRIEND—WRONG OR RIGHT There is an old judge of the Supreme Court in New York who recently in private conversation was heard to defend one of his friends who has fallen by the wayside. He was challenged for defending a man who had been proved to be wrong. “That was only one failure.” Fine things about him—“said the old judge. “Consider the “But,” objected one of the critics, “I don’t see how you can stand up for this fellow even if he is a friend. He certainly was wrong.” “Any man will stand up for you when you are right,” replied the old judge. “But it takes a friend to stand up for you when you are wrong.” And there was silence. If regrets were erasers, the world’s history would have been rubbed off the page. HISTORY OF CLASS OF 1918 This is the first attempt to write a history of any of the graduating classes of this institution. We are very much interested in the careers of the members of each class, because we realize that our school must build its reputation upon the records of its graduates. If possible we have a more kindly feeling toward the class of 1918 than any other because it was the first to go out into the world from this school. Material is scanty and often confusing, “But such as we have, we give it unto thee.” Roll: Class of 1918 Nancy Fry Constance Gregory Edith Hutchenson Victor McClain Josephine Terrell Virgil Wall Willard Wirt Emily Sue Dow Bryan Cowden Nancy Fry attended Peabody for some time after leaving Tech. She is now engaged in teaching Home Economics at Halls, Tennessee. The high school inspector has pronounced her a very efficient teacher. Constance Gregory, who received her degree from Peabody College last year, is now at her home in Cookeville. The whereabouts and activities of Edith Hutcheson and Virgil Wall and unknown. Victor McClain received his degree in Engineering at Vanderbilt in 1922. For a time he taught in this institution. He is now in New York, employed as an electrical inspector. Reports are that he is making good. There is one relief from writing the prosaic, practical history of the class. A romance crept in for two of its members and contrary to the manner in which such affairs between classmates end. Willard Wirt and Josephine Terrell are now married and living happily in Franklin, while he is connected with a published house in Nashville. Two members of the class, Emily Sue Dow and Bryan Cowden died soon after graduating. It is better to give than receive but it requires more expensive apparatus. Know the true value of time. Snatch, seize and enjoy every moment of it. No illness, no laziness. Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today. PALLADIAN The Palladian Society has begun a series of programs on picture study, which are not only interesting, but educational also. Each week a picture is selected and several stories are written from it. Then the best one is selected by the vote of the majority of the society members and is to be printed in the Oracle. The stories this week were written by Audrey Huffmeister, Lucile Cameron and Henrietta Jared. The story written by Lucile Cameron, “The Lemonade Stand,” was chosen as best. This story will be published in the next issue of the Oracle. BELES LETTRES The Belles Lettres Literary Society met in the regular meeting room Nov. 24, 1924, and rendered a very interesting Thanksgiving program: Origin of Thanksgiving –Effie Wood Thanksgiving Reading –Lydia Wheat Talks were made by members of the society. A noticeable improvement in the work of the Beles Lettres Society may be seen in the increased attendance, and in the excellence of the programs, all of which are well prepared. UPPER CUMBERLAND On Monday afternoon, Dec. 8, the Upper Cumberland Literary Society held its last regular meeting of the fall term. A very interesting program was rendered inspiring talks were made by Pres. Lefevre and Jno J. Bell. Society spirit seemed at its best. Many of our members have decided to enter the annual intersociety contests and they are determined to win. Each member has resolved to come back after the holidays and make 1925 the most successful year of the society. The society is fortunate in having men of executive ability like I.B. Lefevre. Mr. Lefevre has made an efficient president for the fall term. We admire “Buff” Lefevre for the record he has made in athletics. We love him for generous heart and his ever willingness to help us. We are indebted to him for the good he has done the Upper Cumberland Literary Society. All of us are looking forward to the time when Dean Smith will tell us the Wilson Banner is ours for another year. We are determined to win and we hope when say the truthfulness of our motto, the year’s work is ended we can “Retermination is success,” has been proven SHERWOOD The Sherwoods met in their regular meeting room on Monday afternoon, Dec. 1. President Hatfield presided and the following program was rendered: Invocation –Chaplain. Declamation—Lee Leonard Debate: Resolved: That the U.S. should take and control, Mexico. Affirmative, Dred L. Shipley, Aubrey C. Cooper; negative, Robert M. Rose, Willis Huddleston. Jokes –Willie Gentle The decision in the debate was in favor of the affirmative. The debaters showed that they had spent some time in preparation for the debate and some interesting facts were developed. The Sherwoods have an unusually hard task ahead of them this year. After holding the place of unquestioned supremacy since 1917, they find the Wilson Banner, emblematic of supremacy, in the hands of their opponents. On top of this nearly all of the leaders of last year failed to return to school this year, on account of graduation and other reasons. But the remaining loyal Sherwoods are bravely carrying the colors forward and prospects are bright, indeed, for a return to our rightful place at the top. Poet’s Corner DREAMS The silver moon is riding high, My soul exults anew, My thoughts are roving always nigh In Loveland, dear, with you. Your phantom flies before my eyes. Your lissome form I see; My dreams evolve in smothered sighs— A lover will I be. Beneath a silver moon, my dear, I dream of love and you, Of losing you I only fear, I wonder what I’ll do. I love you, little girl so fair, I wonder if I’ll pay. Don’t throw me down, but do me square. I love you; will I stay? A year has passed, my love has grown. I fought, but you have won. I love you, little girl, my own When all is said and done. --Alex Shipley. A HAMLET ON CHRISTMAS To give or not to give –that’s the question Whether it is wiser at this time to please The hearts and souls of the frailer sex Or to hoard the precious shekels for a selfish cause And reap a greater benefit. To give—to gratify And through their pleasure make a hit With each and every one who now expectant waits Til I a hero am—‘tis a consummation Greatly to be wished. To give—to please— To give and to fail to please; ay there’s the rub; For even if I study their desires The thought that each a special yearning has Must give me pause: ‘tis but a chance That some stray gift may strike the mark While all the rest will be a vain expenditure And with one smile I may accumulate The scorn of Jane, the chilling glance of May, The ire of Genevieve, the sneers of Ruth, The taunting jibes of Hazel, and the hate of Anne, And every form of discontent, When all their hearts may be preserved, and treasure, too By a mere Christmas card. --Penn. Punch Bowl. A FLAPPER Little Co-ed of Tennessee Tech, Enamelled just right up to neck Loved beneath your rouge and paint Like a siren, tho’ a saint. With your eyes you work the men, Cut your diet ‘til you’re thin, Look so wild and yet you’re tame, Men can tell you’re quite a flame. Sling your line as slung of old Full of fire and frightfully bold, You’re sweet and truthful for a while As the sorceress of the Nile. Is it worth your time and cost, In the end you know you lost; Petite—passionate—to a sigh, Little Towhead of T.P.I. --Alex Shipley ME Let me be a little kinder, Let me be a little blinder, To the faults of those about me Let me praise a little more, Let me be, when I am weary, Just a little more cheery; Let me serve a little better, Those that I am striving for; Let me be a little braver, When temptation bids me waver. Let me strive a little harder To be all that I should be; Let me be a little meeker To a brother who is weaker, Let me think more of my neighbor And a little less of me. The human mind is not an automatic device. It will not take care of itself. Will power, originality, imagination, courage –these things are not gifts but results. Every one of these qualities can be developed by effort, just as muscles can be developed by exercise. –Ex THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Printed by Herald Publishing Co. Entered at the Cookeville Post Office. Second class rate pending. STAFF: Bryce D. Stone ’26 Editor-in-Chief Eleanor Haile ’27 Asst. Ed-in-Chief Associate Editors: Dewitt T> Puckett ’25 Wit and Humor Shelia ’29 Social Amy Shipley ’28 Class Hallie Ray ’25 Faculty John J. Bell ’26 Exchange Hendon Johnston ’26 Athletic Thos. L. Passons English Alex Shipley Poet Business Department: James D. Miller ’27 Business Manager Jack Morrison ’26 Assistant Subscription rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY CLEAN ATHLETICS The tocsins has been sounded! The call to arms has been resounded to every portal. In every field of human activity, from the most obscure to the most popular, great improvements have been wrought. There is no field in which an upward trend is more noticeable, and deservedly so, than in the field of athletics. Athletics is no longer regarded as a thing for diversion only. Athletics is, in some form or other, as old as civilizations, indulged in some form of strenuous exercise in order to keep fit. The warriors were compelled to spend the major part of their time, while not engaged in actual combat, indulging in some form of athletics. Athletic activity may be divided into various classes, however, we are interested primarily in athletics in college, hence the discussion. Every up-to-date college is interested in the threefold developments of its students. Today the problem is physical development is coming into its true light and as it is coming to be vital part of the college activity it must be given due consideration. The day for commercialized athletics is past. The day of brute force minus the other prerequisites is gone. We are living in an age wherein an individual, in order to be a successful athlete, must possess many qualifications. Advancement in these lines has elevated the popular conception of athletics. The college athlete of today must present himself acceptable unto all, or else make himself an object of ridicule and scorn. He must be a man, or she a lady, in every sense of the word. Clean living in every respect, not only during the season, but at all times is fundamental. Any individual should be truly thankful if he is so fortunate as to be endowed with a strong body and an adequate amount of native intelligence. If such a person exists and does not develop these abilities to their maximum he becomes a social slacker and is not deserving of popular esteem. The athlete who resorts to unfair tactics in an athletic contest is unworthy to wear his college colors. He is not only defaming himself but is laying his college liable for criticism that may prove fatal. Then, as an athlete, as a fan, as a faculty member, and as a friend to all concerned, do your duty to eliminate all influences that hint at unfairness. OUR EDUCATIONAL FAULTS What is there about the name of “Shaw” that makes it a surety of wit and wisdom? It is not George Bernard, but Professor Charles Gray Shaw head of the department of philosophy at New York University, who has given expression to views that make us sit up and take notice. Other men have deplored the absence of culture in the modern industrial world –particularly in this land of the free and home of the brave –but few have pointed a finger at once so diagnostic and so humorous at that sore spot as Dr. Shaw employs. “Time was,” says he, “when the shiek of education sat in the tent of culture and let the camel of utility put his cold nose under the canvas. Now, the whole canvas is full of camels, while the tent itself is straining at the guy ropes. Industry has banished intellect; efficiency has expelled enlightenment; speed has run ahead of grace, and wealth has robbed dignity of its luster.” Thus the New York pedagogue held forth before the opening session of the summer school of his institution; and everything that he said was right. He spoke nothing but the plain truth, even when he gave his satiric gift full rein and suggested that to make the curriculum of the average American university complete there should be an advanced course in bowling alley management and seminary in pretzel designing. There was great rejoicing among the educators of the country when, immediately after the armistice, an increased hunger for education among American youth become apparent. Now, however, it is apparent that what Dr. Shaw says is true. We are all for efficiency rather than enlightenment, and for speed rather than grace. Dr. Shaw has said something that all our educators must know to be the truth and it is something they must take account of if our universities are to continue to be institutions of higher learning, and therefore of culture, instead of mere business schools. –Philadelphia Record. THE LIBRARY The Tech Library is now being remodeled and will soon have ample facilities for accommodating the large number of students who are now forced to crowd into it because of the lack of a study hall. The new room which is being connected with the library will be used as a stock room and, in addition to the places for the regular stocks, will contain special shelves for reference books and specially built racks for current magazines. Old magazines will be places on file in another part of the room. New tables are to be built for the reading room; electric lamps will be placed on these tables for use on dark days; and tan shades will be placed over the windows to keep out the glare of the sun. in fact, every effort is being made to improve the arrangement of the library and make it of greater service to the student body. Only a few books have been added this year, due to the fact that, at present, there is no state appropriation for books. However, we hope that soon an ample sum will be set aside for this purpose; and books supplied to meet our ever increasing needs. MUSIC The chapel hour which is devoted to music proving very popular indeed. Continuing the study of the folk song. Wednesday, Dec. 3, was devoted to Negro spirituals. These express the true character of negro music much better than do “Old Black Joe,” “MY Old Kentucky Home,” or “Old Folks at Home,” for they are sung by the negro himself. A trio composed of Dan Jarvis soprano; Emily Stanton, alto, and Merrill Hughes, baritone, gave “Traveling to the Grave.” The song “Deep River” as written by Taylor, one of the leading negro composers, was sung by Mr. Hughes. The quartet, which is a favorite form with the negro, was represented effectively when the Boys’ Quartet, composed of Messrs, Puckett, Hughes, Puckett and Cantrell, sang the old favorite, “Shout All Over God’s Heaven.” They responded to an encore with the more recent version “All God’s Children Got a Ford.” You can not judge of a tree by its bark. True delicacy, that most beautiful heart-leaf of humanity, exhibits itself most significantly in little things. WHY? Does Mr. Barnes always ask the question you don’t know? Does Christmas always come when a fellow’s broke? Don’t you ever have a blowout near a garage? Do toastmasters always “butt in” when you stop speaking to get your breath? Do they allow teachers to own radios? Does the bus break down when you have a sweetie waiting for you at home? ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION Mr. Passons, treasurer of the Athletic Council, makes the following statement in regard to the financial condition of the Athletic Association: Cash on hand at beginning of season $334.14 Cash received (students’ fees, receipts and guarantees) 1395.41 Total 1729.55 Cash paid out (expense) 1446.87 Cash in bank 282.68 Bills payable 216.00 Balance when bills are paid 66.68 JOKES Eddie Watson: “You seem to think me a perfect idiot.” Robley Jobe: “No, no one is perfect.” When the frost is on the pumpkin, there’s dyspepsia in the pie. “Buff” LeFevre: “Do you think kissing is a sin?” Lucile Lee (coyly): “Well, it may be one of the sins of omission.” Mr. Passons: “Who was it saw the handwriting on the wall?” Ross: “President Smith.” Fred: “this match won’t light.” David: “Washa madda with it?” Fred: “I dunno—it lit all right a minute ago.” No girl marries a man for better or worse. She marries him for more or less. People who love in glass houses should have stained glass –White Mule When a woman reckons her age, 18 plus 2 equals 17. Tomassa: What will you do if I kiss you? Tomassina: I’ll bite! What kind of girl is Willia? Well, she reminds one of a clinging vine running around looking for something to cling to. SENIOR HIGH The Senior High School class met Wednesday, December 3rd, to select the class pins. Most of the class are confident of their ability to meet the requirements for graduation and we expect to have one of the largest graduating classes in the history of the school. The business of the class is being conducted in a very efficient manner. All dues and assessments have been paid, and the meetings are conducted in an orderly manner. The Senior High class was represented in football by Starnes, Massa, Keene, Robbins, Bynum, and Blount Starnes, Bynum, and Blount played regularly and made good records. Our class will also be represented in basketball by players on both the boys’ and girls’ teams. ACHIEVING SUCCESS He has achieved success who has lived well, laughed often and loved much; Who has gained the respect of intelligent men and the love of little children; Who has filled his niche and accomplished his task; Who has left the world better than he found it, whether by an improved poppy, a perfect poem or a rescued soul; Who has never lacked appreciation of earth’s beauty or failed to express it; Who has looked for the best in others and given the best he had; Whose life was an inspiration; Whose memory is a benediction. --Selected. All the trouble in the world comes from three things: Love, money and pet dogs. A hen can set and earn a living but men can’t. What are the men? The horses, running in a circle for corn and a place to sleep. What are the women? The jockeyes who drive the men, dress in silk, get the purse and spend the money. What’s a hair bob? Common sense and comfort. Let the women alone. Remember Solomon, the wise man, had whiskers. Where are yours? What’s humor? It’s cream and sugar that makes the coffee of life more palatable.

1924-12-15

 THE TECH ORACLE BUY YOUR ANNUAL NOW Campaign for Subscriptions Will Close February 12th Tech students are about sold on the proposition of publishing an Annual this year. Up to Wednesday evening, February 3, 125 had subscribed and paid for one or more copies of the book. Subscriptions will not be solicited after February 12 so those who wish to be sure of obtaining a copy should get in their order at once. SYNOPSIS OF “TWELFTH NIGHT” Act I In a shipwreck the twins, Sebastian and Viola, are separated. Viola is cast upon the coast of Illyria where, in boy’s attire, she becomes page to the Duke of Orsino. He sends her to Olivia, a wealthy lady, with whom he is in love, to urge his suit. Olivia caring little for the duke, falls in love with the page. ACT II Olivia’s actions and favors show Viola plainly that she is in love with her, while Viola, in turn, is obliged to hide her growing love for Orsino. Maria, Olivia’s maid, plots with the comic characters. Sir Toby Belch, Olivia’s uncle and Sir Andrew Agueecheek, to deliver to the haughty and arrogant steward. Malvolio, a veiled love letter which he shall think comes from Olivia, and which shall involved him in absurdities. ACT III Malvolio, reading what he thinks is a declaration of love from Olivia, follows the ridiculous directions in the letter, which include such items as wearing crossed yellow garters, so literally that Olivia, thinking him mad, has him confined. Olivia’s attentions to Viola are so marked that they are becoming embarrassing to the distinguished page. Sir Andrew is persuaded to challenge Viola to a duel, which though both of them are afraid of a sword, they are forced to begin. The entrance of officers with a prisoner halts the fight. This prisoner is Antonio, a sea captain, who has made his way with Sebastian to Illyria. ACT IV Sebastian, who is taken from Viola, continues to fight in man fashion, and routs the frightened Sir Andrew. Olivia meets Sebastian, takes him for his sister, and to his surprise urges him to an immediate marriage. Though he has never seen her before, Sebastian is delighted at her favor and goes off with her to a secret marriage () ACT V Olivia, meeting Viola, with the duke, calls the page “husband” Viola in great distress protests against this, and while she is trying to explain matters to the duke. Sebastian arrives, is rejoices to recognize in the page his siter, whom he had thought drowned. Mutual explanations follow, and the duke, finding that his beloved page is a woman, discovers that his former affections for his servant turns to love. Malvolio’s unfortunate predicament is explained and he is released. “EAGLES” SHOW IMPROVEMENT Both Squads Show Better Teamworks In Recent Games VARSITY IN WIN COLUMN Showing a decided change in form to that displayed in the Bowling Green Business University game of the preceding week, the Tech quint of “Golden Eagles” on Saturday, Jan. 23, decisively defeated the East Nashville “Y” team 23 to 12. Our passing and team-work was vastly improved and quite superior to that generally shown by the “Y”, who after the first quarter of brilliant playing, gradually subsided. Add to this our much heavier team and we get, as a result, the decisiveness. But for wretched luck o “crips” the score would have been much larger. However, we are compelled to say that the “Y” had the cleanest playing and most sportsmanlike team ever seen on the local court. They played basket ball and played it well, but seemingly because of lack of practice, were unable to stand the killing pace they set at the beginning of the game. For there was a basketball game without a star performer or an individual high scorer. The team worked as one man which is certainly to be commended. Keep it up. Tech Line Up Y.M.C.A. Jobe (4) R.F. (2) Gibbs Moss (2) L.F. (4) Wills Watson (5) R.G. (3) Jordan Davis L.G. (2) Montgomry Substitutions: Tech: Lewis (4) for Winningham; M.L Robbins (4) for Lewis: Lewis for Jobe for Moss; Winningham for Lewis; Moss for Robbins. Y.M.C.A.: McEwan for Willis: Wills for Montgomery; Montgomery for Anderson. Referee: Houtchens (Tulanue). Timer: Smith. Scorer: Robbins. CUMBERLAND DEFATS VARSITY On Wednesday, Jan. 27, in what was termed “the fastest and hardest fought game of the season,” Cumberland defeated the Tech varsity basketeers 28 to 26 –at Lebanon. Coach Overall said our bunch improved fifty per cent over their performance with the East Nashville “Y” and should have won but for a few minor calamities; all of which spells defats for Cumberland in the return game of the near future () Elam was high scorer for Cumberland with 13 points. Moss, for Tech, was next with 11. Tech Line-Up Cumberland Jobe (5) R.F. (1) McClain Winningham (2) R.F. (13) Elam Moss (11) C (6) Robinson Watson (5) R.G. (5) Felbaum Davis L.G. (1) Macey Substitutions: Tech: Robbins (3) for Winningham; Lewis for Ribbins; Winningham for Watson. Cumberland: Seller (1) for McClain; Camp for Elam; Peters for Macey CO-EDS DEFEAT “Y” Those basket ball fans and other wise of Tech and Cookeville who missed the Co-ed game, between Tech and Nashville Y.W.C.A. curtained missed a treat. It was one of those rare occasions when an entire team was “right” and going “big.” This revamped and rebuilt bunch of humanity, whom nobody except the coach and themselves gave even an outsider’s chance to win, were hitting on “all live” from the beginning to the end. Their type of play was as daring as it was astonishing. It was simply that of playing at top speed and then taking time out for part of it was, that after the game started, no more were needed the remainder of the game. The second wind must have stuck. The “Y” had a good fast team, but seemingly couldn’t get started. They had previously beaten all comers with the exception of the strong team from M.T.T.C. If Miss Whitson’s play continues to be of the calibre shown in this game, she will undoubtedly be ranked the best in the state. Anybody who can frequently take the ball off both backboards, get the cage six field goals, and shoot five out of eight fouls, must necessarily be good. And we see no good reason why it can’t be kept up. Here’s hoping anyhow. The playing and scoring ability of Miss Shanks was also greatly improved. She added seven points to the evening totals Miss McKeel, substituting for Miss Shipley, worked the floor in great style and is going to fit well in the system which Miss McClanahan is trying to install. Nothing in particular need be said for the guard –the deficiency of the “Y” score is replete with significance –to their credit. The score was Tech 26; Y.W.C.A. 12 Tech Line-Up Y.W.C.A. Shanks (7) R.F. (6) Verchota McKeel (2) L.F. Barber L. Whitson (17) C (2) Hilliard Starmes R.G. Gupton Moore L.G. bayley Substitutions: tech: A.P. Whitson for Moore. Y.W.C.A. Jarredd (2) for Barber; Bayley for Hilliard for Bayley; Harrison (2) for Hilliard; Hendricks for Bayley. Referee: Wilhite (Transylvania) Timer: Clark (Tech). Scorer: Robbins. STUDENTS VOTE FOR TOURNAMENT Date, March 4th, 5th and 6th During the past two years, Tech has conducted two basket ball tournaments, both of which have been considered successful from almost every viewpoint. Recently, the school administration was in doubt concerning the advisability of continuing the tournament as an annual function. The question was referred to the student body, individually and collectively. The students responded by voting overwhelming in favor of the tournament. Plans have been made which will enable those in charge of arrangements to place the visiting teams in the two boys dormitories, without making it necessary for their rooms as was done last year. This tournament will bring to T.P.I. and Cookeville more than one hundred young men, of high school grade, who will compose the teams who participate. Other visitors will be here at the same time and T.P.I. is playing host to all. If you are at all interested in Tech, then you should be interested in the entertainment of these visitors and players. It is your duty to extend them every kindness and courtesy while they are here. Be prepared to do your park. COLLEGE STUDENTS MAY OBTAIN PRIZE Atlanta, Ga, Jan. 22 –The Commission on Interracial Cooperation, with headquarters in this city, announces the offer of three prizes of $75, $50, and $25 each, for the three best papers on race relations submitted by students of southern white colleges during the present school year. The announcement says: “Contestants will be free to choose any phase of the subject though preference will be given to practical discussions of conditions in the South, with suggestions for their improvement. Papers should not exceed 2500 wods in length and must be in the hands of the Commission on or before May 15. The contest is open to all college students in the thirteen Southern states, including Kentucky and Oklahoma and is for the purpose of encouraging study and discussion of race relations. Full information as to the contest, together with a reading list, will be supplied by the Commission to anyone interested.” Commission on Interracial Cooperation, 409 Palmer Building, Atlanta, Ga. Nearly every man believes in heredity until his son flunks in college. WHO SHOULD CHOOSE ENGINEERING AS A LIFE’S WORK By Jack Morrison ‘26 “It is better to choose a vocation than merely to hunt a job” –Frank Parsons. In choosing a vocation, there are two main considerations –the personal qualifications of the worker, and the requirements of the occupations. The following are thoughts taken from different authors concerning engineering. Engineering is concerned with a very broad and varied field which has been divided and subdivided into almost one hundred classifications, but the most important divisions are probably those of civil mechanical, electrical, chemical and mining engineering. Each of these fields lends itself to further subdivision according to special work which might be done in it. Civil engineering deals chiefly with the problems deals chiefly with the problems of design and the construction of such works as railroads, waterways, highways, harbors and municipal works for the control of water supply, irrigation systems and sanitation. The work of the civil engineer is most often concerned with overcoming or adopting natural forces to the needs of man. He builds roads over formerly inaccessible places, spans rivers with bridges, connects us by railroads with distant regions, dams great bodies of water to prevent floods, tunnels through mountains and constructs pipe lines which bring to cities their necessary water supply. His work consists of the designing of these various works, and of supervising the carrying out of the plans, so that the completed structures shall be entirely safe and constructed as economically as possible. The mechanical engineer is a designer, constructor and inventor of machinery. He may be engaged in any kind of work from the design of tools to the construction of huge steam or hydraulic plants. Much of the work of the mechanical engineer is experimentation to improve upon former inventions. Some of the most important work of mechanical engineers is being done in the field of transportation facilities. Motors of various type for automobiles, aeroplanes, steamships and locomotives are being constantly worked upon and improved. The field of electrical engineering is an immense and practically unexplored one. In spite of all the new uses to which electrical energy has, in the past twenty-five years been put, we know that electrical engineering is as yet a comparatively undeveloped factor in modern industry. Many electrical engineers engage in the design and manufacture of electrical apparatus and others devote themselves to installing and utilizing this apparatus in lighting, heating and power plants, and in the fields of telegraphy and telephony. The chemical engineer is daily coming into greater –prominence, for at present there are more synthetic products in use than ever before. It is through his work in the laboratory that these products are made possible. Besides’ discovering new synthetic processes, it is his work, also, to design the proper machinery for carrying these processes to completion. For in manufacturing synthetic products of any kind, it is necessary to have special apparatus, composed of materials which will not be affected by the chemicals used. The chemical engineer is the man who has sufficient knowledge of both chemistry and engineering to design and construct such apparatus, and to install it in suitable places. The mining engineer makes possible the utilization of the mineral resources of a country. His work deals with the scientific and technical problems of mining –the testing of the soil for mineral deposits, the opening of mines and their proper equipment, and finally, the supervision of actual mining operations. Many boys think that, if they like to play with machinery, they have the necessary qualifications of an engineer. But there are a great many qualifications much more necessary than this. The first thing the engineer should have is imagination. Without imagination, there could be no invention. The engineer must be able to visualize a thing before it exists. He must be able to see, with his mind’s eye, each completed stage of whatever he is designing or constructing, long before that stage has been reached. The engineer has need also of a capacity for sound judgement, for in work such as he does, which affects so many people, and costs so much in money and in effort, poor judgement may result in great loss, and perhaps in disaster. He must be able to think with scientific precision, basing his conclusion upon definite information. There is no room in engineering for vague generalities or guess work. Very important also is a creative instinct. The engineer must be a man who loves to work things out, to plan and develop new and original ideas. With this should go ingenuity, the power to make the most out of little, and to adopt oneself to all circumstances. The engineer should be resourceful and a quick thinker. He should be able to handle men. The young man who wishes to study engineering should be fond of and proficient in mathematics and science, for engineering is built largely upon higher mathematics and physics. Good health and strength are also desirable, and in some phases of engineering absolutely essential. Briefly, the engineer is the all round person. Especially noteworthy is the close relation between engineering, invention, and business. The result is that for certain sorts of business and these among the most important, an engineering training is among the best of preparations. Conversely, the engineer who does not quite make a success of his profession can easily try again as a business man. The advantages and disadvantages of engineering as a profession are many. Unfortunately, “the cream rises thin at the top,” so that the great engineers of the world are a small group of men, who have something of a monopoly of large scale undertakings. But the unique thing about engineering is the combination within its ranks of great prizes for great men and a comfortable living for lesser men. THE NATIONAL FEDERATION OF AMERICAN STUDENTS By Lewis Fox, Princeton ’26 President In nearly every college is heard youth’s demand for expansion. The undergraduate protests against artificial conventions; educational, social, political. His range of vision has transcended the petty fields of local college dispute and has included the entire student body of the nation. Beneath the veneer of cynicism, criticism and revolt exists a positive desire for achievement. The Conference of two hundred and fifty colleges from forty states meeting at Princeton, New Jersey December eleventh and twelfth, expressed this demand for action by the formation of a National Federation of American students. This organization purposes, first, to secure an increased interest and influences upon national and international affairs in the colleges and universities of this country; second, to achieve a closer unity between the colleges of the United States and to promote sympathy and understanding between the sympathy and understanding between the students of this country and those of the rest of the world. One of the predominating characteristics of student life today is the desire to reach beyond bonds of section, class or creed and to unite as students. The undergraduates have become impatient of the old prejudices and conventions of the Victorian period. There has growth an increased realization of the value of student opinion from all sections of the country. Each has its peculiar problem, but the ideas and aims common to all transcend each local question. It is the aim of the Federation to marshal the opinions of the nation’s student body and focus them on the following specific objectives. 1. The establishment of scholarships between the colleges of American and Europa similar to the Rhodes and Davison now in operation. These scholarships would be for the duration of one year and would be held by Juniors who could return to their own college after their term abroad. Plans are being made whereby cooperation can be achieved between the various colleges and organizations such as the international institute of education and Rockefeller foundation. In this first-hand knowledge of European conditions and will bring back to their colleges the mature thought and observation acquired from their year in a European conditions and will bring back to their colleges the mature thought and observation acquired from this year in a European university. Along the same lines it is hoped to exchange students between Eastern and Western universities. This will give both sections an idea of the thoughts and problems of another part of the country. Unfortunately, at the present time the main source of contact between different universities is one acquired in athletic contests or dances. While these are excellent in themselves, there must be a more permanently and regular meeting of minds. These exchange scholarships purpose the achievement of this end. 2. Student tours to Europe during the summer are planned. The men and women on the trips would study the social, political, and economic conditions of Europe and would attend a short course at some European university. The international Confederation of students is planning to send three hundred American students abroad during the summer in parties of eight and ten apiece. They will join with two or three European students abroad and investigate conditions in the various countries. Full details regarding these tours are being studies and will be submitted to the various colleges in about six or eight weeks. 3. The Federation will prove a central house for all information regarding student conditions I Europe and information on fellowships in the United States and in foreign countries. There are many interesting movements in European life of which all of us are totally ignorant. It is our aim to acquire information regarding the student activities in order that we may judge more intelligently concerning international problems. 4. Co-operation between the faculty and undergraduates in American colleges on matters relating to courses of study, student government and the administration of discipline. Fundamentally, there is no antagonism between teacher and student. We must share together to achieve the best education. It is the desire of the federation to promote cooperation through Student Councils, student representation on committees arranging the curriculum and in other ways that may prove feasible. The so-called revolt of youth is nothing more than a desire to share with the faculty the responsibilities and privileges of educational administration. We must sit down and reason together. The maturity of the teacher and the zeal of the student together will aid the power and influence of the American college. 5. The creation of public opinion to militate against commercialism in college athletics. The average undergraduate body has a sensible attitude towards football and other sports. We must unite and consort together lest the alumni and newspaper misinterpret our attitude. Such matters as regulation of intersectional contests, eligibility rules, length of schedules and prohibitions against the athletic tramp are questions of common concern and must be dealt with by the students themselves. 6. The establishment of a central bureau whose purpose will be to furnish colleges the prominent speakers on national and international problems. The conference at Princeton heard men outstanding in their fields. The leading lawyers, business men and statesmen at different times throughout the year. The Oxford and Cambridge Unions listen to Prime Ministers and other leaders of Parliament there is no reason why the American student can’t do likewise. 7. The encouragement of a spirit of individual initiative as opposed to the prevalent tendency toward standardized mediocrity. A man’s clothes social position and ancestors should not determine his standing in college. There must be a more durable recognition of worth. We agree with Herbert Hoover that demanding that a man’s sole qualification for leadership should be his personal ability and character. Under this topic, there are many problems such as the place of fraternities in college life, means of working one’s way through college, etc. The federation is divided into seven geographical divisions, each being represented by two members of the Executive Committee. Each representative will have under him the colleges of his district from which some person of organization will be picked or elected to handle the work of the Federation in his own college. The committee members will also furnish the college papers information of student activities here and abroad. There will be regional conferences to discuss matters of sectional importance; the first of these will probably be held in April. The success of the Federation depends upon the support given by each individual college. It can be no bureaucratic organization. On each campus, there must be a group of men and women interested in the success and purposes of the Federation. Every college in the country is ipso facto a member of the National Federation of American Students. Ever since 1917, the American students have desired to take a stand against the recurrence of the war. The Federation of American Students is a definite attempt to unite the undergraduates of the nation in an effective body that will militate against the prejudices and misunderstandings of Jingoistic patriots, and will promote tolerance and sympathy between the students of America and the rest of the world. As first president of the Federation. I would summon the undergraduates of the nation to the attainment of these ends. In a spirit of humility and consecration we must enter upon this new era in our educational life. The Federation has much to learn and many things to change but with the cooperation and support of every college and every student the undergraduates of America will attain recognition and will prove an effective and beneficial force in the education and political affairs of the United States. –The New Student WHY MEN FAIL “there is a cause for everything” Nothing ever “just happens” If a man is promoted to a better job, there is a cause. if a man loses his job there is also a cause. There are many causes that lead to failure. There is a list of the most common causes. Finding fault with the other fellow, but never seeing your own. Doing as little as possible trying to get as much as possible for it. Spending too much time showing up the other fellow’s weak points and too little time correcting your own. Slandering those we do not like as Procrastination –putting off until tomorrow something we should have done day before yesterday. Deceit –talking friendly to the him in the back as soon as he turns around. False beliefs that we are smart enough to reap a harvest of pay before sowing a crop of honest service. Disloyalty to those who have rusted us. Egotism –the belief that we know it all and no one can teach us anything. Last, but not least, lack of necessary training and education to enable us to stand at the head in our line of work. Look this list over and check yourself up by it. if none of these causes for apply to you, then you are to be congratulated, because you are a success. Bridge: another game where you hold hands THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute Printed by The Herald Publishing Co. Entered as Second Class matter at the Cookeville Postoffice, Cookeville, Tenn. EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief Bryce D. Stone ‘26 Assistant Editor Edward McKay ‘27 Assistant Editor Nola Quarles ‘27 ASSOCIATE EDITORS Athletics M. Douglas Robbins ‘27 Wit and Humor Robert Cox ‘30 Exchange Elizabeth Ensor ‘28 Glasses Martha Sedivak ‘27 Society Shelia Officer ‘29 Alumni Hazel Wall ‘27 Literary Mary Crenshaw ‘27 Faculty Advisor Thos. L. Passons BUSINESS Business Manager Lee S. Darwin ‘27 Assistant Bus. Mgr J. Fred Terry ‘27 CIRCULATION Circulation Manager J.D. Miller ‘27 Asst. Cir. Manager Robt. Smith ‘27 Asst. Cir. Manager David Terry ‘29 Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI MONTHLY EDUCATION The aim of education should be to teach us rather than to think than what to think –rather to improve our minds, so as to enable us to think for ourselves, than to load the memory with the thoughts of other men. –Beattie. If you suffer your people to be ill educated, and their manner to be corrupted from their infancy, and then punish them for those crimes to which their first educational disposed them –you first make thieves and then punish them. –Sir Thomas Moore. A college education shows a man how little other people know. –Haliburton. Education is the apprenticeship of life. –Wilmott. Love is the greatest of education. –Mrs. Osgood. The real object of education is to give children resources that will endure as long as life endures; habits that time will ameliorate, not destroy; occupation that will render sickness tolerable, solitude pleasant, age venerable, life store dignified and useful, and death less terrible. –Sydney Smith JOKES Most women hope for joy in the sweet buy and buy. There was a young man from White’s bend, Who planned a wedding to attend; But while he was moping, His bride (to-be) was eloping And now he’s come to a sad end. EXCHANGES Worth remembering You can’t make a real success without making real enemies. You can’t hold a strong position without strong opposition. You can’t seem right to any if you don’t seem wrong to many. A useful life can’t be entirely peaceful and carefree. You must do your duty as you see it. Every earnest man in every generation has paid the price of individuality. You can’t dodge. In every sphere men give and sneer –even the peace of the ditch-digger is threatened by the unemployed laborer who covets his job. So long as you aspire, others will conspire –so long as you try, others will vie. –the blue and gray. Bu$in$$ Manager$ $ong How dear to my heart I$ the cash of $ub$cripter$ When the generous$ $ub$criber$ Pre$ent it to view; Of the one who $ub$cribe$ not I refrain $ub$crib$ not I refrain from de$cription, For perhap$, gentle reader That one may be –you! --The Huntingtonian. Some students wash their faces While standing at the sink, But more wash at the fountain When they go to get a drink. --Highland Echo. A gum chewing girl And a cud chewing cow— There is some difference, You must allow. What is the difference? I have it now— It’s the thoughtful expression On the face of the cow. --Exchange What A College Stands For “To be at home in all lands and ages; to count nature a familiar acquaintance and art an intimate friend; to gain a standard for the appreciation of other men’s work and the criticism of your own; to carry the keys of the world’s library in your pocket, and feel its resources behind you in whatever task you undertake; to make hosts of friends among the men of your own age who are to be yourself in generous enthusiasms and cooperate with others for common ends; to learn manners from students who are gentlemen and form character under professors who are Christians –this is the offer of the college for the best four years of your life. –Bethany Collegian. Editor’s Secret of Success A Texas editor has just retired with $50,000 in the bank. Someone asked him how he did it. “I attribute my ability to quit with a $50,000 bank account after thirty years’ work,” he said, “to close application to duty, always hewing to the mark and letting the chips fall where they may, the most rigorous rules of economy, never spending a cent foolishly, everlastingly keeping at my job with a whole heart –and the death of an uncle who left me $49,999.50.” –Exchange Deep malice makes too deep incision. –Shakespeare. Wear A Smile Like a house without a dooryard, Like a yard without a flower; Like a clock without a mainspring, That will never tell the hour. A thing that sort o’ makes you feel A hunger all the while— Oh, the saddest thing there ever was Is the face without a smile Right Back At Him An opulent-looking man drove up to the curb in a car that was not so opulent and was accosted by a small boy. “Watch yer auto fer a nickle, mister.” “Beat it, kid, this machine won’t run away.” “Naw, but I could tell you when it starts to fall to pieces.” –Exchange Fishy “The other day I went fishing and caught one of those great big fish –let’s see, what is you call them? “Oh, you mean a whale?” “No, that couldn’t have been it; I was using whales as bait.” Help Wanted “This is my car,” exploded the irate tourist to the garage man, “and what I say about it goes –see?” Just then a dirty faced machinist crawled out from under the dead machine and said, “Say, ‘Engine,’ mister.” Just so A man asked for a pullman berth, and was told there was a difference of 50 cents between an upper berth and a lower berth. The conductor pointed out: “The lower is higher than the upper. The higher price is for the lower, if you want it lower you’ll have to go higher. We sell the upper lower than the lower. Most people don’t like the upper, although it is lower on account of being higher. When you occupy an upper you have to get up to go to bed and get down to get up.” TO A FRIEND If nothing else in all the world Remained, but just a glimpse of you I’d still believe the world was good And life worth living, too. If every friend had proven false But you, I’d still have faith to know That God could raise up other friends To stand by me in weal or woe. If over all the world a cloud Had settled deeper than the night, And I should see your smile, I’d know Somewhere, sometime, there would be light. If every bird that ever sang Had lost the note it sang before, One word of yours would make me feel That music would peal forth once more. If every lovely flower that grew Had perished in a world of pain, I’d trust the power that made you, dear, To bring back loveliness again. If no one else believed in God, And no one else believed in me, Your joy in life, your faith, your love, Would make me feel eternity. --Brooklyn Eagle. Patronize Tech Oracle Advertisers. UPPER CUMBERLANDS AND PALLADIANS The old Maid’s and Bachelor’s Convention convened last Monday in the joint meeting of the Upper Cumberland and Palladian Literary Societies. Interesting subjects were discussed, first by old maids, then old bachelors. The old maids were represented in costume by: Amy Shipley –“Why I am an Old Maid.” Elizabeth Foster –“How to Manage a Husband.” Martha Sedivak –“How to rear Children.” This closed the discussion for Old Maids. Then the Bachelors took the platform in the person of: Chars Davis –“Origin of an Old Bachelor.” Douglas Robbins –What a woman means to me Sewell Brown –“Art of Rearing Children.” The hearty laughs produced heat which was cooled off by the Eskimo Pie served after the program. BELLES LETTRES LITERARY SOCIETY The Belles Lettres Literary Society met in their regular meeting room on Jan. 18th. A motion was carried that we dispense with the program for every other meeting, using this as a business meeting. The committees met to discuss plans for the Valentine party. The Belles Lettres Literary Society met in their regular meeting room on Jan. 25th and rendered the following program. Devotional Chaplain Reading Vallie Huddleston Poem Beulah Clark Pen Picture Juanita Montgomery Jokes Lucile Lee Reading Wilma Atnip The following new members were sworn in: Elizabeth Rogers Christine Settle, Ethel Anderson and Lucy Pryce Mitchell NEW NOTES The tech glee club sang in chapel on Wednesday, Jan. 20th. One selection was given, “Fiddle and I.” Benton Cantrell ’25 was a recent visitor on the campus. Benton Carr, who has been teaching in Overton county, has returned to Tech, entering the sophomore college class. The picture, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” sponsored by the Y.W.C.A. and the Y.M.C.A. was shown Friday evening, Jan. 22. This was a splendid picture and only one of the good pictures that has been, and will be here this year. A feature of much interest at this show was a slide introduction “Mr. Barnes’ Hair Tonic.” Which no doubt will prove wonderful. You are missing things of much interest when you fail to see these shows. Contributor—I have an original joke here which I— Editor –My dear man, you don’t look that old. SHERWOOD LITERARY SOCIETY The Sherwood literary society is doing very efficient work under the administration of the officers for this term who are: Luke Medley President W.E. Gentle Vice-President Robt. Rose Secretary Tim Huddleston Treasurer Armon Clark Chaplain C.W. Davis Critic Frank Loomis Atty. General Hugh Dowell Sgt.-at-arms Bryce D. Stone Historian Everyone is interested in the work of the society and all are anxious to take part in it. Representatives for the annual inter-society debate have been selected and tryout for the Orators and Declaimers will be held at an early date. The annual Valentine party will be held on Saturday, February 13th. WHAT THE ALUMNI THINK OF US We are printing a letter from a Tech Alumni, in which he comments at length upon the work of our paper. Constructive criticism is always welcome, whether favorable or unfavorable. We should be glad to receive the opinions of other Alumni on the Oracle. –editor. Mr. Bryce D. Stone Editor-in-Chief The Tech Oracle, Cookeville, Tenn. Cookeville, Tenn. Dear Mr. Stone; It is a genuine pleasure to see the progress that the Oracle is making toward perfection. And I am glad to take this opportunity and method of commending you, your staff, and the contributors, for the excellency of the issue of January 5, 1926. The whole “tone” of the paper seems to indicate the selection and apportionment of space given to the various subjects. As an illustration of this fact I will refer to various articles, touching upon various phases of college life. The section devoted to Athletics was sufficient, since it gave the line-up, the results of the game, a few pointed and constructive criticisms and such other information as is necessary for a complete report of a basketball game. It did not try to give such a report as would be expected in a daily newspaper that has more space to give to sports than you have in the entire paper. From this it is easily seen that it is not over-balanced with athletics. The news of the world outside the local campus such as “News from other colleges,” “World Court Wins Out in Poll,” and “New Rulings for College Athletics,” gives both students and Alumni an opportunity to compare their own school with those of other places. Thru the school publication these things can be emphasized more forcefully than they otherwise would be. Probably the articles contributed by individuals from the departments of Engineering, Literature and Music deserve the most praise. They are of good material and admirably compared. But best of all, they show that their authors are willing to do their best for the sake of the departments, thereby lending material assistance to the efforts of the school administration and the student body in making a better institution of their school. No better work could be done by a student than to write an article such as these of some department in which he is interested. I could not do you justice in failing to comment on the wholesome humor in the “Oracle.” I am very glad that the paper has never been lowered by the filthy humor that is prevalent among our sister colleges in the form of student publications. “News From Alumni” is always good. The editorials and paragraph insertions serve a good purpose in giving sound doctrine in regard to education. Even the advertisements are so arranged as to add neatness and dignity to the appearance of the “Oracle.” I am very proud of the fact that I can make such statements as these, and do I sincerely. Yours very truly, John M. frazier, ’22 ‘25 “How did you like the sermon” “I think it was perfectly lovely,” was the enthusiastic reply. “But there were so few of us that every time the arson said ‘dearly beloved’ I positively blushed.” The Sou’wester. To other’s faults I’ll gladly shut my eyes; Therein I think the joy of friendship lies.” –Guest. WHY GO TO COLLEGE The above question is an important one in the minds of high school students who are nearing graduation from high school and cannot immediately see the reward of their high school training. The statistics printed below should dispel any doubts along that line. And if high school training is justified when considered merely from a financial standpoint, then, what of college with it’s improved equipment, better teachers, finer associations, and immensely greater facilities for training men and women? Every day that you stay in school is worth $9.02 to you. Worth $9.02 over $45.00 a week, over $1,600.00 for each school year. Unless you can get a job that pays you $45.00 a week, right now— You’re losing money if you quit school. An educated laborer will earn, on average, $500 a year. If he works for 40 years, he has earned a total of $20,000. A high school graduate earns an average of $1,000 a year, just twice as much. So that in 40 years, he will earn $40,000. You stay in school about 2,160 days in order to graduate from high school. By doing so, you earn $20,000 more than if you didn’t. Divide the $20,000 by 2,160 you get $0.02 Each day in school means $9.02 more money earned in the end. Do you see how EXPENSIVE it is to quit school soon? The boy who stays out of school to earn less than nine dollars a day is losing money, not making money. (The above figures are taken from one of our exchanges.) –Editor College News Queens university, Canada, will debate a British team composed of the best orators of the Universities of Cambridge, Oxford, Dublin and Edinburgh. Lew Sarrett poet and professor at Northwestern University declares he is nauseated with modern life, it’s complexities, it’s super financially. He will leave for the woods of northern Wisconsin where he will live with nature. For one semester of the year he will teacher at Northwestern commuting each week end to his cabin 600 miles away. Baylor University is attempting to arrange a debate with the University of Sidney, Australia. The Sidney team will arrive in San Francisco on April 6, and will debate several American teams. Military training has abolished from Cleveland schools by the Cleveland Board of Education. Two football scholarships will be established at the University of California as provided by the will of the late Andrew L. Smith, who was head coach at that institution. $10,000 has been provided. The scholarships will go to men on the football squad. Harvard: All seniors in college who are in good standings have been granted unlimited cuts by the faculty. This regulation, which goes into effect after the mid year exams is in accord with Harvard’s program of a gradual extension of freedom. Hitherto this privilege has only been accorded a “Dean’s list” of exceptional students. University of Colorado: the lecture system, mass education and the evils of large classes have been discussed in editorials in the “Silver and Gold” and in the correspondence columns. The undergraduate paper deplores the common practice of asking of the student nothing but a knowledge of facts. Bowdoin: and undergraduate committee is cooperating with a faculty and an alumni committee in examining Bowdoin’s education system with a view to overhauling it. questionnaires on various college problems have been sent to students. Ohio State University: The university student publication is attempting to save “many a stubbed toe and stone bruise” along the path of learning by explaining at the beginning of the quarter just what several progressive instructors are trying to do in their classes. Professors at Tuffs college will be graded by their students. The student council has approved the idea and will set to work devising a suitable plan. The faculty will probably be marked for knowledge of their subject, ability to tech it, general intelligence, personal force and personality. A PROBLEM A young woman goes upstairs at 7:45 pm to dress for the evening. She is nineteen years old and weighs 102 pounds. State the wait of the young man down stairs. The latest radio hit is “Bedtime Stories for Collegians” broadcasted at six o’clock in the morning. JOKES Shelal –I’ve just come from the beauty parlor. Jobe – You didn’t get waited on did you? Doctor –You temperature is 103 degrees. C.W. Davis –Doc, is that in the shade? Aubrey –I see here in the paper that a man turned over in his sleep and it killed him Amy –impossible. Aubrey –No, he was driving at night, went to sleep and his car turned turtle. I understand that the gym will be equipped with wheel-barrows next year. Why is that? That’s to teach the incoming freshmen to walk on their hind legs. Jackson –Our halfback is about to kick off Letha Capps –How terrible, was he injured in the last game? “What’s the difference between an old bachelor and a married man?” “I don’t know.” “The old bachelor is not married.” We know a young man from Burns. A lad whom nothing concerns, his countenance is straight And his character’s first rate: He’s lover and heartbreaker by turns. Man proposes, woman exposes. –exchange. What’s a pessimist? Oh, he’s a fellow who can’t see the joke when it’s on him.

1926 May 20

 THE TECH ORACLE TECH STUDETNS FAVOR WORLD COURT Vote Taken Friday at Chapel Assembly The Tech student body voted on the World Court question at the regular Chapel assembly on Friday, December 4. About 65 per cent of the students voted on the question 92 per cent of those voting favored United States participation in the Court, while 8 per cent were opposed. Through the student Christian Associations the results of this voting will be forwarded to The New Student where the returns from colleges all over the nation will be tabulated. This consensus of student opinion will be laid before congress when it begins a discussion of the World Court, on December 17th. “TWELFTH NIGHT” As is announced elsewhere in this paper, the college department has chosen “Twelfth Night” for the annual presentation of Shakespearean drama. While the play will hardly be given before commencement, elaborate plans are already under way for the event. As an inducement to attendance from the surrounding towns, those coming from each town will be assigned a section of seats in the auditorium, especially decorated for their delegation. To all communities represented by ten or more people, a prize will be given and a special award will be made to the largest delegation. The above is but a small part of the plan which is to make of “Twelfth Night” the most phenomenal success of anything ever attempted by Tech students. Characters for the play are being selected now and real work will begin after the holidays are over. Messrs. McClanahan and Passons will direct the play. (A column in each succeeding issue of the Oracle will contain information relating to “Twelfth Night.” Read it. –Editor.) GLEE CLUBSIN CONCERT There are three Glee Clubs at T.P.I. this year –A girls’ Glee Club, a boys’ Glee Club, and a mixed chorus –all are working regularly each week. Girls’ Glee Club The Girls Glee Club started early with a good membership and has been doing good work. Those belongings to this club are: Mary Ellen Rash, jessie Barnes, Amy Shipley, Elsie Young, Beulah Clark, Muriel Gibson, Elise Gregory, Mary Ellen Shanks, Virginia Wilcox, Louise Wood, Emily Stanton, Agnes Greenwood, Thelma McCormick, Elizabeth Hargis, Lucille Cameron. Boys’ Glee Club The Boys’ Glee Club was organized later in the term. Some good voices are beginning to show up as the work progresses. This club boasts two members of the faculty, Mr. Hilliard and Mr. McClanahan. Mr. McClanahan, who has had a great deal of experience with glee from Calhoun: Davis, a guard from Shop Springs High. The others trying out are the two Stringfield brothers, and R. Robbins, guards; and Johnson, Snyder, M.L. () club is assisting Miss Stanton I the direction of the work. The following are members: Luther Puckett, Gradys Winningham, Mr. Hilliard, Mr. McClanahan, George Lewis, Otto Masters, Ray Baker, Thurston Tipps, Alvin Jackson, Armon Clark, Eugen Wood. Mixed Chorus The mixed chorus was formed by combining the Boys’ and Girls’ Glee Clubs. This organization will do some concert work during the year. Their first appearance will be at the City School auditorium Dec. 11. On a program under the auspices of the Cookeville Music Club. The Girls’ Glee Club will also appear on this program. Orchestra The School Orchestra will take on different timbre this year. There are stringed instruments to take the place of the wind instruments that we had last year. We lost several of our members of last year to other institutions but the new members are working hard to make this year’s orchestra the best one T.P.I. has ever had. The Personnel is as follows: Violins –Mr. Hillard, Kathleen Gibson, Agnes Greenwood, Mary Ellen Shanks. Guitar –Beulah Clark. Mandolin –Fred Tardy. Trumpet –Clem Allen Womack. Drums –Albert Brogden. Piano and Director –Miss Stanton. COLLEGE DEPARTMENT At a recent meeting of the United College Classes the following business was transacted. Mr. Davis Chairman of the committee for the selection of the Shakespearean play reported that the committee had decided upon “Twelfth Night.” This play is to be presented some time during the spring term by the College Department. It was suggested by Mr. Darwin that the balance of the money realizes on last year’s play be used for the floral tribute sent by the T-Club at the death of our schoolmate, Louis B. Lefevre. All the members were urged to be getting up enthusiasm for an Annual this year. We are attending a real school, let’s have all that goes with it. BASKETBAL SQUAD BEGINS PRACTICE Coaches Report Splendid Material for Team On Monday, Nov. 30th, varsity basketball practice was begun in earnest and about twenty men have been responding to the call each day since. Five letter men on last year’s team are here working out daily –Jobe, Watson, Poteet, Winningham and Carr –and Alcorn, a very efficient guard also of last year’s team, will arrive in a few weeks. The worth of these men are well known to Tech followers. Jobe, at center, was the equal of any man who opposed him in jumping. He can also play any position with as equal ease. Watson is a good shot. Poteet is a very fast forward and good at close shots. Winningham last year alternated at guard and center. He is capable of playing any position with equal ability. He is a good floor-working, fairly good at distance, and excellent on close-ups. Carr was a substitute on last year’s squad, but is showing up better this year and promises to give somebody a hard fight for a regular position. Cooper, captain of the team of 1923-24, and one of the best guards ever seen on the local court, is out and certain of a varsity berth. Moss, tall center on last year’s U.T. Freshmen team, promises to make one of the best centers Tech ever had. Outside of these two, who stand out above the lot, there are among the newcomers, Little speed, guard from Livingston academy.: Lewis, a fast but light forward, and Whittaker, forward. () from Calhound; Davis, a guard from Shop Springs High. The others trying out are the two Stringfield brothers and R. Robins. Guards: and Johnson, Snyder, M.L. Robbins and Burrows, forwards. Only eight games on the schedule have been definitely settled, but more are being arranged. Among the teams to be played this season are Cumberland, Bethel, Ogden, Carson-Newman, King College, East Tennessee Teacher’s College, Milligan, Cincinnati Surety Co., Bowling Green Business University, Western Kentucky Normally, and Middle Tennessee Teachers College. The complete schedule will be given in the next issue of the Oracle. CO-ED BASKETBALL For over a month the co-ed basketball squad of about thirty players have been going thru preliminary practice. The squad has now been cut to thirteen, the number that will be carried all seaso and is comprised of the following girls: Misses Shipley, Cassety, Annie Pearl Whitson, and Van Hooser, forwards. Of these girls, Miss Shipley, Cassety, Annie Pearl Whitson, and Van Hooser, forwards. Of these girls, Miss Shipley is the only one who has seen extensive service and is one of the best in the state. The guards are Misses Lucile Moore, McKrel, Cornwell, and Peters. Miss Moore and Miss McKeel received letters last year and are experienced players—Miss Moore being exceptionally good and Miss McKeel not far behind. The centers are Misses Lucy Whitson, Barnes, Starnes and Marguerite Moore Miss Whitson is by far the best of the lot and with good training should make one of the best in the state. The Co-ed schedule is also indefinite, but plans are being made for six games away and five at home. Among the teams to be played are Carson-Newman, E.T.T.C. Maryville. M.T.T.C., Cumberland Peabody and possibly Alabama Normal, where Miss Jobe is now coaching. PROFESSOR PEPP On Thursday evening, Dec. 17th, the much heralded visit of Professor Pepp to Cookeville will become a reality. Professor Pepp will appear at the city aschool auditorium of the above named date, in the person of one, J. Leslie Myers, who will be acocompanied by fifteen other enthusiastic Sherwoods and Belles Lettres, including in the cast. The nervous hysteria of Professor Pepp, the ludicrous absurdities of the Butterfly Buttonbuster, and the clownish antics of Sim Batty (C.W. Davis), the town constable show the prevailing mood of the play which is full of fun from beginning to end. Time—Three days in September. Place—A small College town. Time of Performance—Two Hours and Twenty minutes Admission—Adults 35c children 25c Doors Open—7 o’clock Play Begins—8 o’clock SOMETHING DIFFERENT Tech students seldom become bored with Chapel exercises. Fortunately this year we have been pleasantly entertained at Chapel by moving pictures, music, speeches, and interpretations of dances. It remained to Miss McClanahan’s physical education department to give us the most spicely different program of the season. On Nov. 26, at chapel a number of graceful and beautifully attired young damsels held intense attention of the student body for twenty whole minutes. We watched with great interest the almost forgotten dances so popular with other generations. The first dancer was that of the Irish Wash Woman, a hilariously funny dance involving a comical harmony of movements and a dizzy series of gyrations and oscillations. The three dances that follows were Skater’s Shattiche, Old Rustic, and the Sailor’s Hornpipe. These dances were much enjoyed, and the () student body called repeatedly for encores. Miss McClanahan and the girls who participated in the dances are to be congratulated upon the excellence of the program. The physical education classes can always be depended upon to give a different and amusing program. We are looking forward to being entertained by them at others times. NEWS FROM OTHER COLLEGES At Antioch College, the results of a study of the effects of smoking upon scholarship has been announced. The conclusions drawn were that, while there are no permanent effects of smoking upon blood pressure, lung capacity, or pulse rate, a definite relationship exists between smoking and low scholarship. Among the men students 31.8 per cent of non-smokers fail to maintain required grades, while 62.3 per cent of heavy smokers similarly fail. Inhalers fail most often. Of the 23 men dismissed from Antioch last year for scholarship, 20 were smokers. The working student does not always sacrifice his scholarship, as might be supposed. Forty-four percent of the honor students graduating from the undergraduate schools of Yale University, last June were students working their way through college. What is to be done with the $2,500 bequest of Emily J. Bryant, recently turned down by the Trustees of Vassar College? The money was to have been used as a scholarship find for students who played cards. It was declined on the ground that Vassar, an educational institution, cannot accept gifts placing restrictions upon the students’ personal or social behavior. Last year a student curricular committee at Hood College, Mary () land surveyed the college education system. Last May the committee submitted a report to the faculty, recommending a plan of class cuts for students with B grades or over. After a week of undergraduate discussion Yale College voted overwhelmingly for abolishing the compulsory feature of chapel. Two days of balloting resulted in a vote of 1681 for 241 against. By a 3 to 1 majority the faculty also expressed their disapproval of the institution. Students of Rutgers College, New Jersey, have voted to abolish the Honor System. Failure of the plan throughout most of its five years of existence is given as reason for the action. Enterprising radio fans at Harvard College, Pa., are planning an international intercollegiate chess match with the University of Argentine. Last year a match was arranged with Oxford University but was called off when nearly half completed by the British Government, because the University radio men’s license permitted the transmitting of experimental work only. At Trinity College, Hartford, Connecticut Malcolm Stevenson, managing editor of The Tripod, student publication, rebelled –and was suspended from college for a month. His Offense: editorial criticism of a statement by Dean Edward Troxell in a chapel speech. Dean Troxell said, “Our duty in college is to disregard the individual and to turn out a Trinity type.” In commenting on this Stevenson declared, “Better a radical with a beard and a bomb than a type-a goosestepper—a man without brains enough or courage enough to declare himself.” The oldest journalism school in the United States, founded in 1869, at Washington and Lee University at the time Robert E. Lee was president, has recently been reestablished. HOW WE KNOW ‘EM It wouldn’t be “Powers” if he didn’t want to know how many credits he was making, or to borrow a U.T. catalogue. It wouldn’t be “Jess Clark” if he didn’t run thru the doors when the dinner bells rings. It wouldn’t be “Tipps” if he didn’t want to bum a chew of tobacco. It wouldn’t be “Louise Woods” if she wasn’t acting goofy. It wouldn’t be “Brownie” if he wasn’t calling respiration –aspiration. It wouldn’t be “Mrs. Morton” if she wasn’t trying to be hard-boiled. It wouldn’t be “C.W. Davis” if he wasn’t pleading with the waiters to bring on more eats. It wouldn’t be “Amy Shipley” if she wasn’t arguing with “Mr. Me” in Psychology class. It wouldn’t be “Robert Rose” if he didn’t always have a bad smelling pipe in his mouth. Everything that is great in life is the product of slow growth; the newer, the greater, the higher, and the nobler the work, the slower is its growth, the surer is its lasting success. Mushrooms attain their full power in a night; oaks require decades. A fad lives its life in a few weeks; a philosophy through generations and centuries. –Jordan. One of the things in life which we use the most and value the least is language. It is the distinction of our race, our highest prerogative, the instrument of our progress. It is the bond of brotherhood, too, and the body in which truth becomes incarnate. The thought history of the race is written in the very structure of its speech; and a language or a dialect is as significant of great social forces now long spent as the strata of the earth’s surface are concerns seismic energies. –Adams. “The question for each man to settle is not what he would do if he had the means, time, influence and educational advantages; the questions is what he will do with what he has. The moment a young man ceases to dream or to bemoan his lack of opportunities and resolutely looks his conditions in the face, and resolves to change them, he leaves the corner stone of a solid and honorable success.” “Half the giant’s strength is in the conviction that he is a giant. The strength of a muscle is enhanced a hundredfold by the willpower. The same muscle, when removed from the giant’s arm, when divorced from the force of the might will, can sustain but a fraction of the weight it did a moment before it was disconnected. When we have practiced good actions awhile, they become easy; when they are easy, we take pleasure in them; when they please us, we do them frequently,; and then, by frequency of act, they grow into habit. –Tillotson. Seventy-six percent of all men students and thirty eight per cent of all women students at the University of Nebraska are wholly or partially self-supporting. Exclusive of the College of Law, the average expenditure per student for the nine months is shown by a recent survey to be $714.66 for the men and $714.66. Time’s the king of men. For he’s their parent, and he is their grave, And gives them what he will, not what they crave. --Shakespeare. CONSOLING PHILOSPHY It is better to have loved and lost than to get married and be bossed. THAT CUMBERLAND GAME In a previous issue of the Oracle an advance notice on the Tech-Cumberland game under the above heading was given and we were very optimistic of the results. In this issue under the same title we are attempting to tell—How We Lost. If view points are to be given as to why we lost, it might first be said that we had no game the preceding week, and as a consequence the team relaxed in its training. And, if the true be told, such was the case and part of the cause. Then we might say that Cumberland got all the breaks and as a consequence our morale was broken. And, if we speak alright, such was the case and part of the cause. Then we might say that Cumberland got all the breaks and as a consequence our morale was broken. And, if we speak alright, such was the case and part of the cause. And again as a consequence deserved to have won. And, again we say, such was the case and part of the cause. And so on and so on, far, far, into the ink of football blackness. But that’s not so bad! Remember King College! And for fear somebody isn’t inclined to interpret this article in the right spirit, Remember Pleasant Hill! () To get down to plain facts, after waiving the more or less nonsense above. Tech lost the game partly because she didn’t play football, play it for all there is in there, as she did against M.T.T.C. and hard enough to at least have lowered the score by a big majority, and partly because of Singleton –the versatile half-back, who punts, run, passes, and does anything else with seemingly equal ease, and who is possibly the equal of any half in the South. Captain Miller, playing his last game for Tech was outstanding in his efforts to stem the tide, but had to be taken out because of injuries in the third quarter. It seemed that he and Jobe were the only ones who were actually doing all they were capable of. Outside of these few things that was about all there was to it. By the way, in passing, we forgot to mention that the score was 51 to 0. Line-Up Tech Cumberland Watson L.E. Hicks Brown L.T. Chastain Moss L.G. Sims Clark, J. C. Humphries Miller R.G. Vaden Wilson R.T. Martin Davis, C. R.E. Wesson Hughes Q.B. Singleton Starnes L.H. Haney Dowell R.H. Cockrill Jobe F.B. Yeargin REVIEW OF FOOTBALL 1925 There are some who will say that Tech’s 1925 football season was a failure and there are some, of course, who will say that it was a success. The writer is of the opinion that is was a very successful one. Measured, even in terms of the number of games won, it should be counted successful, for any team who wins half of its scheduled games has certainly had a successful reason. But this is not all. A method of coaching –new to Tech, and which bespeaks greater results for the future—was begun, and a most satisfactory beginning it was. And yet not all. The fine spirit of harmony and team-work which was prevalent after the first game is sure to be beneficent to the men themselves and to call forth cherished memories in after years. In the first game of the season we were defeated by Gallatin Private Institute 14 to 0. The game was played on a muddy field, but instead of sticking to straight football, as might have been expected. Gallatin brought out something we were unable to cope with all season () a well ordered passing attack which proved our undoing. However, the game brought out many defects in the team and served to make it a more efficient machine for future opponents. The next week we completely smothered Castle Heights 54 to 0 and thus avenged our defeat at their hands the previous season. The following week we journeyed to Bowling Green, and by general alertness and smart football, played a perfect score on the gridiron keyboard to the tune of 12 to 6, at Ogden’s expense. Ogden had previously beaten Cumberland 6 to 3. The week afterwards was the big game of the season and we were determined to stop the much talked of “Teachers” of Middle Tennessee. We did—but they stopped us also. The score was 0 to 0 and was the result of one of the best games ever seen on the local field. The next week the team went to Russellville, Ky., for a game with Bethel but because of a deep snow the game was called off—much to the satisfaction of the Bethel coach—so it seemed. The following week we journeyed to Madisonville for a game with Hiwassee. The bunch won the game 39 to 2 mainly thru the efforts and success of Watson in receiving passes and of Jobe in ploughing the line at will. The next week, due to a misunderstanding with the Sewanee Freshmen, no game was played, and that it proved very disastrous the following week was easily to be seen. This game, the last of the season, was played with Cumberland, who crushed us under an avalanche of passes 51 to 0. Cumberland had the better team and deserves to win, but by not more than three touchdowns. It was a plain case of giving up after a few breaks went to the opposing team. If the team had given Cumberland the battle it gave M.T.T.C., the score would certainly have been much lower, probably in our favor –Singleton notwithstanding. Football Scores Tech 0 Oct. 2 G.P.I. 14 Tech 55 Oct. 9 Castle Hts. 0 Tech 12 Oct. 17 Ogden 6 Tech 0 Oct. 23 M.T.T.C. 0 Tech 39 Nov. 7 Hiwassee 2 Tech 0 Nov. 20 Cumberland 51 OUR FOOTBALL TEAM There are football teams and other football teams. Which should a school prefer, a team composed of eleven brutes who massacre their opponents with an avalanche of touchdowns, or a hard fighting team composed of gentlemen who can both win and lose with the same old ready smile? Any college would prefer the latter kind of team, and that is the type of football team that has represented T.P.I. this season. There was no place for a quitter on this team. There was no place for a coward or for the player who fights only for self glory. Every man on the team at all times did his best and when it became necessary, a little more for the team and T.P.I. The work of no player was characterized by anything low or dirty or foul. No player tried attain individual stardom. There was no a player who did not at all times have the interest of the team first in his heart. It has never been our pleasure to have associated with a cleaner group of gentlemen than the men on the team of ’25. () What more could be said of a team? Scores made on the gridiron are soon forgotten. Forgotten, too, are the great stars and their imposing records. But lessons learned on the gridiron are always remembered long after the stars have faded away. We on the sidelines never know the priceless things that a football player learns. Football players win victories over themselves that we never see. Students in a large university are never conscious of the self-denial made by the fellows who play football. But our team is a part of us. That is why we appreciate our team so much. That is why we compliment our players so highly; ad we know whereof we speak. Much of the team’s success is due to the efforts of coaches Overall and Smith. Instead of teaching the players to fight with a brutal ferocity, the coaches have succeeded in instilling the fighting spirit of real men into the players and in bringing out their qualities of true sportsmanship. Although our team won no championships, the players won hosts of friends and admirers whenever they appeared. The team which can stand victory and which can lose without “beefing” never knows the bitterness of defeat. There is nothing but victory. In conclusion it can be truthfully said that no other team has ever won its way into the hearts of the students of Tech as has this hard fighting team of ’25. FOOTBALL SQAD GUESTS OF T.P.I.A.A. AT BANQUET On Friday evening, Dec. 4th, the Athletic Association entertained the members of the 1925 Football squad with an effective, well-planned banquet. About forty couples were seated at a large T-shaped table, the decorations of which developed a gold and black color note. A basket filled with an artistic arrangement of yellow Chrysanthemums and ferns was the central adornment of the table. Cut glass candlesticks holding gold and black tapers and smaller vases of Chrysanthemums and ferns, placed at intervals, further carried out the chosen colors motif. Miniature down-boxes were used as nut cups. The place cards were miniature football men in Tech uniforms. A delicious four-course menu was served. Mr. T.W. Kittrell acted as toastmaster, and the program for the evening was as follows: () Review of Team of ’25 Coach Overall Speaking of Outlook of ’26 Coach Smith The Scrubs and Their Relation to Literary Works Dean Smith Athletics on a Higher Plane Prof. McClanahan Miscellaneous Talk Jess Clark Relationship of Future of Athletic Pres. Smith Charge to New Captain Capt. James Miller Response --Captain of 1926 Eddie Watson Retiring Capt. Miller presented the Coaches—Overall and Smith, with small remembrances from the Football Squad. Letters were awarded members of the varsity. Eddie Watson, star left end of the team, was elected captain for next year. This brilliant affair was a fitting, conclusion to one of the most successful football seasons in the history of Tech. NEWS NOTES On Friday, Nov. 20th., Dean Austin W. Smith, accompanied by Robert Rose, Willie Gentle and Robert E. Smith, who were on their way to the ball game at Lebanon, visited the High School at Alexandria. The entire morning was taken up with this visit and each of the visitors made a favorable report on the cordial reception of the faculty and student boy. In his address before the student body Dean Smith took occasion to compliment the faculty on the excellent work being done in both the elementary and high school departments. Many progressive movements have been undertaken at this school during the past few years, one of which is to increase the already splendid library. All of the visitors were very much impressed with the program given by one of the societies and supervised by the faculty. The faculty has the confidence of the community as well as its cooperation which fact has enabled great things to be accomplished. Miss Gladys Atwood, an old T.P.I. student, is very favorably remembered by those who taught her at T.P.I. one of the teachers in the Alexandria elementary school. President Smith visited Carthage recently in the interest of Tech. Dean Smith has been accused of being a raging Democrat since his chapel oration for the World Court. A few more days of work before Christmas. Let’s make them count. School will be demised for holidays December 18th, and everyone will be off for a happy Christmas. Have a delightful time, and be back ready for work December 29th. We are glad indeed to note that Mr. Passon’s father is improving, and we wish him a speedy recovery. The deepest regret of the Campus girls is that Quentin, Jr., is not large enough to chauffeur his dad’s new Studebaker. Frame your mind to mirth and merriment. Which bars a thousand harms, and lengthens life. –Shakespeare. Y.W.C.A. NOTES The Y.W.C.A. sent two delegates to the Christian Students’ Conference at Chattanooga, Nov. 27, 1925. The delegates, Miss Auby Scott and Miss Ruth Weaver, reported the conference as being marked by enthusiasm and inspiring discussions. The World Court was the main topic considered, the leaders and students strongly advocating America’s entering into it. The President of the Y.W.C.A. at T.P.I. urges all students to study this important question in order that they may be prepared to vote intelligently on December 4. When we are in the satisfaction of some innocent pleasure, or pursuit of some laudable design, we are in possession of life. Few things are impossible to diligence and skill. It is the height of folly to throw up attempting because you have failed. Failures are wonderful elements in developing the character. --Muller. “But pleasures are like oppies spread— You seize the flower, its bloom is shed.” THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute\ Printed by the Herald Publishing Co. Entered as Second class matter at the Cookeville Postoffice, Cookeville, Tenn. EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief Bryce D. Stone ‘26 Assistant Editor Edward McKay ‘27 ASSOCIATE EDITORS Athletics M. Douglas Robbins ‘27 Wit and Humor David Dow ‘29 Exchange Elizabeth Ensor ‘28 Classes Martha Sedivak ‘27 Society Shella Officer ‘29 Alumni Hazel Wall ‘27 Mary Crenshaw ’26 Literary Editor Faculty Advisor Thos. L. Passons BUSINESS Business Manager Lee S. Darwin ‘27 Asst. Cir. Manager Nola Quarles ‘27 Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY LIFE PURPOSE The busy world shows angrily aside The man who stands with arms akimbo set Until occasion tells him what to do And he who waits to have his task marked out She’ll die and leave his errand unfulfilled He who floats lazily down the stream in pursuit of something borne along by the same current, will find himself indeed moved forward; but unless he lays his hand to the oar and “speeds up” by his own labor, he must be always about the same distance from that which he is following. In the voyage of life we must not drift but steer. Every youth should form, at the outset of his career, the solemn purpose to make the most and the best of the powers given him and to turn to the best possible account every outward advantage within his reach. This purpose must carry with it the assent of reason, the approval of the conscience and the sober judgement of the intellect. It should then embody within itself whatever is vehement in desire, inspiring in hope, thrilling in enthusiasm and intense in desperate resolve. Such a plan of life will save him from many a damaging contest with temptation. It will regulate his sports and recreations. Those who labor and study under the inspiration of such a purpose will soon soar out of sight of those who barely allow themselves to be carried along by the momentum of the machinery to which they are attached. In nothing is childhood more strongly distinguished from manhood than in this, that the child has no purpose, no plan in life, no will by which his energies are directed. The man has his own purpose, his own plan, his own life and aim. The sorrowful experience of multitudes in this respect is that they are never men but children all their days. Think out your work then work out your thought. No one can pursue a worthy object, with all the powers of his mind, and make his life a failure. A man may work in the dark, yet one day light shall arise upon his labor; and though he may never with his own lips declare the victory complete someday others will behold in his life work the traces of a great and thinking mind. What a different place this would be if other activities were given as much thought as Athletics. And yet it requires both sides to develop a student properly. WHY GO TO COLLEGE? As a variation from the regular contents of this column we are printing an article on the "Honor System." This is the system of student government in most of our large colleges- and as such should 'be of interest to any student who contemplates entering college. —Editor. WHAT DOES THE HONOR SYSTEM INVOLVE? The term "honor system" is used to indicate the formal recognition and adoption by students and faculty of a system of mutual responsibility among students for honest scholastic work. The purpose of this system is to enlist the co-operation of students for the maintenance of fair play and honesty or preparation and performance of classroom activities. The immediate and ultimate aims of the honor system which may be considered of most significance are: It rests fundamentally upon the initiative of undergraduates, and initiative always has potential good as a possibility: it is dependent upon unity of purpose and community of effort, which is another valuable asset when turned in the right direction: it tends to bring a frank and candid relation between the students and the administrative force of an institution: it tends toward increasing the loyalty to an institution, by strengthening public opinion in regard to the virtue of honesty: it increases individual responsibility, which may take a marked drop during college days: it breeds confidence and self-respect in similar situations: as a rule it appeals to the better class of students, and leads them to look at their own actions and the actions of other fellows from the point' of view of an adult: it utilizes the stronger characters to help bolster up the weaker ones. Student government is a term used to indicate that the administration of the college, as far as student activities are concerned, is in the hands of students. The honors system is in reality a subdivision of student government and is usually an indication of a highly developed form a student government. It may cover all forms of student activities and conduct, or it may involve the examination only. However, it loses in efficiency when applied to too wide a range of activities. The operation of this system usually involves the signing of a pledge neither to give nor to receive help, but in some colleges it would be considered an insult to be asked to sign a pledge. There is a considerable disagreement among the claimant for the credit of having initiated the first well-defined honor system in an educational institution of higher learning in this country. The University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, has almost universally been credited with being the originator. The faculty minutes of May 4. 18f2, show the formal adoption of the organized system in this institution. The University of South Carolina. and the College of William, and Mary practiced the honor sys, tern in an informal way before 1842, but the University of Virginia was the first to inaugurate a definite system of control, legislation, and form of penalties. According to a survey made in 1915, 123 institutions practice the honor system in all or a few departments. Some authorities claim that this system is more successful in small colleges than in large ones. In the larger universities, the honor system is independent of any form of student government. In the smaller colleges, it is the natural outgrowth of the participation of students in the direction and control of their various collegiate activities. Many institutions have an honor system in vogue spirit but not in organization: while others favor it, but the sentiment is not sufficiently mature to put it into practice. The 123 institutions that are trying the system are its strongest advocates, and there has been a steady but marked tendency toward general adoption throughout this country. Some authorities regard the honor system as the only agency that will prevent cheating in examinations. To secure the best results from any form of the honor system, both student and faculty sentiment should be in favor of its adoption and it is most successful when the initiative for' its adoption comes from the students. Students, must be willing to accept the obligation of reporting any - student who violates the system. Violations of 4 the honor system should consist of any attempt to receive assistance front written aids or from any person, or paper, or in any attempt to give assistance, whether the one so doing has completed his own paper or not. Offenders must be treated kindly but justly. A cheating student dishonors his whole class and lowers the tone of the college. It is. the duty of the students of the college where this system is practiced to see that no dishonest paper ever goes into the hands of an instructor and to make it impossible for stolen work to receive credit or for hilt to remain permanently in the college. An administrative council, composed of students and faculty, should give decisions on violations of this system. Final jurisdiction in regard to penalties is very successfully administered in a number of large institutions by the students but in general it is better to have this power rest ultimately with the faculty or the board of trustees. There must be hearty cooperation between students and () faculty. In adopting the honor system the students are given to understand that the faculty assume that they can be trusted. Therefore, the instructor may or may not be present during the examination. If he is present, he is there the purpose of giving instructions and making the examination dear. It is not possible to recommend a single type of constitution for organization of 'the hem& system, hut 'the constitution and by-laws should be short, simple, and definite, since new and untried students must be educated yearly. Likewise every two or three years. The people who oppose the honor system are greatly in the minority. Their chief arguments against it may be summed up as follows: Classroom honesty is an academic matter; some people believe, therefore, that it should be under faculty jurisdiction and control. Some executives do not care to give. more control to students since these duties are difficult to define and Lake the students' time from the regular studies. Students contend also that it tends to burden the better or more honest students with the shortcomings of the delinquent ones. In some communities there is a sentiment that signing a pledge implies dishonesty, and in many institutions there is still a feeling that individual honor does not involve the reporting of theft and dishonest on the part of others. Some large institutions have such a cosmopolitan group of students that homogeneity in the classroom ideals is difficult to secure and maintain small institutions have younger preparatory students to include in their regulations. But, on the other hand. a large majority of the college and university authorities have the same idea as Prof. Edward S. Joyner of the University of South Carolina who wrote that "the only true system for the education of a gentleman by gentlemen is the honor system—that is, the system of mutual respect and confidence." The success of the honor system is due in the main to the natural desires of the students to formulate ideals for themselves, the interest for co-operative activity and teamwork and the pride involved in creating college public sentiment and college loyalty. NOTICE—In making up the first page we accidentally got five lines of the basketball write-up at the foot of the first column story of the Glee Clubs, omitting these five lines the story read right on. –Printer. PALLADIAN LITERARY SOCIETY Whereas, God in his infinite wisdom has seen' fit to call from earth the father of our, beloved society member, Charlotte Watson; and, Whereas, we deem it fitting and proper that we should give expression to our love and affection for her in her bereavement in the form of resolution; Therefore, be it resolved; That we the members of the Palladian Literary Society desire to express our genuine appreciation for her and to extend our sympathy to her and her mother. Be it further resolved that a copy of these resolutions be sent to the family a copy to the press, and a copy spread on the minutes of the society. HAZEL WALL, Chairman, MARTHA SEDIVAK, REBECCA JOHNSTON, MARY ELLEN SHANKS, Committee on Resolutions. December 2, 1925 SHERWOOD Sherwood Literary Society met in the regular meeting room, Monday Nov. 30th, 1925th, and rendered the following program; Invocation –Bill Gentle The roll was answered with a Bible quotation. Debate; resolved, that the development of a pleasing personality while in college is more important than the acquisition of facts. Affirmative –Alvin Jackson, Tim Huddleston. Negative—A. Clark, Jack Morrison Current Events. BELLES LETTRES In spite of the fact that about half our girls are preparing to entertain "Professor Pepp" in the near future, we had a very interesting, though impromptu, program on Nov. 30, Often an informal meeting calls forth more activity and arouses more enthusiasm than the regulation program. Let's each act as a committee of one solely responsible for the advertising of "Professor Pepp." Tell everybody and send word to the rest. UPPER CUMBERLAND The Upper Cumberland Society met in its regular meeting room Monday, Nov. 30th. This day had been set aside •for the election of officers for the coming term the following officers were elected: Jesse R. Clark President. Earl Tipps Vice-President Wm. S. Massa Secretary Robert E. Smith Treasurer Monroe Powers Attorney-General Sewell Brown Sergeant-at-Arms Douglas Robbins Critic Each elected officer expressed his appreciation and promised to serve to the best of his ability. With such a body of officers as we now have, next term promises to be one of the best in the history of our society. We wish to express our appreciation for the retiring officers, as they have served faithfully and well. Let's go Upper Cumberlands and make the spirit ring. PALLADIAN SOCIETY The Palladian Society dispenses with their regular Monday afternoon program and elected the following officers for the second term; Pres Martha Sedivak Vice-Pres Rozelle Pendergrass Secretary Elise Gregory Treasurer Agnes Greenwood Critic Hazel Wall Yell Leader Louise Woods With these competent leaders, the work of the society during the second term will be promoted. JOKES Elsic –What is the matter with your hand? Puckett –I was down town getting some cigarettes and some bum stepped on it. Martha (at Football game) –So the players wear numbers for their identification. Dan –Yes. Martha – I didn’t know they were killed enough for that. Merrill –Will you marry me? Dan –Yes. Merrill –But the doctor says my life will be short. Dan –Is it insured? Mary Ellen Shanks –Eddie, what are you going to give me for Christmas? Eddie –Close your eyes. (She closes her eyes). Now what do you see? Mary ellen –Nothing. Eddie –Well that’s what you are going to get. Health Inspector –Is this a fraternity house? Senior –Yes. Health Inspector –Are there any rats around? Senior –No, they died of starvation. Victim –you’ve pulled three teeth. I only wanted one pulled Dentist –Yes, Yes, we gave you a bit too much gas a I didn’t want to waste it. Man in speeding car –High fence isn’t it? Driver –that’s no fence, them’s telephone poles. Rose –I had a tooth pulled this morning. Clark –did you have an anesthetic? Rose—No, a toothache.

1925 December 14

 The Tech Oracle Miss Rebecca Johnston, Queen of May Ten Other Girls Chosen for Maids to Queen When we look back through the annals of history to the days of Cleopatra and Helen of Troy or, if by chance, we glance through the pages of fiction where Juliet and Rosalind reign supreme, we are inclined to wonder if the belles of old Teen do not make these pictures seem rather hazy and obscure. On Tuesday morning twenty girls passed before the student body in beauty revue. These girls were selected as the beauties of Tech and it was a difficult task to select eleven from the following group: Rebecca . Johnston, Eleanor Haile, Lucile Lee, Sammie Ruth Womack, Mary Ellen. Rash, Mary Nella Graham, Elsie Young, Louise -Settle, Maurine Quarles, Mary Ellen Watson, Bertie Brown, Marie Peters, Hazel Tompson, Lucile Camaeron, Pearle . Cornwell, Jesse Barnes, Muriel. Gipson, Mayme Gibson, Pauline Hudgens, and Cora Belle Frizzell. After a close contest the first eleven girls were chosen, as the beauties to be the maids to the Queen of May at the Festival. On the following day came the contest to—choose the Queen from the chosen eleven. This honor was bestowed upon Miss Rebecca Johnston whose stately name, beautiful face and features, and rank as senior gave her the coveted place. Miss Johnston will be crowned Queen of "Tech" on May Day. Emily Stanton Wins in Voice Contest At the State Federation of Music Clubs which met in Springfield last week Miss Emily Banton, who was a student of T. P. I. last year and will also be here during the short spring term, won the first prize of $25.00 in the State contest for girls' voices. Miss Tennie Alma Stanton attended the meeting and was a judge in the piano contests and appeared with Mrs. W. A. Howard in a two-piano number on one of the evening concerts. April 26, Opening Date of Short Spring Term The Short Spring Term will open on April 26 and continue for six weeks, closing June 3. Reservations have already been made to fill the girls' dormitory to its capacity, three girls being () placed in many of the rooms. Indications are that at least one hundred new students will register for this term and the majority of them will remain for summer school. Some additional instructors will be secured to take charge of the classes which will be organized at that time. This term beginning at this time of the year is proving very beneficial to the teachers whose schools did not close in time for them to enter at the opening o the regular spring term. Cumberland loses first game to Tech 4-2; wins second 5-3 Bulldogs Stage Comeback and win last came in double header With Arlie Moss twirling the old pill in true virtuoso fashion, the Tech Eagles swooped down on the veteran Cumberland University Bulldogs Wednesday April 13, and carried off the victory in the first of a two-game series. The game presented all the thrills of an evenly matched bout until Winningham in the eighth brought two men in with a two bagger which gave Tech a lead of two points. Strain as they might, the Bulldogs could not even the score. Cook pitched one inning for Cumberland, striking out three men. He was replaced by Hicks, who during the remainder of the game, struck out five men. Moss showed his true metal by allowing the visitors only seven hits, while the Eagles collected ten off Cook and Hicks. The hitting of Moss, Summers, and Blount for T.P.I. and Baird and Hood for Cumberland featured. In the second game, Cumberland was more successful, although there were no outstanding plays. Summers pitched for T.P.I. and Baird and Hood for Cumberland featured. In the second game, Cumberland was more successful, although there were no outstanding plays. Summers pitched for T.P.I. while Cumberland put three or four different pitchers in the box. The Eagles displayed good team work in both games, and we may expect further victories from them during the remainder of the season. Sherwoods Win Annual Intersociety Debate Stanley Carr and Leonard Crawford Carry Old Rose and Gray to Victory The Sherwoods won the annual intersociety debate for the fourth consecutive year on April 8, when the judges gave a unanimous decision in their favor. The Upper Cumberland speakers, Paul Moore and Robert Smith supported the affirmative side of the question “Resolved That Labor Unions, As They Exist Today, On the Whole Are Beneficial, while the negative side was defended by () the Sherwoods, Stanley Carr and Leonard Crawford. A large crowd of enthusiastic supports of each society attended the debate. The affirmative speakers advanced arguments to show that labor unions had benefitted the American public by securing increased wages and shorter work hours for all workers; legislating better working conditions, and the employment of women and children in factories; collective bargaining; a decrease in strikes; arbitration of disputes; raise in workmen’s standard of living and have helped in the establishment of the compulsory school law, the elimination of communism and Bolshevism from America, the Americanization program, and Industrial Democracy. On the other hand, the negative contended that Labor unions do not benefit laboring men generally; and are not economically sound; pollute politics; crush honest states men and force class legislation; curtail individual productivity of members; and that methods used by the union infringe on nonunion workers. The usual clashes over authorities, and several humorous remarks added to the interest of the discussion. The judges who were from the University of Tennessee were R.B. Parsons department of education; A.D. Morse, College of Liberal Arts; M.B. Hamer, department of history. Leather bills folds were presented the Sherwood speakers by their own co-workers, the Belles-Lettres. The Palladians presented gold watch charms to the representatives of their brother society, the Upper Cumberland. The Upper Cumberland Orgchestra consisting of piano, Virginia Wilcox, saxophones, Lauren O’dell, Robert Cox, trumpet, Frank Neely; and drums, Albert Brogden furnished music. New Loan Fund for T.P.I Given by Cookeville Book Lovers’ Club The Cookeville Book Lovers Club which has been contributing something annually to the promotion of education, decided to change the channel through which to exert its efforts, so far as this one piece of its work is concerned. When trying to find the place that its contribution would fill the greatest need and do the most good it was agreed that nothing better could be done than to establish a student loan fund at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. The loan fund is to be known as the Cookeville Book Lovers loan fund and is to be controlled by the same regulations as are other loan funds at this institution. The amount that the members of this club raised for this purpose is $50.00 Whether this loan fund is large or small, it is one that is greatly appreciated by Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. It. is the first fund that has been added to the T. P. I. loan fund by any organization or individual. We hope it is the first of many that are to be added in the future. It is encouraging to have a local club feel that it could find no better way of doing a piece of constructive work than by setting aside this money to be used by worthy students of this Upper Cumberland section. We are already convinced of the worthwhileness of a student loan fund. We make some effort each year to increase this fund. The interest shown by this club should make us more zealous in our support of the Shakepearian play which is given for this purpose. Bethel College Falls Before Tech in Initial Game Confronted with almost their equal in baseball classification, the Golden Eagles wn the initial game of their season by a 4 to 2 score. Not only did the Eagles win the game, but in the winning of it, they showed the pep and vim that looks like a real winning team for the season. It was in the second inning when Little made his way across home plate. The game waswon in the sixth when with Nixon and Winningham on bas, Watson doubled to centerfield, scoring Nixon and sending Winningham to third, from which he scored on K Evans single to right field. The last of the scores crossed the plate in the eighth inning. Summers, the Southpaw trick ball artist, opened and pitched a four hit game. Fourteen of the Kentuckians succumbed to his hooks. In addition, he delivered a nice hit in a pinch, which scored Little. Rogers, for the visitors was unable to keep up the pace of the game and his base-jointed type of delivery was given over to Grisham, a Southpaw, in the sixth inning. Grisham was only scored on once, but several times he was in a hole that he, by some miraculous way was able to overcome. Score by innings R H E Bethel 00 100 100 2 4 4 T.P.I. 010 020 01 4 12 3 Spring Football Training Ends with Game For almost six weeks Coach Smith has been putting his large squad of football candidates through hard scrimage every afternoon. The squad was divided into two teams about two weeks ago, the "white" and the "gold", and these two teams have been working hard preparing for the final struggle that came Tuesday afternoon, April 12. This long sought for battle between the two teams was settled to the satisfaction of both teams. When the whistle blew for the end, the score stood 0 to 0. The game was a bitterly fought one, full of hard tackles and insulting invective. Both teams were able to get within about 8 yards of the goal line, but by some misfortune they were both turned back before any real damage was done. The game was a continued battle shifting from one end of the gridiron to the other The playing of this game closed the spring practice which the coaches have expressed as, "one of the best things that has ever been done for the upbuilding of next years varsity team." “The Eagle” In Hands of Printers The manuscript for “The Eagle” has been sent to the McQuiddy Printing Company and printing will begin immediately. The staff has worked hard to make this annual worth much to the students and one to be proud of, and they have succeeded. It is thirty-two pages larger than that of last year and has many unique and interesting features in addition to the material usually found in annuals. Home Study of Highschool Seniors To determine whether time devoted to home study by pupils in Western High School, Baltimore, is apportioned to the best advantage in preparation of different subjects in the curriculum, a questionnaire was sent to about 275 senior students. Answers show that history receives the most home-study time, an average of 80 minutes. Latin comes next, with an average of 58 minutes, then stenography, 57 minutes; mathematics, 46; and modern languages and chemistry with an average of 45 minutes each. Pupils reported an average of 42 minutes home study of English and 38 minutes of biology. The average per pupil time for each subject is 53 minutes, or about three hours and a half of home stud in all. This is thought to be an overestimate rather than an underestimate. A practical result of the survey has been to reduce the history assignment, which entails library work, and by readjustments of others to make more time available for home study in the subjects now below the median –School life University Encourages Practical Study of Botany A wild flower contest to continue 10 years in the schools of the State, has been projected by the University of Texas with the purpose of familiarizing teachers and pupils with wild flowers of their own locality. Annual exhibits will be prepared by the schools to consist of 30 specimens, 10 each gathered I the fall, winter, and spring, pressed and mounted according to directions announced by the professor of botany of the University, who is director of the contest. The scheme contemplates preparation of exhibits in triplicate and retention of one set by participating schools. The best exhibit in each county will be sent to the university. At the expiration of the 10 year period the university will have a collection of wild flowers from different parts of the State and each school participating will possess and exhibit of 300 authentically identified wild flowers of its locality. The process of collection is purposefully made gradual in order that pupils may learn the specimens thoroughly, and that the members received at the university at any one time may not be too great. –School Life The Lady of my Delight When the coals have burned to embers And the lamplight flickers low, Something tells me she remembers Something tells me –and I know That her eyes have lost the shining, Soft, deep witchery--once they had, And that somewhere she is pining For her faithless Galahad. Softly now the shadows thicken And a score of spirits and frays— Sweet tormentors—come to quicken Memories of dead yesterdays Pensive sorrow: burning token Of the love that once was mine; Oh, that I had never spoken, Never worshipped at her shrine! Every shadow breathes the essence Of her gentle soothing ways; Her dark eyes held the quintessence Of all love, and in the blaze Of my fireside glimmering lower, With a questioning surmise Burning through my bosom's core— I can see those hazel eyes! Soft they glow, like visions float From the land of dreams and sleep, And they set me doting, doting, On the secrets I must keep. She is gone from me forever, Oh, what devilish chastisement! But no man will get her-ever, She's a chemise advertisement! Vadus Carmack Words Someone has said, “Words are pegs to hang ideas on”. Then we must be very careful in our choice of words for the wrong idea may be obtained from them, for “words fitly speaken are like apples of gold in piatchers of silver.” “Think twice before you speak” is an axiom that cannot be too carefully heeded for words once spoken cannot be recalled. The following poem has a wonderful meaning: “Keep a watch on your words, my darling, For words are wonderful things; They are sweet like the bees’ refresh honey, Like the bees, they have terrible stings. They can soothe in a time of anguish; They can brighten a lonely life; They can cut in the strife of anger Like an open two-edged knife.” Sophomore Class The Sophomores continue to meet-and hold interesting meetings. Mr. Carmack was in charge of the last program given by the class. He presented several clippings frpm the "Putnam County Herald" of the year 1950. According to these reports there can be no doubt that there is a bright future in store for the various members of this class. The Sophomore class is proud to boast of the fact that of the four debates of the inter-society contest, which was held recently that three of these brilliant young men are members of this class. Sherwood Society The spirit of the Sherwood society has never been higher than at the present. This was well demonstrated in a pep meeting just proceeding the debate in which we added from twenty five to thirty new members to the two societies and later in the two societies and later in the annual debate in which the Sherwoods won by a unanimous decision. This is four years in succession in which the Sherwoods have won the debate. We are now entering the contests which are to come off in the near future with the same determination which has meant victory for us in the past. Miranda Her cheeks are roses of delight Upon sheen of creamy snow; Her hair is like the shampoo ads, Her teeth are pearls-a gleaming row Encased in carmine lips so red, Her eyes are pools of heavenly blue; Her knees are dimpled like her cheeks, And more electrifying too! She’s just a wonder, nothing less; She makes the fellows all go “flop” When she walks by-but then I guess SHE knows the way to the Beauty Shoppe! A Freshman Tragedy (Vadus Carmack) There was a boy from our school And he was wondrous dumb, He bought a campus ticket And lost a tidy sum; And when he saw what he had lost He took his stock and store And bought a pass to the bathroom And lost a great deal more! Sign in a bookshop: “The Sleeping Lady” is a paper covers. Something new in bedclothes-what? I often went and hooked the eggs Which made my neighbor sore. He hit upon a plan to check My looted gains, ill gotten, He threw a few up under the floor Which broke and they were rotten! And now the earth resounds with an irregular, monotonous cadence. It reverberates thru the hills, sweeps over the plains, and fills the ether with static. All day long, and far into the wee, small hours of the morning we hear a semi-rhythmic click-clack, bim bam! Smash bang! What is it? Oh, yes the collegiate poets are heralding the arrival of Spring! Freshmen at McGill University, Montreal, Can. Are forced to carry song books to all of their classes and are not allowed to speak to upper classmen. The Tech Oracle Official publications of the students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute Published Semi-Monthly Subscription rates: $1.50 per year Editorial Staff Editor in chief Hazel Wall Assistant Editor Eleanor Haile Assistant Editor Benton M. Carr Associate Editors Athletic Harry Burrow Wit and Humor Robert Smith Exchange Alberta Cassetty Class Editor Odeli Cornwell Alumni Rebecca Johnston Feature Editor Jonnie Billbrey Poet Vadus Carmack Business Manager David Terry Assistant Business Manager Circulation Manager Paul Tidwell Asst. Circ. Manager Alfred Gill Faculty advisor J.M. Hatfield Pity the English Instructor Mr. H.L. Mencken, whom someone aptly called a connoisseur of human ignorance would enjoy the Log Book kept by the English Department at the University of North Carolina. In that amusing journal is kept a record of the outstanding boners committed by freshmen and other. Here it is recorded by one freshman that David Copperfield’s novels are infinitely superior to anything Dickens ever wrote. Another first yearling recalled having read Hawthorne’s House of Seven Gabriels. Gems are gulled from compositions. A freshman describing a singer said “She had a charming voice of melodious noise.” Lincoln’s mind, another essayist reminds us, “growed as his country kneaded it.” “I pulled through a disease,” another recalls, “which was a victim of my sister. She was a microbe hunter, we presume.” In public speaking class, an embryo Patrick Henry Exclaimed “Mr. Speaker, I smell a rat in my opponent’s remarks, but I propose to kill him while it’s young.” Pity the poor English instructor! A class at George Washington University recently waited fifteen minutes for an instructor and then dispersed. The next day the instructored claimed to have been in the class because he had left his hat on the desk. On the following day upon entering the classroom he was greeted with rows of chairs occupied only by hats, but not one student. Our informant does not state whether or not the instructor left his hat and went home. A student at Western Maryland College desired a grand piano. His room was not large enough to hold both piano and bed so he may be seen peacefully slumbering on the musical instrument every night. Resolutions of thanks to the book lovers club At a recent meeting of the United College Classes the following resolutions were adopted. Whereas the Book-Lover’s Club of Cookeville, has through the sale of tickets for the Strand Theater of the city added materially to the Student Loan Fund of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute express through these resolutions our thanks and appreciation for this addition to our loan fund and be it further resolved, that the secretary be, and is hereby instructed to give a copy of these resolutions to the Book Lover’s Club, and a copy to “The Tech Oracle” for publication. Senior College Class The matriculation for the spring quarter brought the enrollment of the senior class up to twenty seven, of which numbered, 20-21, will graduate either at the end of the spring semester or at the end of the summer quarter. The seniors are well represented in the various activities of the student body. We are well represented on the various athletic teams, and in the casts of the various play. Miss Rebeccaa Johnston has been chosen from our midst to be “Queen of the may”, Miss Eleanor Haile has been elected the most popular girl in school, and Mr. Robley Jobe was selected as the best all round boy in school. The Senior class is planning a supper hike to be held at an early date. All members are expected to go, and all are anticipating a good time. High School Requirements of the Engineering Colleges A study of the entrance requirements of 154 engineering colleges will distributes over ing every type of Engineering College, shows that the standard requirement for entrance is 15 units. Of these three must be in mathematics, three in English, and usually two in science. The remaining units are distributed over a wide field of selection. The course in mathematics required by most of the colleges reporting were as follows: Algebra 1.5 units. Plane Geometry 1 unit, Solid Geometry one half unit. About 80 per cent of those colleges will admit students with conditions amounting to from 1 to 2 units; but in most cases require that the condition be removed by the beginning of the sophomore year. Apparently a large percentage of the students admitted with conditions in Mathematics have their deficiency in solid geometry and the third half-unit of algebra. The report of this study also shows that fully two thirds of the students who fail in engineering are deficient in mathematics, indicating the importance of securing the most thorough training in high school mathematics, for these expecting to study engineering when they go to college. Failure to graduate either due to lack of interest, lack of ability, or poor preparations 69.5% Fraternity, social and other activities 8.5% Self support 8.1% Bad health 4.7% Unknown causes 9.2% Total 100% Palladians and Upper Cumberlands The palladian and Upper Cumberland Literary Societies held a joint meeting on Monday, April 11th. An unusually interesting program was enjoyed by all. After the program sandwiches and drinks were served by a joint committee. The meeting was full of “pep” and everyone was very enthusiastic. Thelma Music "What would we do in this world of ours, were it not for the dreams ahead?" Always before us, like a bright, beckoning star, are the dreams of what we shall do in the "afterwhile." Sometime we shall paint a beautiful picture, write a wonderful book, or put on paper that haunting bit of melody that has sung through our heads these many years. Dreams all of them, yet dreams are the factors that make life worthwhile. What are dreams? Can we define them? They are so intangible and illusive that, though we may hold one in our hands and think to examine it minutely, it escapes our eager grasp, and is gone into the land of memory. Yet we do know that reams are of a fairy-like beauty. In their varied shapes we see all the colors of the rainbow melting and shading into one another, Changing each moment, "yet ever the same." Dreams are made of some airy fabric, whose texture is so fine that a breath will blow it away. Since the beginning of time man has dreamed. The caveman dreamed of less-brutal warfare, of fire-making appartus, of cooked, food and so, a crude civiliation was evolved. What would world be today if it had not been for dreams? If Columbus had not dreamed of westward route to India the progress of the world would have been stayed for years. Charlemagne dreamed of a drifted empire and gave to the world its first conception of a strong, centralized government. Caeser dreamed of conquest, and added large territories to the Roman Empire. Benjamin Franklin dreamed that "the lightning could be harnessed." and gave to us electricity with its manifold blessings. Abraham Lincoln dreamed of a time when the glorious flag of our nation should wave over a free people, and he lived to see his dream realized. Someone dreamed of college for the young people of the Upper Cumberland section, and we have T. P. I. Some member of the present State Legislature dreamed that the schools of the state needed better buildings, better qualified teachers, and a longer school term; so we are to have an appropriation of seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars ($750,000) for this purpose. Dreams all of them! Yet the results have been far-reaching, and will be known through out the ages. Our dreams should have a purpose, and work toward a result like the examples given, not idle dreams, "we are not here to dream, to drift; we have burdens to bear, and loads to lift" In sections of my home county where superstition still holds sway, each dream has a meaning. I would have you give your dreams a meaning, a God-born purpose. Then live up to and towards this_ purpose. Dream of your daily tasks. Dream that each one counts and means something in the Mastur's Dream of your life, and when you can do this and can say to yourself, "I dreamed I did what the other fellow couldn't, and my dream came true" then will you realize that dreams are the .stuff of which men are made! Dream on! I would not wake you if I could. Calendar of Spring Quarter 1927 April 20 Tech Oracle Banquet May 6 “T” Club Banquet May 7 High School Junior Senior Reception 8 pm May 13 College Junior Senior Reception May 19 Annual Picnic –Special train to Mayland May 28 Oratorical Contest 8 pm May 29 Commencement Sermon May 31 The Taming of the Shrew 8 pm June 1 Declamation Contest 10 am June 1 Reading Contest June 2 Class day exercises June 2 Alumni banquet June 3 Commencement exercises 10 am The examinations for the Spring Quarter will be held Monday and Tuesday, May 30 and 31. The date for the Eagle Staff Banquet has not been set. Tomas L. Passons Chairman Student, Activities Committee. Miss Catherine Hargis Becomes Bride of Walter Birdwell The marriage of Miss Catherine Mgddux Hargis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Talmadge De-Witt---Hargis to Walter Birdwell, on Saturday afternoon, was an event of especial interest to Cookeville where the bride and groom both are popularly known. The two are members of families long prominent in their home county. The ceremony took place at the Presbyterian church at Granville, Rev. Van Smith officiating. The wedding music was given by Mrs. Judkins of Gordonsville pianist, and Mrs. Walter Cooper, vocalist. The church- altar was decorated with palms and Easter lilies and contained the lighted tapers in Cathedral candlesticks and developed the proposed color scheme of green and white. In the bridal party were the ring bearer, little Betty Katherine Reeves, the bride's cousin. Maid of honor was Miss Margaret Hargis, while Mrs. Herbie Shanks served as matron of honor. The bride's younger sister, Rebecca, was junior maid with orange blossoms, a shower bouquet of roses, sweet peas and lilies of the valley was carried. Miss Hargis wore orchid crepe with picture hat of the same shade. Her flowers were yellow roses with sweet peas. Mrs. Shanks was gowned in green flat crepe with lavender hat and carried lilies of 'the valley. Rebecca Hargis wore pink-flat crepe with hat to match, her flowers were pastel shades of sweet peas. Betty Katherine Reeves wore pink crepe with pink hat and carried the ring in an Easter lily. At one o'clock intimate friends of the bride and groom were entertained at a buffet luncheon. Mrs. Haile and Mrs. Henderson served from a lace-covered table which had an attractive center of violets and roses. They were assisted by Mita Byrne. Mr. and Mrs. Birdwell each received their education at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, Mrs. Birdwell being a member of the Class of 24, and Mr. Birdwell of the Class of 23. Mrs. Birdwell was a member of the Palladian Literary Society while Mr. Birdwell belonged to the Sherwoods. After an extensive western tour this young couple will reside in Nashville where the groom holds a position with the Fourth and First National Bank. Belles Lettres The Belles Lettres Literary Society met Monday, April 11, in their regular meeting room. After the program was finished several members signified their intentions of entering the annual intersociety contests. The first week of April was quite an eventful one to the Belles Lettres as several new members were sworn in, fifteen in at one time. While the judges were making their decision after the Upper Cumberland Sherwood debate, the Belles Lettres president on behalf of the society, presented Messrs. Crawford and Carr with Billfolds. It was George Moore, that provocative Lion of English Literature, who said this: “Good heavens! And the world still believes in education. Education is fatal to anyone with a spark of education feeling. Education should be confined to clerks and it even drives them to drink. Will the world learn that we never learn anything that we did not know before?” Which reminds us of this sparkling passage in Ecclesiastes: “And further, by these my son, be admonished: of making many books there is no end: and much study is a weariness of the flesh.” Jokes Mercilessly he pounded and thumped the quivering, inarticulate thing before him. At times he would ruthlessly strike it in a regular rhythmical frenzy and then, as if taking pity for a moment, would cease. But the intermissions were all too short for the racked and tortured object. Had it been able to speak it would have pleaded for a rest, but it was mute and could only endure this awful punishment in silence. When it seemed that the poor bruised frame of the persecuted could endure no more, the man rolled this manuscript out of his typewriter, folded the little portable machine, and put it away for the night. Rebecca J: --“Name the five senses” Arlie M: --“Nickles” Miss Jarmon: --“Give me the definition of a polygon.” Albert Brogden: --A polly-gone is a dead parrot. James Dewey Poteet: --“Since Henry Mallory went to the Chicago he has a gold medal for running 5 miles; a silver medal for swimming; two loving cups for wrestling; and badges for a boxing and rowing.” Hazel Thompson: You don’t say so. How did he get them? J.D. Poteet: He works in a pawn shop. Lauren O’dell: I played with Beasey Smith’s orchestra once. Miss Stanton: Oh did you? Lauren O’dell: Yes, only once. The Best Stories of Life. (1) Dormitory student to ditto: “Lend me a dollar. I’ll let you have it back next week, sure.” (2) Office boy, to Bosses’ wife: --“Sorry Mrs. Fippy, but Mr. Fippy is in conference and can’t be disturbed.” (3) Housewife, to gas collector: --“Why I sent the check for that gas bill this morning.” (4) Morning after night before: --“I’ll never, never take another drink.” (5) Central: --“Line’s busy.” (6) Girls: “Oh! Harold, You are the first boy I even kissed.” “Is he dumb?” “Dumb! Say –his wife sent him out to get a nut-cracker, and he came home with a rolling-pin.” Professor Hatfield: --“I’m dismissing you in 10 minutes early Walk easy so as not to wake the other classes.” When you were abroad did you see the Dardanells? Miss harden: Yes, I had dinner with them. A well-known minister, famous for absentmindedness, once met an old friend in the street and stopped to talk with him. When about to separate, the minister’s face suddenly assumed a puzzled expression. “Tom,” he said, “when we met was I going up or down the street?” “Down,” replied Tom. The minister’s face cleared, “It’s all right, then I had been home to lunch.” Motorgrams (1) Never put off till tomorrow the joy rides you can have today. (2) The man who hesitates gets run over. (3) There is not use locking the garage door after the car has been taken out for a joyride. (4) The fellow with the old car is lucky, if he runs into nothing but debt. (5) It is considered alright to blow your horn provided it is attached to a high-powered car. (6) Don’t count your chickens if you live near a highway. News Items Miss Shipley brought some of her pupils from City School out to “Tech” Friday morning to give us a sample of the program to be given the following night. The program at T.P.I. consisted of two numbers. The White Rabbits and The Tin Soldier. The dancers refused to give an encore saying that if we wanted more we would have to come to their program Saturday evening. Acting-Pres. Smith and Mr. Kittrell have been in Nashville most of the past two weeks in the interest of the school. Many teachers attending T.P.I. went to Nashville Thursday, April 14 to attend the State Teachers’ meeting. Pres. and Mrs. Q.M. Smith spent the week-end with Cookeville friends. Did you know the China is the most populous of all nations? A school for parachute jumpers is maintained at Lakehurst, N.j. Whales have been known to fight two days after being harpooned. In large ice cream plants the product is never touched by human hands. A pair of Zebras in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, are driven to a wagon. An Italian has made a treasure chest containing 11,968 separate pieces of wood. During a fur shortage in Europe, the skins of Shetland ponies were used for women’s wraps. Forty men and women taught to read and write is reported as result of the first five months’ activity in Peru of the league against illiteracy, organized last year. Registration of 252 people for instruction in fundamentals of the language is reported in Lima, and of 62 in Callao.

1927 April 20

  Girls’ Basketball Tournament February 24, 25, 26,1927 T.P.I. vs. Castle Heights, Tuesday Night, Feb. 15 Societies prepare for debate Question: “Resolved, That Labor Unions as they exist, are on a whole beneficial to the American people.” The century-old labor question will again be brought into forensic prominence at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute this year when the representatives of the Sherwood and Upper Cumberland Literary Societies meet in the annual intersociety debate on April 8th. The question as submitted by the Sherwoods to the Upper Cumberlands on last Tuesday reads as follows: Resolved: That labor unions, as they now exist, are on the whole beneficial to the American people.” The Upper Cumberland Representatives will announce their choice of sides of the question on February 10th. The Sherwoods will be represented by Stanley Carr, of Livingston, and Leonard Crawford, of Baxter. While the Upper Cumberlands are basing their hopes for victory on Robert Smith, of Winchester, and Paul Moore of Cookeville, Route 6. A loving cup is offered the winning team by Womack Drug Co. The society winning the cup three years in succession retains it as a permanent trophy. Home Economics Club Organized The students of the Home Economics department met and organized a home Economics Club. The purpose of which is to further the development of this department at T.P.I. and affiliation with the State organization, so as to better the conditions and increase the efficiency of the work throughout the state. Regular meetings will be held under the supervision of Miss Rose and Miss Johnson. The officers elected were as follows: President: Rebecca Johnson Vice-President: Eleanor Haile Secretary: Mary Della Pointer Treasurer: Jonny Bilbrey Spring Quarter Opens Mar. 14, instead of Mar. 4 An error was made in the general catalogue of the school concerning the date of the opening of the spring quarter, which will be on March 14 and not on March 4 as printed in the catalogue. Some additional instructors will be added to the faculty and several new classes will be organized at that time. A large number of new students are expected both at the beginning of the spring quarter and the spring short term, which will be on April 26. “Be an Optimist” A Great Success On January 28th, at the City School Auditorium, the Sherwoods and Belles Lettres Literary Societies gave the Baker royalty play, “Be an Optimist.” In spite of the rainy weather, there was a large and appreciative audience present. The play is dedicated by the author to “everyone, everywhere who is considered a grouch.” The many complimentary statements received by the young people who were in the play made them feel that they had a done a splendid service in removing any tinge of grouchiness that may have existed in the minds of those present. They appreciate the many congratulations they have received on the manner in which the various parts were presented. The characters were as follows: Isaac Golditch: Leonard Crawford Beck, His Daughter: Alberta Cassety Jimmy Maynard: W.B. Murphy Mrs. Clinton: Lena Breeding Mike: Hollis Ours Ray Hudson: Harry Burrows Miss Hull: Edith Gentry Maggie: Vallie Huddleston Ethel Peabody: Hazel Swafford Spencer: Paul Tidwell Madame Goopher: Ruth Weaver Direcotrs, J.M. Hatfield and J.E. Lane; chairman of publicity and business arrangements, Lester King; costume committee, Treva Cooper, Maurine Quarles. Palladians Entertained One of the most delightful social events of the season was that participated in by the Palladian society at the home of Miss Shelia Officer. Miss Officer, assisted by Misses Rebecca Johnson, Eleanor Haile, Elise Young, and Jessie Barnes entertained the members of the Palladian society with a card party on Saturday, January 29th, from three to five o’clock. Both were progressive bridge and rook were played, with Miss Mary Francis Whitson winning the prize for highest score in bridge, and Miss Virginia Wilcox for the highest score in rook. Delicious refreshments were served at the close of the afternoon by the charming hostesses. The party was heartily enjoyed by all. Moon-light cabaret minstrel Sponsored by football letter men and directed by Mr. T.W. Kittrell. Practice begun last Monday night January 3lst, on the Moonlight Cabaret Minstrel that is being sponsored by the football letter men. This Minstrel is being given to raise money with which to give each letter man a nice sweater. If you like a dry, uninteresting play, don’t see this Minstrel; but if you have good sides that can stand lots of laughter, don't fail to be there. The Minstrel book is a 1926 edition and this guarantees a new set of jokes. We are very fortunate in securing a very able director in the person of Mr. T. W. Kittrell. Mr. Kittrell as everyone knows, has had much experience in directing plays and al— ways makes them a great success. The following characters make up the cast: Director: Mr. Kitrell Interlocutor: B.M. Carr Sam: Oyama Winningham Melancholy: Robert Smith Pete: Gradis Winningham Jolly: Sewell Brown Buck: Merrill Hughes Clarence: Stanley Carr We promise you a good time, and we believe that you will get your money’s worth. The date and the price of admission will be announced soon. Watch for them. Be present, enjoy yourself, and help a good cause. Burritt College Co-Eds defeated by Tech Girls The Burritt Highlanders went back to the hills the other night following a humiliating defeat handed them by the Eagle Co-Eds, 45 to 2 on the local gym floor. The Preps also contributed their part of the big Tech night by winning with as much ease from Celina. High School to the tune of 45 to 22. There was very little out of the ordinary about the game itself. Had the Highlanders played a little better or the Eagles played a little worse, it might have been an exciting game, but as it was, we can only say that it was one of those uninteresting runaways. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Burritt Thompson F. Northcutt A.P. Whitson F. Bell L. Whitson C. Simrell Hale G. Johnson Moore G. Drake Substitutes: Tech-Watson, Jared, M.F. Whitson, Whitaker, McCormick Burritt – Acuff Cumberland loses to Tech 28-18 Speed of Tech Co-eds make Cumberland Five Appear Slow. It was evident from the first few minutes of play that the visitors did not have a ghost of a chance, but the Co-Eds from Lebanon kept at it and gave the gallery something good to watch at different times during the struggle. They were obviously suffering from too much and too hard basketball squeezed into too few nights. The game was far different from the great runaway that the locals staged against Burritt College just a few nights before, but they had in their possession a decided margin on the score board all during the scrap. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Cumberland Thompson F. Whitlock A.P. Whitson F. Alexander L. Whitson C. Vaughn Moore G. Smartt Hale G. Stockton Substitutes: Tech-Watson. Second game McDonald F. Sedwell Moore F. Wendell Greenwood C. Davis Matheney G. Hahnan Rich G. Gates Substitutes: Tech-Robbins, Cobb. Dr. Crume Makes Talk in Chapel On Thursday morning, January 27th, Rev. Sam Edwards and Dr. T.C. Crume, who is conducting a revival at the Baptist church, were present at the chapel exercises. Dr. Crume made a splendid talk on“Making Good in Life," which was enjoyed very much by the students. We were indeed fortunate to have a man of Dr. Crume's ability to visit our school and to give us such an interesting talk. Valentine Party On Saturday evening, February 12th, the Belle Lettres and Sherwood Literary Societies will give their annual Valentine Party for the student body. Elaborate plans are being made for entertainment and each and every student is promised an evening full of pleasure. B. G. B. U. Takes Victory from Take One could travel many a mile in any direction from any given point without seeing a slower game than the one between Bowling Green Business University and Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Both teams labored under the handicap of it being a warm night, but it was, no doubt, Tech's night off. They would work the ball down the floor, through the scanty defense of the Businessmen and then miss a crip shot. The Eagles held the visitors very. Well during the first quarter but after that they simply couldn’t hit the hoops. They had all the breaks against them, too. Time and again the oval rolled around the loop, only to fall over the wrong side. Too, a number of personals were called on the locals and most of the free throws were made good by the visitors. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. B.G.B.U H. Evans F. Sledge Robbins F. Perisho Moss C. Williams Watson G. Weems Winningham G. Seale Substitutes: Tech – K. Evans (1), Jobe B.G.B.U. – Lewis, Stamper. Tech Preps Lose to Livigston The Livingston Academy basketball team defeated the Tech Preps 22 to 18, in the former gym, about a week ago. The Preps played ruggedly due to the lack of intensive practice. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Livingston Vaughn F. Stonecipher McDonald F. Speck Moore C. H.Hinds Matheney G. Bone Rich G. D. Hinds Substitutes: Tech – Cobbs, Robbins Prep Girls Trim Carthage Displaying the same team work that has featured their play all season, the Prep girls continued their winning pace by defeating Carthage High, 47 to 7. The Preps took the lead at the beginning of the game and were never checked. Good passing and excellent teamwork featured the victory for the locals. Thompson, Jared and A. P. Whitson almost shared equal on the offensive plays. Carthage fought hard during the entire game but went unrewarded. In fact the defense of the Preps was so good that they only shot at the goal three times during the first quarter. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Carthage Thompson F. Jenkins Jared F. Hughes A.P. Whitson C. Malone McCormick G. Armistead M.F. Whitson G. Webb Substitutes: Tech – Reagan, White, Starnes. Lebanon Five Beats T.P.I. Castle Heights ran roughshod over T.P.I. in their gym Saturday night, 35 to 14. The cadets took an early lead and at the end of the first half were leading 18 to 7. Burns for the winners, was the high scorer of the game. Robbins led the scoring for the Eagles. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Heights H. Evans F. J. Martin Robbins F. T. Martin Moss C. Burns Watson G. Haley Winningham G. Dawson Substitutes: Tech – Vaughn, Cobb, K. Evans Castle Heights – Wood Algood Club The Algood boys and girls true to their home town tradition, form a band of united workers who loyally and faithfully enter into every duty that devolves upon them. This group of ten have organized into a club and elected as their officers the following. President: Jasper Harp Vice-President: Mary Della Pointer Secretary: Henry Mallory Treasurer: Odell Cornwell Senior College Class The Senior College Class were in charge of Chapel exercises Friday, January 21st. The program was planned to commemorate the life of one of the South’s greatest heroes, Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson. Because of a visiting minister, Rev. B. T. Watson, only one of the numbers was given, this being a splendid talk on the “The Life and Work on Jackson” by Mr. Benton Carr. Everyone expressed their appreciation by the splendid applause. College students have access to art collections Art loan collections valued at $100,000 for use in teaching art will be sent by the Carnegie Corporation of New York to 20 colleges in the United States and Canada. The collections consist of 1,800 reproductions in photograph and color facsimiles of the greatest works in architecture, sculpture, and painting; 50 original prints representing different processes and schools from the sixteenth century to the present; a set of textiles in 35 pieces illustrating materials and designs of different races and ages; and 200 books, many of which are rare volumes in French and German, as well as English, on the art of every period and people. Cabinets have been provided for the sets and a catalouge prepared giving a description of each piece in the collection. Seventeen colleges in the United States, representing 13 different States and 3 colleges in Canada, are the beneficiaries. All of them are smaller colleges without heavy endowments and located in places not easily accessible to metropolitan centers. Cooperative plan involves half-year alternations One semester each year for three years is spent in an industry as nearly allied as possible to their chosen line of work by students in the department of engineering at the College of the Pacific, Stockton, Calif. During the fifth year students remain continuously in college. This is said to be the only college west of the Mississippi following the co-operative plan of instruction, under which students are enabled, after the freshman year, to gain valuable first-hand experience in the work they expect to follow as a profession and at the same time to support themselves while attending college. College Friendship College friendship is a deep, quiet, enduring affection for our college association. It is affection arising from mutual esteem and good will. College friendship is essential to a successful college career, for the more friends we have in college, the more we get out of college life. It is the desire of every college student to become as popular as possible with his college friends. Popularity, being based upon friendship, depends upon the number and kind of friends we acquire. College life would be a drudgery if it were not for the friendship we establish. If knowledge was the only thing we could get at college, many students would drop out, or not even start to college that would otherwise graduate. Friendship when once established is hard to destroy. It is something you can not loose, nor can it be taken from you so long as there is mutual esteem and good will existing. A large part of our education comes through our college associates. By discussing a topic with one or more college friends we get their views, and thereby broaden our own conception. There are many ways in which we can develop friendship while in college. We can develop it by trying to appear pleasant at all times, regardless of the state of mind. Also by participating in athletics, musical clubs, dramatic clubs, college journalism, class social events, literary societies, alumni associations, and any other organization or function connected with college life. There are many religious organizations in which we may make friends, friends that are worthwhile. Friendship is one of the greatest acquirements during college life. While in college we make friends that will last throughout life. We meet the people that we will expect to help us in the time of need, and those to whom we will render aid. These are the people which we will always cherish. A student goes to college to acquire training in leadership which better enables him to render efficient service to society. Leadership is developed, principally through friendship, therefore the greater friendship is developed in an individual, the more service he is capable of rendering to society. There is nothing that will promote and increase a student’s love for his Alma Mater more than college friendship. It is not, necessarily, the college that holds a warm place in a college man's heart. It is the college friends, and sweet memories that composes the Alma Mater. There is nothing more satisfactory to an Alumnus than to relate the cherished memories of his college friends, and his Alma Mater. Many times positions are obtained through college friendship. A college graduate, when selecting some one to hold a responsible position, over which he has charge, will usually select an old college friend, because he has been tried, and he knows what his friend is capable of doing. The friendship of no one is more desirable than that of a college man, because he is to become a leader in society, a man among men, in the near future. Some of Tech’s Friends I take this means and opportunity of expressing the appreciation of the 1927 Eagle Staff to our friends who have purchased advertising space in “The Eagle.” They merit the patronage not only of our student body, but that of all friends of Tennessee Tech. Those who have reserved space to date are as follows: Williams &' Terry Bros, Jere Whitson Hardware Co, Maddux & Proffitt, Citizens Bank, Cookeville Motor Co., “33" Service Station, Murray Ball, Jewler, Womack Drug Co., Herald Publishing Co.. Gainesboro Telephone Co., Crawford Motor Co., First National Bank, Lassater & Carr, H. 8. H. West Side Drug Co., Royal Cafe, Jenkins & Darwin Bros, T. Robbins, Pressing Shop, Shanks Hotel, ]. A. Isbell, Ragland. Potter & C0., Cookeville Marble Works, Brown Shoe Shop, Apple's Place, Barnes & Clark., Ohero-Cola Bottling Co., Crawford 8: Bates Café, Sam Pendergrass Hardware Co., Coca-Cola Bottling Co, Model Laundry, T. P. I. Café, Clark Shoe Shop, Menzies Shoe Co., Baxter Seminary, Tennessee Central Railway, I. L. Loftis & Co.. The Harding Studio, Tech’s advertisers are “Tech’s, Friends.” Patronize your friends. B. M. CARR, Editor. Y.M.C.A The Y.M.C.A. met in regular meeting room Wednesday evening, January 26th, and enjoyed a most delightful program. Each man took part in the discussion with zeal. The program was as follows: School-days: Wallace Mitchell Childhood Friends: Robert Smith School-day: Wallace Mitchell College friends: Paul Moore Friends in Life: B.M. Carr There has been good attendance at the Y.M. meetings, but there are men in the “halls” who should be in the Y.M. Come next Wednesday evening and help us while we help you make the best of our time. Upper Cumberland Literary Society The Upper Cumberlands are working hard to win the Wilson Banner this year, and furthered their plans by electing Paul Moore and Robert Smith the debaters, to defend the Black and Gold, with Benton Carr and James Carlen as alternates. Both debaters are experienced debaters and the society is looking forward to a winning team. The play “Be An Optimist" given by the .Sherwood and Belles Lettres was enjoyed and appreciated by the Upper Cumberlands and we wish to congratulate the societies and more especially the cast for their splendid performance, and we hope to help further this program by presenting, with the assistance of our sister society, a play in March. Watch Oracle for announcements. Making the Assembly Hour Interesting There is one particular form of sport that seems to be especially attractive to the students in this college; it is that of cutting assembly. So pleasant is this diversion that dire threats and unpleasant publicity are called into use as a means of preventing such untoward behavior on the part of the students in general. I am wondering if in this case cure might not be better than prevention and may we not suggest that with a little forethought on the part of somebody in the planning of assembly programs they might be made so interesting that the enjoyment gained from being at assembly would overbalance that derived from being absent, thus taking from the precedent established by the school authorities. In other words, speaking in the language of the teaching profession, the work should be made so interesting that the students will want to get it instead of punishing them for not wanting to get it as it is. The student goes to assembly after two hours of intensive concentration on work requiring the greatest mental effort. Following assembly he again takes up work of the same nature for another two hours, before the time comes for any break in his work. Viewing it in this light would it not be wise to make the assembly period one more or less of a recreational nature, thus giving an opportunity for relaxation from the strain of the regular class work. Physiologists agree that inhaling fresh air is one of the best ways to refresh a tired mind or body; therefore the assembly room should be well ventilated, It should be the special duty of some one to see that this is taken care of. Singing is one of the best methods of getting this fresh air into our lungs and is a good form of exercise as well, and is also one of the best forms of relaxation. Hence would it not be a good idea to devote a greater part of the period to singing than has previously been done. There is nothing that any group enjoys more than peppy enthusiastic singing in which each one may take part. The assembly program should also be of an inspirational nature and after a few minutes of relaxation a well -planned devotional exercise would mean much to the student body; an exercise into which the one in charge had put some original thought bringing out something different from the subject-matter presented in the class room. This would mean of course that upon some one would devolve the responsibility of seeing that every assembly program was definitely provided for with a leader in charge and that leader notified in time to allow him time for special preparation, If the student does not feel that he is getting enough from the assembly programs at present to justify his attendance, he should feel some responsibility in improving them. The primary object of all clubs, societies and other organized groups on the campus should be to minister to the college life in general. What greater service could any organization render than that of presenting an assembly program that would give enjoyment and inspiration to the entire school? Let’s get busy with our special programs then, and with faculty and student body working together let’s make the assembly hour the most outstanding hour in the day. Why shouldn’t it be? It is the one hour when the entire college gets together. When this improvement has been accomplished we will no longer hear the low rumble of criticism that is now leveled against assembly by the student body in general and the monitors can throw away their little white cards and enjoy the hour with the others. – Chalk Line Agriculture Department From time to time articles will appear on subjects based on the study of Agriculture. This is the second of this series and from them we get an idea of many practical things studied in the Agricultural Department. Clean Milk and Pure Milk Milk may be clean and yet not be pure. To obtain clean milk the following precautions should be observed: First, to have a well ceiled .barn to prevent dust and other flying things from entering the milk While milking; second, to keep the barn well bedded with dry bedding; third, brush the cow and clean the udder with a damp cloth before milking; fourth, a thorough process of cleaning the vessels that are to contain the milk; fifth, to strain immediately after milking through a brass wire strainer of not more than fifty meshes to the inch and three or four thicknesses of loosely woven cotton or woolen cloth. The vessels that it is strained in should be closed well. As far as looks are concerned the above described milk would be alright for use, but it may not be pure These further precautions should be taken to make the milk pure: First, to test the cows for diseases; second, to wash the utensils with hot alkali water, and if possible expose to sunlight two or three hours; third, pasteurize to kill germs. This is done by heating to 155 degrees F. for fifteen minutes and quickly cooling to 50 degrees F. This will not develop a boiled taste. It should be of interest to the dormitory students to know that the milk supply for the lining hall comes from a source where the rules to obtain clean and pure milk are observed. Virginia Offers Extension Teaching In Citizenship Citizenship instruction, through single lectures or short courses, is announced by the University of Virginia Assistance in arranging citizenship institutes is also offered local communities or organizations by the bureau of citizenship education of the university, which will furnish information on any subject in the field of citizenship and government. A short-course meeting presents popular demand in connection with the proposed reorganization in Virginia of State and local governments, embraces a general study of city, county, and State government, and includes public health, education, public welfare, and other activities in which there is State and local co—operation. Lectures will be arranged to suit local convenience, the only expense being for travel and maintenance of the lecturer while absent from the university. Suggested Gifts for Brides Patent snore silencer and romance preserver. Dictograph for recording sleep mutterings. A self-reducer for household bills. Electric Searchlight for use in pocket larceny. Box of chalk for drawing the line. Rock crusher for biscuits. – Exchange. Letter Found by Janitor While Archie, the janitor, was cleaning the rooms at Springbrook during the holidays, he ran across a letter. It was addressed to Mr. Leonard Miller, and read as follows:“My Dearest Leonard: “I said I’d never come back, but here I am.” You know that ”I shouldn‘t mind if you find someone new.” “But I do, you know I do.” Leonard, “I'd climb the highest mountain,” if I knew I’d find you there “sitting on top of the world.” "All alone,” I’ll go where you go and do what you do, “as long as I have you." “So how come you do me like you do?" For ”I love you truly," Lew, and “I’m sorry I made you cry” “all through the night." “But what can I do after I say I’m sorry}? “Dear heart I’ll see you in my dreams,” and “Memories" of “The hours I spent with thee,” make me wonder“where my baby is tonight.” “Sweetheart,” “I wish you were jealous of me,” “as jealous as I am of you,”“Because" it makes me “Angry” to think that you may be “Cheatin’ On-Me,” “My Own” where we have “a cottage small by a waterfall,” “then I’ll be happy," and “at peace with the word.” “Honest and truly," “I love you dear,” “but if you love me I’ll never cry,” so Black-bird, By-Bye. Farewell to thee “Till we meet again.” Thy Own, “Little" Lucy. —The Broadcaster. “Why do people cheat on exams?” Because they hate to “flunk out.” That is such an illogical way of reasoning. A degree is a proof of a person’s having passed successfully certain subjects. If you receive a degree and are a hopeless ignoramus, you become a laughing stock. It is better to know nothing with no pretensions than to pretend knowledge that you do not possess. “Cheating on exams isn’t clever; it is dishonest. To steal another’s brain work is as dishonest as stealing his books. When a paper is handed in the pupil. Whose name is signed to it is swearing that the work is wholly his own. A pledge is superficial—a person who signs h 3 name has signed the best pledge he can. Giving help is as bad as receiving, if not worse. There is a double weight of dishonor on the giver—his own and that of the receiver, who could not cheat even if he wanted to without the giver. “Cheating on exams is the most cowardly of all thefts because it involves the most inordinate of all human instincts, personal pride. The cheaters want to get something for nothing. They hate to fail an exam, regardless of the fact that they have made no preparation, because they hate to make a low grade when their classmates make “A.” They are ashamed to make “F" because others will find out, but they aren’t ashamed to look over a student’s shoulder and “copy." These people can see only as far as their noses—they cannot see how momentary weakness leads to genuine dishonesty. College age is too late to cure the cheating disease. It is a mental habit that grows by leaps and bounds when endured. The Dean’s solution—to expel those who are caught cheating—is about the only course to be followed. It may not eliminate cheating, but it will help rid the school of cheaters. This measure that provides two chances .for an offender is both wise and lenient. Stressing the point may make the practice less common, and people may see the error of their ways and mend them accordingly."—The University Echo. FINALE The longest trail has somewhere its ending; The sweetest day has its twilight of gall, When the Star of our hopes into darkness descending Fades and leaves but the black and the pall. The longest river finds somewhere its ocean; The tallest peak finds somewhere the sky. The sublimes faith and a whole heart’s devotion In the ultimate crux may perish and die. The rarest of flowers has its day of decaying, When its gospel of Beauty no longer it flings To the breeze, and its wilted petals are saying: “We’re dead—but we want no angel wings!” ——Vadus Carmack Tote Fair There’s an awful lot of happiness In this old world I find, If we think well of other folks And treat ’em middlin’ kind. If we meet and everywhere, We do the best we can There's a heap of satisfaction In just “toting fair.” There’s a powerful lot of gladness In being true to men, In carryin’ out your promises Every time—and when They don’t seem to appreciate it— Why, don’t you never care, You’re more ahead than they are By just “toting fair.” There’s rules' and regulations For being happy here But honest, you don’t need them And don't you never fear— You’ll be happy and contented If you treat your neighbor square, For the best way to be happy Is to just “tote fair." ——George P. Kissberger. Formal Instruction for Deans of Women Special course for training advisers of girls and cleans of women have been established in at least 24 higher institutions in the United States, as shown by a survey conducted by the National Association of Deans of Women. Courses vary somewhat in the different institutions. In 10 institutions courses in relation to the high school only are available; in 6, courses in relation to higher educational institutions as well as to high schools are offered. In others the particular field of interest was not stated. The dean of women is the instructor in charge in nearly all the institutions, and replies from 19, indicate that credit of from one to six semester hours is granted. From 50 to 70 pupils a year receive scholarships from the Nicaraguan Government for education in foreign countries, principally in the United States. Jokes Mr. Parsons: “When was Rome built?” Flop Tallent: “At night." Mr. Passons: “Who told you that?” Flop: “You did. You said Rome wasn’t built in a day.” A bright—eyed, shabby little fellow was working his way thru a Crowded street car selling his papers. A white—haired old gentleman seemed interested in the boy, and questioned him about his way of living and his earnings. It appeared that there was a young brother to be supported. “Jimmie is lame and can’t earn much himself," said the boy. "Ah, I see," said the gentleman“That makes it hard. You could do better alone.” The shabby little figure was erect in an instant, and the denial was both prompt and indignant. “No I couldn’t," replied the boy. "Jim's someone to go home to. He’s lots of help. What would be the good of having luck if nobody Was glad? Or of getting things if there was nobody to divide with?” “Fourteenth street!" called the conductor, and as the newsboy jumped out into the gathering dusk, the old gentleman remarked to nobody in particular: “I've heard many a poorer sermon than that.” An absent-minded man was strap hanging in a tram car. He swayed to and fro and finally the conductor said to him, “Can I help you, sir?” "Yes," said the man, ”hold onto this strap while I get my fare out.” Mable Matheny: “Sometimes you appear so manly, and sometimes you are effeminate. How do you account for it?” Willis Huddleston: "I suppose it is heredity. Half of my ancestors were men, and the other half were women." Servant: “The doctor’s here, sir.” Absent-Minded Prof: “I can’t see him. Tell him I’m sick.” Clerk: “The customer asks if this shirt will shrink?” Ikey: “Does it fit him?” Clerk: “No, it’s a size too large.” Ikey: Sure, of course it shrinks.” How much did Philadelphia, Pa ? How much did Cleveland, O.? How many eggs could New Orleans, La? Whose grass did Joplin, Mo? What was it made Chicago, Ill.? Twas Washington, D. C? She would Tacoma, Wash, in spite of a Baltimore, M. D,? You call Minneapolis, Minn.? Why not Annapolis, Ann.? If you can't bet the reason why I bet Topeka, Kan? Who was it lent Nashville, Tenn, when he was nearly broke? Could Noah build a Little Rock, Ark., if-he had no Guthrie, Ok.? Would Denva, Colo. cop because Ottumwa. la., dore? For tho my Portland, Me., did love, I threw my Portland, Ore. “Is Johnny’s new dog a setter or a pointer?” “He’s neither. He’s an upsetter and a disappointment.” If we were asked what it is the most taxed thing in the world, our first guess would be – a mothers patience. “Oh, Ma, C’mere quick!” “What is it, Mary?” “Look, Johnny ate all the raisins off that sticky brown paper.” Do you discipline yourself as severely as you criticize others? Impatience causes as many failures as stupidity. An Englishman just returning to London from a visit over here, was very much impressed with our current slang phrase, “So's your old man," In telling his friends about his visit he said: ”They ’ave a very clevah saying over theya‘h jus’ now. When a man wishes to er— pun, so to speak, another friend. ’e simply says, “Your fawther is the same way. Haw, Haw! Clevah, isn’t it? Haw, Haw! A young minister, attracted by pretty Sister Grace, was dining with the family. Little Evelyn, aged 7, was talking rapidly when the minister was about to ask the blessing. So, turning to the child, he said in a tone of mild reproof, “Evelyn, I am about to ask grace.” Well, its about time," answered Evelyn. “We've been expecting you to ask her for a year and so has she.” High-School Alumni Aid worthy Students Student loan funds granted last year by the student benefit club, an activity of the Lansing (Mich) High School Alumni Association, enabled 13 girls and 8 boys to continue in school. A total of $2,250 was loaned to these 21 pupils. In the 15 years since the organization of the club 82 pupils have been aided. The principal of the fund now amounts to nearly $6,000. One per cent interest is charged until the pupil has been out of college one year, when it is expected that the loan will be repaid. Collegiate Study The Palladian's regular Monday afternoon program was made more interesting by a study of what other college’s are doing. Mary Francis ‘Whitson entertained the members with a charming selection "On Being Collegiate." ”Roommates" and the art of ”getting along” was brought out by Letha Capps. Sheila Officer gave the latest news on“Drinking and Dancing.” “Short Saying” in college life were given by Charlotte Watson. An instructive and much appreciated talk on "Being Young" was given by Muriel Gipson. Eleanor Haile concluded this snappy program by giving the very latest “Collegiate English.” Sherwood Society The Sherwood Literary Society met in the regular meeting room, January 24th, and rendered the following program: Devotional – Chaplain. Debate: Resolved, that Stonewall Jackson was a greater leader than Robert E. Lee. Affirmative, Henry Mallory; Negative, E. J. Wood. Oration –Roy Leonard. Several new men affiliated with the society. We are always glad to have new men come in and put their heart to the work and help us along. Our enrollment is increased at almost every meeting and we are continually climbing to higher things. If you are not affiliated with a society, we welcome you to ours, open heartedly. To establish 100 scholarships for rural teachers in summer schools of George Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tenn., the sum of $100,000 has been donated to the college.

1926 February 5

 The Tech Oracle BASEBALL PRACTICE BEGINS NEW TERM OPENS WITH INCREASE IN ENROLLMENT College Classes receive most of new students Since the opening of the Spring quarter on March 8th, fifty-six new students have enrolled for work at Tech, bringing the total enrollment to 303. Forty eight of the new students are of college grade. We now have 173 students in the college department and 130 in the high school. The following new students have registered this term: High School Ethel Hogan, Oliver Bussell, Eunice Barnette, Hattie Brown, Hallie Brown, Emma Carr, Vallie Carr, Nan Sewell. College Hogan W. Dudley, Edward L. Poore, Robert, Howard Turner, Loraine Huddleston, Edith Windle, Christyne McCormick, Margaret Darwin, Bernice Hogan, Myrtle Marcom, Anna Kate Scott, Clara Bilbrey, Nannie Myers, Lucile Gist, Truman Richardson, Pearl Clark, Eunice Smith, Anna Denton, Flo Donaldson, Fannie Whitaker, Notie McCormick, Pauline Sparkman, Eva Clayton, Tillman Phillips, Edith Spear, Ruth Hogan, Wililie, Mai Ray, Mrs. Elizabeth Hammer, Lydia Wheat, William Hammer, Lena Holman, Mary Breeding, Anna Ruth Grimes, Bessie gentry, Leonard E. Crawford, Effie Judd, Beecher Frazier, Francis Dunavin, Gladys Bohannon, Louise Cornwell, Della Lemons, Lester King, Eleanor Haile, Paul J. Moore, Rose Dow, Thelma High, Adina Crowder, Herman Langford. EUROPEAN TOUR THE REWARD OF ORATORY A personally conducted tour of Europe during the summer of 1926 is offered this year, instead of a cash prize, to the seven finalists in the 1926 national oratorical contest, according to recent announcement of the director. These student contests are financed by representative newspapers in the United States to promote better and more intelligent citizenship. Last year, it is estimated more than a million and a third highschool boys and girls participated in the state contests leading up to the final test in Washington City in June. A somewhat similar contest, but entirely independent was conducted in 1925 in Mexico. The contest this year has assumed an international character not only in the award of a personally conducted European tour for the seven successful contestants in the United States, but independently conducted national contests will be held in () Canada, England, Mexico, France, and Germany, culminating in meeting in Washington next October of the national winners. Each nation’s contestant will discuss the governmental contribution of his own country. The director of the contests in the United States is also international director. In the United States the subject, as heretofore, will focus on constitutional government. The seven finalists will sail from New York City, July 3, and all expenses for their tour expect for passport and personal expenditures will be met by the 26 metropolitan newspapers sponsoring the project. SHERWOOD DEBATERS CHOOSE NEGATIVE SIDE OF QUESTION On Wednesday, March 10th, the Sherwood debating team, composed of Leslie Myers and Tim Huddleston announced that they would defend the negative of the question for the annual intersociety debate which is: “Resolved, that state boards of arbitration with compulsory power should be established throughout the United States to settle labor disputed in public utilities” The affirmative team is Douglas Robbins and Charles Davis who represent the Upper Cumberland Literary Society. The debate will be held on Friday evening May 14. INTERESTING NEWS FROM THE EDUCATIONAL WORLD Almost two-thirds of the student body of Transylvania College, Kentucky, earn by their own labor, all or part of their college expenses. A school for the training of colored librarians has been established at Hampton Institute, Va., through the cooperation of the Carnegie Foundation. One year of college training is required for entrance. A loan fund to amount to not less than $10,000 for assisting students in four Class A normal schools in Alabama, has been established by the Birmingham News. The fund is to be administered by the presidents of these institutions. TENNIS TO BE MADE INTERCOLLEGIATE SPORT AT TECH The department of Athletics announces that a certain sum shall be spent for the promotion of tennis during the spring quarter. This will make it possible for Tech to compete officially with other colleges in tennis for the first time in the history of our school. The audition of tennis as a regular sport is made possible by the increased returns from the Basketball Tournament held this year. Mr. Passons, Treasurer of Athletic Council, reports that the Athletic Association began the school year with $777.00, in the treasury. At present the amount is $920.00. The officials of the Association plan to make baseball as nearly self-supporting as possible by collecting from every person who witnesses a game. This plan will be difficult to enforce until we have a fence erected around the playing field. In view of this condition all book agents and other individuals who possess extraordinary ability as collectors are asked to be ready for mobilization at a moment’s notice. Recent legislative action will greatly increase the income of the University of Porto Rico. A Federal Bureau of Education, similar to the United States Bureau of education, for the purpose of collecting and diffusing information respecting education generally, is urged for Australia by the Australian Teachers’ Federation. SQUAD HAS FIRST WORK OUT ON TUESDAY Three Men Return From Last Year’s Team The initial practice for the baseball season of 1926 was held Tuesday afternoon, March 16th. The men trying out for the team and their positions are as follows. Pitchers: Moss, Denny, Lewis, Gates and McDonald. Catchers: Winningham and Mayfield First Basemen: Moss, Gates and Richardson. Second Basemen: Joiner, Richardson and Whittaker. Short Stop: Watson, Little and Stringfield. Third Basement: Davis, Lewis and Little. Outfielders: Brown, Hogan, Gill. Moore, Gates, Davis and Stringfield. The letter men from last year’s team are: Watson Winningham and Denny. These three will form the nucleus of this year’s squad. Not much is known of the newcomers with the exception of Moss, who has a brother now playing with Brooklyn, and who comes to us well recommended. Let us hope so at any rate, for a lack of pitchers of good caliber has been one of Tech’s greatest troubles in her baseball teams of the past. Among the others who will bear watching are: Lewis, Gates, Brown, Little, Davis, Whittaker and McDonald. The 1926 schedule follows: Baseball Schedule April 2 –Monterey –here. April 5 –Defiance College, Ohio. –Here. (Pending) April 7-8 –Bryson College –There. April 14-15 –Bethel or Ogden –Here. April 23-24 –Bethel or Ogden –There. April 27-28 –Cumberland –There. May 1—Open –Here. May 7-8 –M.T.T.C. –There. May 10-11 –Cumberland –Here. May 19-20 –M.T.T.C. –Here. REVIEW OF BASKETBALL SEASON In recapitulating Tech’s basket ball season just past, it will probably be proper to begin with those who made it what it was –the Squads. Whether the season shall be termed successful, or not, the fact remains that any period of athletic activity is largely what a team makes it, that the results obtained can only be measured in terms of the effort put forth. For that reason as the whether or not the season was successful only the players themselves and probably the coaches know. I know no better way present () ing the squads other than by giving a brief critical sketch of each member of their merits shortcomings and possibilities for the future as I see them. I shall first review the men’s varsity and then take up the Co-eds. First and foremost, of course, should always be the captain. And the captain of the squad of ’26 is no exception. Jobe was not only the highest point-maker in almost every game on the schedule, but also played the floor in great style Jobe has in all probability played his last game for Tech, and I am sure the student body joins heartily in wishing him “good luck” wherever he may go. Moss at center was good on close shots and worked the floor nicely. With a little more careful handling of the ball he should develop into a mainstay for the Tech team of ’27. Lewis, stocky and fast forward, was also good on close shots. His floor work was rather spotted at the start, but constantly improved as the season progress. He should also rate the squad of ’27. Winningham, regular forward at the start of the season, was forced out in the Cumberland game of Jan. 27, and was unable to engage in the remainder of the schedule. He is likewise a good floor worker and excellent on short shots. Watson, a regular at running guard to begin the season, was also forced out very early because of sickness and was unable to return to the fold. With better luck next year he should easily merit a regular berth on the varsity. Davis, the man in the hole, filled the place vacated by Alcorn of last year’s team in a very efficient manner. He has a tendency to be drawn too far out at times which he will no doubt corrector for the future. R. Robbins running guard, handles the ball very well and works the floor in a fairly creditable manner. However, he seemed unable to locate the basket this year a fault which he will also have to correct. M.L. Robbins, light and fast forward work the floor fairly well and is fairly accurate on his shots most of which were made at a distance. He needs experience, however, to improve his game from all stand points and to correct a fault of too little mixing. Denny, guard and center, has the makings of a future Tech basket ball star. He now is fairly accurate of his shots, but needs more experience to round out of his game. Carr, guard and forward, is also full of possibilities. He is now fairly accurate on close up shots, but needs to improve his floor work. The varsity won from East Nashville “Y” Bethel College twice, Ogden College and Bowling Green Business university. They lost to Cumberland twice, Ogden B.G.B. U.M.T.T.C. and the Guaranty Trust Collegians of Cincinnata. The Collegians, who beat Vandy eight points and the Ramblers twelve, were only able to increase their margin over us by two. It is needless to say that Coach Overall Handled the team in a very creditable manner. The Co-Ed Squad Miss Lucy Whitson, captain and center of the Co-ed team, was in all probability the most valuable member of her team, as I have said before, the captain should be. She worked the floor well was good on her shots, and in most instances was tall enough to get the tip off she is undoubtedly one of the best centers in the state. Miss Shipley, fast forward, was the high scorer of the season for the Co-eds; worked the floor well, and in fact had all one could wish for in a girl basket ball player except height. She also must rate as one of the best in the state. Miss Shanks, another fast forward, worked the floor fairly well, but was not so accurate as Miss Shipley in her shooting. She needs more experience to round out her game. Miss Moore without doubt is one of the best guards we have ever had. Her only trouble seems to be an inability to break fast. With more experience, however, she should be able to correct this fault. Miss McKeel, guard and forward worked the floor in a very creditable manner, but her shooting was very inferior to her floor game. She should also improve with more experience. Miss Annie Pearl Whitson substitute forward has the makings of a future Tech regular. She is fast, but needs considerable experience to improve her game from all angles. Miss Starnes fitted very nicely into the guard position this year. Like the majority of the others she needs more experience to improve her game, especially in getting the ball away quicker. The Co-eds won from Cumberland, Nashville “Y” twice and Logan College. They lost to M.T.T>C. Cumberland, Carson New-man, and Maryville. Miss McClanahan has built up to a great extent a system that speaks big things for the future teams of Tennessee Tech. The basketball tournament sponsored by Tech and held March 4, 5, and 6 was a great success from all standpoints. Fourteen visiting teams were the guests of Tech and had ample opportunity to become acquainted with the line of work Tech is endeavoring to accomplish. Many of the players have already signified their intention of starting their college career with this institution. Alpine won the tournament and Livingston academy was a runner up. And everyone had a big time. UPPER CUMBERLANDS AND PALLADIANS The first program given by the Upper Cumberland and Palladian Literary Societies this term for the new students was very interesting. It consisted of the following numbers: Things we would like to see Rose Dow Scenes from an Art Gallery Cave Man Charles Davis Cave Woman Eunice Allen Mother Ursula Rubye McKeel Execution of Mary, Queen of Scots Elsie Young John Smithe Robert Smith Pocahontas Mary Ellen Shanks Colonial Elise Gregory and Mayme Gibson Flapper Thelma McCormick Also some costumed clog dances were given: University High Clog Thelma McCormick and Lillian Pointer Old Man Pauline Hudgens, Rozelle Pendergrass and Llewyn Johnson Dixie Amy Shipley Many new students were present and after the program games were played and delicious refreshments were served. SPECIAL MUSIC IN CHAPEL Wednesday morning of each week the music department tries to put on something of musical interest and value as well as entertainment for the student body. At present the different kinds of voices are being illustrated. The first voice illustrated was the Mezzo-Soprano, by using victrola records of different arts. Wednesday morning, March 10, the student body was delighted to have as guests, Mrs. Howard and Mrs. Carlen. Mrs. Howard, a pianist of unusual ability, gave “Love Dream” by Liszt and an arrangement of the “The Arkansas Traveler” by Burg. As an encore, she gave “Juba Dance” by Dett, a rollicking clog dance. Mrs. Carlen a lyric soprano of note gave several beautiful songs, “Love’s in my heart” “My Lindy Lou” and her favorite “The Bird and the Babe.” She gave “The False Prophet” as an encore. Tuition fees in the state secondary schools of Czechoslovakia are graded according to the incomes of the parents of pupils. THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Printed by The Herald Publishing CoEntered as second class matter at the Cookeville Postoffice, Cookeville, Tenn. EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief Bryce D. Stone ‘26 Assistant Editor Edward McKay ‘27 Assistant Editor Nola Quarles ‘27 ASSOCIATE EDITORS Athletics M. Douglas Robbins ‘27 Wit and Humor Robert Ensor ‘28 Exchange Elizabeth Ensor ‘28 Classes Martha Sedivak ‘27 Society Shelia Officer ‘29 Alumni Hazel Wall ‘27 Faculty Advisor Thos L. Passons BUSINESS Business Manager Lee S. Darwin ‘27 Assistant Bus. Mgr. J. Fred Terry ‘27 CIRCULATION Circulation Manager J.D. Miller ‘27 Asst. Cir. Manager David Terry ‘29 Asst. Cir. Manager Willis Huddleston Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI MONTHLY TACT Tact is the secret of getting along with people. You will make more friends in a week by getting yourself interested in other people than you can in a year by trying to get people interested in you. If there are two or three of your acquaintances that you can’t get along with, it may be their fault; but if there are a dozen or more individuals who antagonize you continually, it is fault. Always remember that the other fellow’s actions are governed by what you do. For example, if someone calls you a liar you will respond in a certain way but if that same person calls you a good fellow you will respond in an entirely different manner. In brief do not push and command but lead and suggest. Abraham Lincoln would have a hard time getting into a modern university. Perhaps this is the reason there are so few Lincoln’s coming out of the big schools. Ten units of summer school or normal school study, at least six units of which must be strictly teacher-training study in the principles, theory, or practice of teaching are now required in addition to high school graduation, before a resident of Nevada may obtain a third-grade certificate. An extensive school building campaign is in progress in a number of counties in Alabama. At present more than 100 buildings many of them handsome structures of brick or stone, are in process of erection through aid granted by the State Department of Education. COLLEGE SERVICE AND WORTH A college which serves its locality better than does the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute can hardly be found. Each year hundreds of city and rural students are enrolled in this institution and encouraged to remain in school and complete a course leading to some profession. T.P.I. is growing and it is growing rapidly. More of the real college spirit is apparent each term. The standard of scholarship is steadily being raised. Work done in this institution meets the most exacting requirements of larger and older colleges. The students who later enter other colleges find their work recognized without question. T.P.I. means something to the state of Tennessee and particularly to this Upper Cumberland Region. Were it not for the existence of T.P.I. most of the young men and women in this section of the State would never advance beyond high school. They would have a less clear conception of the advantages of a college education, and consequently, they would feel like inducement to go to more distant parts of the State in search of a college within their means. This year the faculty is redoubling its efforts toward selling T.P.I. to itself and to the people who can be benefited by T.P.I. Direct encouragement is being given to students in the high school graduating classes in schools throughout this part of the state. A live “Go to College Campaign” has been spiritedly inaugurated by T.P.I. this year. As a result of this campaign many people are getting acquainted with T.P.I. and learning of its growth and educational significance. Chief among the ways of getting in touch with new friends is the plan of giving a free subscription to the “Tech Oracle” to all members of high school graduating classes in the many high schools in this district, T.P.I. wants higher education to be the aim of every high school graduate Fourth year students in over thirty schools are receiving the “Tech Oracle” regularly. Approximately three hundred such students are becoming better acquainted with T.P.I. in this way. In the next issue of this paper there will be a comparison of the courses of study and expenses of this institution with those of other institutions in the state. There frequently arise questions as to expenses and entrance requirements that cannot be well answered in a general discussion. If such questions are sent to this paper, we will gladly print the answers and each subscriber will have advantage of the information. A RECENT VISITOR Miss Louise Forman the Student Secretary of the Southern Baptist Convention gave a very inspiring as well as interesting talk at Chapel Tuesday morning, March 9th. The keynote of her address was “Today and Tomorrow with Jesus Christ.” Using this as a foundation, she in her own undefinable way showed us how essential it is for us to spend our “Todays and Tomorrows with Jesus Christ.” RULES FOR THE LIBRARY 1. A fine of 5c a day will be imposed for each day that an ordinary book is kept over time, the fine to be paid when the book is returned. If the book is lost, the borrower shall pay the cost of the book the fines accumulated at the time the loss is discovered. 2. Reference books cannot be taken out until 4 o’clock and must be returned at 8 o’clock the following day. 3. Books must be signed out for if not taken out of the library. 4. Magazines, newspapers, and other books on the reference shelf must be replaced when read. 5. Serious offenses such as the tearing of magazines or theft of books are punishable by suspension or expulsion of the offender, who shall also be required to replace the material. 6. Any book may be recalled at any time by the librarian. 7. Talking when necessary must be in a whisper 8. Students must have special permission to use the stacks or search for materials in magazines 9. Reference books cannot be kept longer than one hour in the room. 10. 10 if reference books are not returned by eight o’clock a fine of 10c an hour will be imposed. 11. Fiction may be kept out 7 days. Twenty-eight male instructors for boys at the Pennsylvania Industrial Reformatory have enrolled for the study of pedagogy in extension classes conducted by the Pennsylvania State College. Eighteen educational surveys in eight States –Kentucky, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Tennessee Virginia, and West Virginia –were made by the Interior Department, Bureau of Education, during the fiscal year 1924-25. FACULTY MAN WINS CONTEST A very interesting “Know Tennessee” contest was held at the City School building, Saturday evening, March 14th. The contestants were: Dr. W.S. McClain, Grover C. Boyd, J.M. Hatfield and Paul Moore, Dr. McClain and Mr. Boyd were selected from town, Mr. Hatfield was chosen from T.P.I. faculty, and Mr. Moore from T.P.I. student body. The winner of this contest was Mr. Hatfield who represented Cookeville in the divisional contest at Nashville. Think and Grin Martha: “Does skating require any particular application?” Sewell: “No, arnica or horse linement –one’s as good as the other.” Robert Smith: “But say, what must I do if they ask me to sing?” Douglas Robins: “Do? Why sing of course, it’ll be their own fault.” Mr. Passons (jocularly): “Do you know anything worse than a giraffe with a stiff neck?” David Terry: “Yes sir.” Mr. Passons: “What?” David: “A centipede with corns” Mr. McClanahan: “In what battle did General Wolf when hearing of victory cry ‘I die Happy.’” Houston Haile: “I think it was his last battle.” Clarence Duke: “My brother sure was a dumb guy.” Frank Hall: “How’s that?” Clarence Duke: “They had to burn down the school house to get him out of the first grade.” Miss Harden: “I have a ford. What car have you?” Rich Friend: “A Packard.” Miss Harden: “Well that’s a good car, too.” Experienced Employer: Have you ever done any night work? Jobe: Yes, sir; I courted for two years. Charles Davis (to passing motorist): Hi, mister, I’m going your way! Motorist: So I see, but I’ll get there before you do. He (having just kissed her): Ah! That was indeed a triumph of mind over matter! She: Yes, I didn’t mind because you don’t matter. Doctor (to fair patient): You certainly have acute appendicitis. Danie Wright: Oh, Doctor, you flatter me. Teacher (Mr. A.W.): Your answer is as clear as mud. Martha Sedivak: Well, that covers the ground, doesn’t it? Mamie Gibson: My dear, you have made a bad job of putting your paint on this morning. Charlotte Watson: Yes, honey, I’ll admit I’m somewhat of an amateur –you see, I haven’t been putting it on as many years as you have. Pauline: Paul, if you don’t stop I’ll scream –I’ll call mother! Mother! Mother! Oh, my goodness, Paul here she comes. I never dreamed she was at home. He (after a quarrel): I think our lips are parallel, don’t you? She: I don’t know. Why? He: Because they never meet. Agitated Old Lady: Quick, my daughter is drowning. Save her and she shall be your wife. R.T. Little Wait till she rolls over. I want to see her face. TENNIS TALK At last tennis is to be recognized as a minor sport at Tennessee Tech Plans are on foot to put tennis at Tech on a sound basis, and to provide recreation for at least fifty students who might not otherwise get it. the fact is that there are many more who could be encouraged to take part but for lack of courts. Tech needs at least five good courts and should have them in the near future. However, we must make out with the ones that we have for this year, and partly with that end in view a set of rules have been made out and approved of by the coaches, the manager, and the president. It is to be hoped that every person who engages in tennis will do his utmost to abide by the rules, and thus help pave the way for more and better tennis at Tech. a small beginning in the way of a tennis team is to be attempted this yea, but plans as to its extent are not as yet complete. Miss McClanahan has been appointed director for tennis and will personally supervise all tennis activities. A copy of the rules follows: 1. Each player shall furnish his own racket and balls. 2. Each player shall wear heelless rubber soled shoes while using courts. 3. Each player or group of players shall obtain a permit from the attendant in charge to use the courts at a certain hour. 4. No player or group of players shall use the courts more than one hour each day unless the courts are vacant. 5. The attendant in charge shall not issue permits in such a way as to provide a monopoly of the courts by any players or set of players. 6. Doubles must be played when more than four are waiting. 7. The courts may be used after three o’clock on each day in the week except Saturday in Sundays . on Sundays they may be used any time after eight A.M. On Sundays not at all. 8. A tournament to decide the singles and doubles champions for both men and women shall be played the fourth week end in each year after the courts are officially announces as in conditions 9. The number eligible for this tournament shall be; Men’s singles –eight; Men’s doubles, women’s singles, and doubles and mixed doubles –four. The eligibility shall be determined as follows: For the first three week-ends after courts are declared in condition all participants in tennis activities shall be watched in action by the coaches. The coaches shall then confer and select an eligibility list on the merits of the players seen in action. This list will compose those eligible fo the annual tournament. 10. All entrants in the annual tournament shall pay an entrance fee of fifty cents payable at least two days before the tournament begins. 11. The three coaches of Tech shall pick a team to represent the school after and according to the playing shown in the annual tournament. 12. The attend in charge will be appointed by the Tennis Director and manager and shall be subject to their authority Carolyn McClanahan, Tennis Director, R.M Smith, Athletic Director P.V. Overall Ass’t Athletic Director, M.D. Robbins, Tennis Manager, Q.M. Smith, Pres. Tennessee Tech. INTERESTING NEWS FROM THE EDUCATIONAL WORLD A six weeks’ European tour for the study of representative newspapers in Canada, Great Britain, and on the Continent of Europe will be conducted next summer by the University of Wisconsin course in journalism Classes will be conducted on shipboard, and the students will be addressed in a number of places by representative foreign journalists. The platoon or work-study play plan of organization has been adopted by one or more public schools in 101 cities in 33 States. In addition, two private institutions, Carson and Girard Colleges in Pennsylvania, are operated on the platoon plan. A students’ residence or hostel, was recently dedicated with impressive ceremonies in Montevideo, Uruguay. The hostel is sponsored by a group of intellectuals to furnish a group of intellectuals to furnish home influences for students and to offer a center for the intellectual life of the community. To encourage thrift many savings banks in Czechoslovakia give to each new pupil in the elementary schools a passbook with a beginning credit of 1 krone. The schools of the country celebrate thrift day and impress upon the children that saving insures happiness and that industry and thrift mean prosperity for the individual and for the national –school life. PATRONIZE ORACLE ADVERTISERS THE POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS By Mary Crenshaw Burns stated his special aim “to sing the sentiments and manners he felt and saw in himself and his rustic compeers around him in his and their native language.” He succeeded nobly in his aim for no poet has better sung the songs of the Scotch than he has. He is the great poet of rustic life and the representative Scotch poet. In a rural theme he is entirely in his element. He exhibits neither affection nor condescension and reality. He sings sweetly of his life and that of his fellow peasants in his realistic pictures, as well. He deals with the rustic beliefs of his own people, that is the poor class of country people in Scotland, and tells of their customs and idiosyncrasies. He did not have to look for themes they were all around him and he wrote as the spirit moved him. The most dominating of Burns characteristics is his individuality. He stands apart from all other writers; he defies classification. The writers; he defies classification. The preceding English poetry of the eighteenth century did not give the slightest prediction of the possibility of any one resembling him. He is a wild flower that grew up all by himself. There is only one Robert Burns. However numerous faults may be Carlyle says of him. “He is an honest man and an honest writer. In his success and his failures., in his greatness and his littleness, he is ever clear simple, true and glitters with no lustre but his own.” One of Burns’ best known long poems is “The Cotter’s Saturday Night” This poem is written in the Spenserian stanza. Although it is written in modern English it has a sprinkling of Scottish or Scott English terms. This is a true picture of Burns’ home. And it does justice to the sentiments and manners of the Scottish peasants in their more hallowed relations. It is one of the most beautiful poems in the English language describing home-life. A picture of Scotch life very different from that found in “The Cotter’s Saturday Night” is “Tam O’ Shanter.” This is a humorous tale of an inn and drunkards. It treats of the superstition of the people and especially of the witch who caught hold of the horse’s tail. But the poem is not all humorous for Burns takes time to give the lesson: “But pleasures are like poppies spread, You seize the flower, its bloom is shed; Or like the snow fall in the river, A moment white –then melts forever;” Another of his humorous poems is “The Address to the Devil.” This is a comic sketch of the doings of the evil personality. Two of his poems which show a sympathetic and beautiful under standing of Nature are “To a Mouse” and “To a Mountain Daisy.” In these he shows a love for all living and all lifeless things. The “Daisy” falls not unheeded under his ploughshare; nor the ruined nest of that “wee, cowering, timorous beastie,” cast forth, after all its provident pains, to “thole the sleety dribble and cranrench cauld.” But even more human than these is “A Man’s A Man For A That,” for it deals directly with mankind In this burns sounds the trumpet of democracy when he says, “It’s coming yet, for a’ that, That man to man, the world o’er, Shall brothers be for a’ that.” In discussing Burns’ poetry we can not forget his songs. He has written some of our most beautiful songs. Carlyne says, “By far the most finished, complete and truly inspired pieces of Burns are, without dispute, to be found song his “Songs.” He has a rich assortment of popular songs which well express the Scottish sentiment and emotion. Some of the most beautiful and best known are “Auld Lang Syne,” “Flow Gently Sweet Afton,” “Coming Thro the Rye,” and “John Anderson, My Jo” are both tributes to friendship, while “Flow Gently Sweet Afton” was written to the highland lassie, “Mary.” No one has written a finer tribute to Burns and his poetry than Oliver Wendell Holmes in the following stanza: “The Lark of Scotia’s morning sky; Whose voice may sing his praises? With Heaven’s own sunlight in his eye. He walked among the daisies, Till through the cloud of fortune’s wrong. He soared to fields of glory; But left his land her sweetest song And earth her saddest story.” THE CHARLESTON The Ashland Collegian student weekly of Ashland College, Ohio, deplores the moder dance and sees the country “Charleston Mad.” The editorial follows: “Among the worst in its dire effects of all the crass banalities that has invaded our indigenous dolichocephalic civilization is the essence of death, ‘the fateful and destructive Charleston. This dance not only contains all the moral depravity of which other popular dances have been incriminated by the zealous moralist, but to this one has been added the demonstrated destructibility of property. While ‘twenty-eight couples from as many different states –vie from each other with intricate steps, hops, and wiggles in the Charleston,’ and wiggles in the Charleston,’ and ‘After several hours of the manual labor and bends of the now famous dance, four couples were adjudged the best from their respective sections’; bans are put on the pernicious and ruinous dance in Ashland, Delaware, and other cities. “Besides shaking the buildings down in which the dance is performed it might be said that it also shakes the character of the participant. “If this is a civilized and progressive nation, why revert to an aboriginal tom-tom method of amusement? It is a travesty on contemporary intellectual life that such savagery should be introduced into a country which is manifestly the leading Christian country of the world. Why the nation that sailed the first successful aeroplane, produced the telegraph, perfected the radio, and made the world’s greatest resources accessible, should be enslaved by the f e t I s h I s m of Africa’s dark continent is inconceivable.” –The New Student Class attendance will not be compulsory during the second semester for senior students of superior scholarship in the Kansas State Agricultural College. This is an experiment at this institution, and if successful it is probable that the privilege of voluntary attendance will be extended. EXCHANGE COLUMN We are glad to have the following papers on our exchange list. All are placed on the Newspaper rack in the library. Tech students are urged to read and compared them with the Oracle. The Oaks Bowdon State Normal Bowdon, Ga. The Bethany Collegian Bethany College Bethany. West Va. The Broadcaster, Alcoa, Tenn. The Orange and Blue Carson Newman College, Jefferson City, Tenn. The Emory Wheel, Emory University Emory, Ga. The Purple and Gold, C.H.S., Clarksville, Tenn. The Central Star, Dickson County High School Dickson, Tenn. The Cardinal, Ogden College Bowling Green, Ky. The Hume Fogg High School, Nashville Tenn. Side Lines M.T.T.C., Murfreesboro, Tenn. The Pine Branch Vaidosta, Ga. The Babbler, David Lipscom College, Nashville, Tenn. The Bayonet, Tennessee Military Institute, Sweetwater, Tenn. The Sou’wester, S. P. U., Memphis, Tenn. The Brackety, Ack, Roanoke College, Maryville, Tenn. The Brackety, Ack, Roanoke College, Salem, Va. The Central High News, Central High School Nashville, Tenn. The Bethel College, Russellville, Ky. The Technique Georgia Tech, Atlanta, Georgia The Log Cabin Bethel College McKenzie, Tenn. The Chalk Line E.T.S.T.C. Johnson City, Tenn. L.A. Fax, Livingston Academy, Livingston, Tenn. Famous Sayings “I don’t know where I’m going but I’m on my way.” –Columbus “Keep the home fires burning.” –Nero. “The first hundred years are the hardest,” –Methuselah. “Keep your shirt on.” –Queen Elizabeth “Don’t lose you head.” –Queen Mary. “Treat ‘em rough.” –Henry VIII. “The bigger they are the harder they fall.” –David “It floats.” –Noah “You can’t keep a good man down.” –Jonah. “I’m strong for you, kid.” –Samson. --The Boston Evening Transcript Soft Jobs A barber in Moscow Horse doctor in Detroit Killing the fleas on goldfish Killing flies off a snow man. Sweeping leaves from a hall tree. Digesting the hole of a doughnut. Being night watchman on a sundial. Captain in the Swiss Navy, Manager of an ice house in Africa. Keeping the dust off Niagara Falls. Driving a street sprinkler in Venice. Assistant lineman for a wireless company Bathing suit censor on the Sahara desert. Keeping the grass cut at the North Pole. Humorous editor of the Congressional Record. Coaching the Glee Club in a deaf and dumb school. --The Bethel Collegian. THE ENGINEER Who comes with pencil sharpened keen, With profile long and sober, mlen, With Transit, Level Book and Tape And glittering axe to swat the state? THE ENGINEER Who sets the level, bends his spine Squints through the glass along the line, Swings both him arms at rapid gait, Yells, “Hold that Goldamed rod up straight?” THE ENGINEER Who raves and snorts like on insane Jumps in the air and claws his mane Whene’er he sees a scraper take A whack at his most cherished stake? THE ENGINEER Who says he’ll charge an even ten For stakes destroyed by mules and men While on all fours he tries in vain To find the vanished stake again? THE ENGINEER Who saws the air with maddened rage And turns with hate the figured page And then with patience out on Joint Ties in another reference point? THE ENGINEER Who calls it your unrivalled gall Where’er you kick for overhaul, And gives your spine a frigid chill Whene’er you spring an extra bill? THE ENGINEER Who deals with figures most profuse And tells you solid rock is loose, That hardpan is nothing more than loam, While gumbo is lighter than sea foam? THE ENGINEER Who, after all, commands our praise In spite of all his peculiar ways, While others harvest all the gains That spring from his profile brain? THE ENGINEER --The Clemson Tiger. Is This Education? I can solve quadratic equations, but I can’t keep my bank balance straight. I can read Goethe’s “Faust” in the original, but I cannot ask for a piece of bread in German. I can name the kings of England since the war of the roses, but I do not know the qualifications of the candidates in the coming election. I know the economic theories of Malthus and Adam Smith, but I cannot live without my income. I can recognize the “left-motif” of a Wagner opera, but I cannot sing a tune. I can explain the principles of hydraulics, but I cannot fix a leak in the kitchen faucet. I read the plays of Moffiere in the original, but I cannot order a meal in French. I have studied the psychology of James and Tichener, but I cannot control my own temper. I can conjugate Latin verbs, but I cannot write legibly. I can recite hundreds of lines of Shakespeare, but I do not know the Declaration of Independence, Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, or the Twenty third Psalm. The Sou’Wester. “We Strive To Please” Suppose we rouge; suppose we dance, Suppose we smoke and swear, Suppose we wear our dresses short And bob our golden hair. Suppose we stay out late at night, Drink cocktails –wine and gin, And do the Charleston with the ‘gang’ Til the slipper soles are thin. Suppose we let you kiss us In a parked car late at night, And do a lot of petting That we know is not quite right. Well –we thought you wanted petting And we thought you wanted “punch,” So we did the naughty nice things Just to be one of the bunch. But don’t you know –Oh, boys o’ mine. We’d get as big a thrill Out of watching clouds go rolling by While perched upon a hill. With daffoldils ad daisies A growing at our feet, A learn from lips of one we love That life is very sweet. We’d even wear the crinolines Our grandmothers used to wear, Read poems from old Tennyson And plays from Moliere. If we thot you wanted romance We’d give you what you crave But if you yearn for “burlesque” Then we have to dance and rave. For we simply strive to please you In the best way that we know, For you are e’er the audience And we the actors of the show! --The Bayonet. BELLES LETTRES LITERARY SOCIETY There was a call meeting of the Belles Lettres Literary Society on Tuesday afternoon, March 9th, for the purpose of electing officers for the Spring term. The following officers were elected: President Mary Tom Johnson Vice-President Marie Peters Secretary Juanita Montgomery Treasurer Ethel Anderson Chaplain Dixie Brown Sg’t-at-Arms Ruth VanHooser Critic Mary Cummins

1926 March 20

 THE TECH ORACLE THE NINTH YEAR BEGINS School opened for work Thursday, September 18, 1924, with about three hundred enrolled. Almost one hundred of these are college students. This doubles the number for last year. In the Freshman class alone this year there are sixty. Many of these are new students also. The Freshman High School is not represented in T.P.I. any longer. The High School department contains about two hundred students this year, practically the same number that were her last year. This looks good considering the fact that the seventy-five or more who would have composed the Freshman class is lacking. The faculty is to be commended on the manner in which they handled the matriculation this year. There was a place for every one, and almost every one found their place. There were no long lines in which a student had to stand and wait but once started they were passed rapidly from place to place and the ordeal was soon over. Immediately after class work began the classes and literary societies organized for their year’s work and all is now in full swing. SOPHOMORE COLLEGE The Sophomore College class met recently and elected the following officers; President, Jack Morrison. Vice-president, Fowler Clark. Secretary, Wilsie McGee. Treasurer, Robert Alcorn. Sergeant-at-arms, C.B. Johnston. Reporter, Alex Shipley. Plans were discussed for a marshmallow toasting to be given by the class. No definite time or place were agreed upon, but it is expected that the party will be given at Lake View some time in the near future. Our class is composed of several former members of the Technical High School class of 1923, with addition from various other high school’s in the state. Many of those who started with us are missing now, but in spite of the losses, the class still retains that loyalty to our Alma Mater and to the high ideals that has ever borne us onward and upward. Our only cause for lamentation at present is the fact that there are only four girls in a class of twenty. SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL The Senior High School class met Wednesday, October 1st. The officers for the year were elected as follows: Raymond Robbins, president. Harry Draper, vice-president. Dimple Greenwood, secretary. Charles Cox, treasurer. Louis Draper, class reporter. The class adjourned to meet following Wednesday to elect rest of the officers. The class is planning a great year. FOOTBALL TEAM Hill-Captain-End Hunter is a seasoned veteran having received five of the coveted football “T’s”. He weighs 155 pounds and is 5 feet 5 inches tall. Opposing teams soon learn that is useless to run plays around his end, for he is sure to bust ‘em up.” He is also one of the main cogs in the interference. This will probably be Hunter’s last year of football but his value to T.P.I. in his five years’ service cannot be approached. Puckett –End Dewitt has received three letters for football services rendered at Tech. Puckett weighs 160 pounds and is 5 feet 8 inches tall. Puckett is expected to have his best year in the present campaign and if his duties as “scrub” coach do not require his attendance with that organization, he is expected to make all the trips with the varsity. Winningham –End Although Winningham is new among the Tech gridders, he is expected to be a great help to the team both offensively and defensively. He weighs 165 pounds and is 5 feet 11 inches tall. He seems to be especially adept at catching passes and is expected to do the receiving in the greatest system Tech has ever had. He is also a good defensive man. Miller –Half Jimmie Miller is the veteran of the rear squadron, having served four years with the Tech gridison warriors. He is 5 feet 9 inches tall and weighs 164 pounds. Miller’s fleetness of foot, coupled with his never needing drive make him one of the most dreaded “pigskin packers” in this section of the state. He not only can carry the ball on the long end runs, but last year showed a great ability at line plunging. He is expected to have a great season. Watson –Half Eddie has had only one year’s experience in football, but despite this great drawback he is making a fine showing. His giant legs give him a powerful drive and a few more weeks of training should make him a finished footballer. He weighs 174 pounds and is 5 feet 11 inches tall. Russell –Quarter Russell, better known as “Dutch,” is the midget of the squad and is in danger of being mistaken for a mascot. Dutch hails from Corinth Miss. Having played three years with the strong Corinth 11 S. Despite his slightness of stature he is a great player being a fast runner and possessing a great stiff arm. He calls a fast game, and with the cooperation of his fellow teammates should be able to drive Tech through an undefeated season. He weighs 142 pounds and is 5 feet 6 inches tall. Jobe –Fall Jobe hails from Clarksville, having played two years with Clarksville High. Although he weighs only 155 pounds and is 5 feet 8 inches tall, he carries the greatest drive and a great speed as shown by any member of the team. He not only shines on the offense, but is one of the most deadly tackles on the squad. Barring injuries, Jobe is doomed to be the most valuable man on the Tech squad during the present season. Brynum –Tackle Another Mississippian also hails from Corinth. He has played four years and was captain of the team in ’23. Brynum is a large man and has shown great prospect, but most of all he shows a determination to win. He has shown a great defensive power and also a great power at paving the way for the offense. He is a good punter and will be entrusted with the kicking duties when he is in the game. His experience plus his natural power is expected to make him one of the greatest defensive players Tech has ever had and from present indications he will live up to all expectations. He weighs 170 pounds and is 6 feet tall. Cahoon –Tackle Cahoon, a hefty youngster, hails from Chattanooga, having played with the strong Central High School for the past four years. Cahoon is a large man and carries a great power being a deadly tackle and a good blocker. He has shown great prospects and is expected to be a great aid to Tech during the ensuing season. He should be able to stop most offensive star which Tech will meet and he is expected to be found fighting throughout every game. Cahoon will probably carry the kick-off and the field goal responsibility, being good at both tasks. He weighs 185 pounds and is 6 feet tall. Starnes –Tackle Starnes has received two letters for football service and is expected to make his third a still greater year Starnes is a man who puts every ounce of his energy into the game, and will doubtless be a great aid to the team. He weighs 173 pounds and is 5 feet 10 inches tall. Jackson –Guard Jack has played three years with the Tech squad and is an able performer. He has been of great aid in the past and is expected to have a still greater season this year. He weighs 175 pounds and is 5 feet 8 inches tall. LaFevre –Guard Buff has played four years with the squad. He is a strong man barring injuries should have a good year. He weighs 188 pounds and is 6 feet 2 inches tall. Clark –Center Clark is entering upon his second year as a Tech gridder and is expected to be a valuable man. He is playing his first year at the “snapper-back” position being a guard by profession but is fast developing into a fine center. He is the lightest man in the line weighing 150 pounds. It has been said by able critics that Clark got more tackles than any other man on ’23 squad. Suggs –Center Suggs, a new man, hails from Clarksville having played two years on the Clarksville High team. He is a big man and although he arrived late and little is known of his actual ability, he is expected to be a valuable man. He can be used at center or guard and should go good at either position. He weighs 176 pounds and is 5 feet 11 inches tall. Overall –Coach Overall started his football career at Murfreesboro where he played with Middle Tennessee Normal. He played with the undefeated Vanderbilt team of ’21, and is accredited with having stopped the great Georgia team when it seemed they were making a mad rush toward victory. He started his career as coach with Livingston Academy and his success there caused him to be employed by T.P.I. He at once started a system of clean athletics, and is fast putting T.P.I. in line with other colleges in the athletic realm. He has received the greatest material ever offered a Tech coach and is expected to put out winning teams in all three lines of sports for the following year. Darwin –Manager Lee Sadler Darwin is proving himself a faithful manager. He and the coach have arranged an attractive schedule and he will undoubtedly do his best to keep Tech in the front. Hudgens –Physician The football squad has found, in Ed Hudgens, a faithful and untiring attendant. He is ever ready to do anything in his power to comfort a Tech gridder and is fast becoming a deadly poison to the much dreaded charley horse. Ed is a dandy first aid man and is due much credit for keeping the men in good physical condition. Present indications point to the strongest year in Tech football history. The largest squad that ever reported to a T.P.I. coach has been found out this year. Approximately thirty-five men are daily battling for positions on the team. The entire varsity will average 167 pounds and every man has had at least one year’s experience. Coach Overall predicts a great season and with the aid of the entire student body together with the patriotic services of the members of the squad, should turn out a great team. FRESHMAN COLLEGE The Freshman College class held its regular meeting on Wednesday, October 8, 1924, in the English room. There is an enrollment of sixty. The officers were sworn in, and the constitution was read so that each member of the class might become familiar with it. A committee was appointed to make plans for an opossum hunt for this term. The Freshman College class met October 1, 1924, and elected the following officers. President Ed. Hudgens. Vice-president, Effie Judd Secretary Lillian Pointer. Treasurer, James Miller Sergeant at arms, Lewis LeFevre Cheer leader, Merrill Hughes Sponsor Miss Elsie Jobe Reporter Willard Johnson This is one of the best classes that has ever entered the college depart()ment of Tennessee Polytechnic. The interest and school spirit that have been manifested by every member of the class indicates that we have a successful year ahead, and that this class will do much in the future to raise the standard of the institution in every phase of its work. Sherwood Society The Sherwood Literary Society met in its regular meeting room on Monday afternoon, September 22, for the purpose of organizing for the Fall term. The following officers were elected for the Fall term: Gilbert Hatfield, president Walter G. Birdwell, vice-president C.W. Davis secretary. Chas B. Johnson, chaplain Oliver T. Bohannon, critic. Bryce D. Stone attorney general. Dewitt T. Puckett sergeant-at-arms Upon being installed in office the following program committee was appointed: Alton G. Adams, Jack Morrison and Herman Langford. The Sherwoods are very fortunate in office the following program committee was appointed: Alton G. Adams, Jack Morrison and Herman Langford, The spirit of the society is usually good for so early in the year. We are looking forward to one of the most successful years in our history. A great work is before, but every true Sherwood is resolved to do his best. All new students are cordially invited to attend the programs of the Sherwood society. We advise all new students to visit both societies before joining either. We make no extravagant claims of superiority, but we feel confident that the Sherwoods will always maintain the high standard set in previous years and push forward with renewed zeal to the yet unconquered heights of permanent supremacy. Palladians and Upper Cumberlands A delightful social function was given Friday night. September 26, when the Upper Cumberland and Palladian Literary Societies entertained for the new students. Instead of the regular litrary program, given every Monday by the respective societies, a very unique original stunt program was given arranged by Miss Elsie Jobe, Palladian sponsor assisted by a number of Palladians and Upper Cumberlands. An interesting feature of the evening entertainment was a “Get Acquainted” game, the boys and girls lining up and introducing themselves. Much fun was derived from this unusual feature. The hall and auditorium were decorated in society colors and delightful refreshments were served. THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Staff Bryce D. Stone ’26 Editor-in-chief Eleanor Haile ’27 Asst. Ed.-in-chief Associate Editor Dewitt T. Puckett ’25 Wit and Humor Shelia Officer ’29 Social Amy Shipley ’28 Class Hallie Ray ’25 Faculty John J. Bell ’26 Exchange Hendon Johnston ’26 Athletic Thos. L. Passons English Business Department James D. Miller ’27 Business Manager Jack Morrison ’26 Assistant Subscription rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY THE ORACLE With this issue the Tech Oracle begins its second term as the official publication of the Tech student body. This paper was created near the close of the school last year, and with the limited time then at hand the staff of 1924 could not hope to establish a paper that would carry with it all the prestige and influence that rightly belongs to a school journal. But in spite of the handicap under which they labored our illustrious predecessors met their task with such courageous and concentrated efforts that, within the short space of one month, the Oracle was established on a firm working basis and had so endeared itself to both faculty and students that its continuation was assured. The foundation has been well laid but to the staff of 1925 falls the colossal task of continuing and improving the work so nobly begun. In beginning we realize the enormity of the work before us, but we are encouraged by the fact that no more loyal and enthusiastic student body ever existed than that which now rallies around our Alma Mater. We ask the cooperation and support of every loyal Tech student in our climb up the hitherto unexplored heights of scholastic journalism and in return we assure you a first class paper, representative of every phase of our school life –a paper by Tech students, for Tech. Henry L. Barger of the class of 1924 is the Republican nominee for the lower house of the State Legislature from Rhea and Meigs counties Mr. Barger spent three years in Tennessee Tech. He came here a stranger. He left with the highest regard of the people of Cookeville, and of his fellow students Mr. Barger was active in the local Sunday school work and for a time taught the young men’s class at the Church of Christ. He was a good student and in student activities had no superior. He repeated elected to the Y.M.C.A. presidency; was often president of the Upper Cumberland Literary Societies and twice represented that society in the annual debate being a member of the winning team of 1023 the first Upper Cumberland victory in six years. He was manager of the football team in 1923 and was pronounced one of the best the school ever had. Mr. Barger held other responsible positions and made good in them all. The editorial staff of this paper is democratic but it isn’t too narrow to appreciate character and ability. Hence we do not hesitate to express the opinion that Henry Barger would be an ornament to the legislature. He is publicity and privately clean; he industrious and thorough; he is cool, calm, and deliberate. The Oracle hopes that the General Assembly of 1925 will number Mr. Barger among its members. SEND IT IN If you have a bit of news— Send it in; Or a joke that will amuse— Send it in A story that is true— An incident that is new— We want to hear from you— Send it in; If it’s only worth the while— Nevermind about the style— Send it in; ISBELL MARTIN A marriage of much interest was that of Miss Mary Isbell and Mr. William H. Martin, which occurred at Jackson on October 2 while the bride was on a visit with friends. Rev Mr. Jones pastor of the Methodist church at Decaturville, where the bride taught last year, was the officiating minister. Only a few intimate friends of the young couple were present. The bride were a brown satin trimmed in fur with a small brown hat and accessories to harmonize. Mrs. Martin is well known in this city, in the daughter of Mr. W. L. Isbell and was born and reared here. She is a graduate of T.P.I. and has been a very successful teacher since she finished school. Mr. Martin is a prominent lumberman of West Tennessee. They will reside in Battle Springs where the groom owns a plantation. Immediately after the ceremony they left for a Southern motor trio. BELLES LETTRES SOCIETY The Belles Lettres Literary Society is progressing nicely, under the leadership of the president, Miss Clyde Jackson. The Belles Lettres and the Sherwoods had a very interesting joint program on Monday following the opening of school, which was enjoyed by all, especially the music rendered by Miss Ona V. Ellis and Mr. Merrill Hughes. We are glad to announce that we have had eight very promising young ladies to become members of the Belles Lettres Literary Society. Their talent will add much to the society and help make it a success in the future. We are glad to have so many of the old members back and the spirit in which they are entering the work indicates a most successful year. Our second program was very short because of the business we had to attend to. The following officers were elected: Vice president, Ona V. Ellis Chaplain, Daily Starnes Sergeant-at-arms, Arrie Bohannon. Critic, Myrtle Bullock Program committee, Ruby Barksdale, Lola Massa, Alyen Martin Fine officer, Velma Hill The officers that were elected in the Spring for the Fall term were as follows: President Clyde Jackson Secretary, Mabel Cassetty Treasurer, Lucy Whitson. PALLADIAN SOCIETY The Palladian Literary Society launched fort into the new year with a crew of eager, energetic workers, waving high the Wilson Banner and shouting “Onward.” Under the leadership of Miss Amy Shipley, president, they have sailed forth into the clear seas with high hopes and aspirations. Work was begun immediately by putting on a drive for new members, which has been a great success. A number of wide-awake, enthusiastic, new students have already have been admitted to the society. The weekly meetings have been held regularly and each time a delightful program has been rendered. One of the best programs being that given on the occasion of the joint meeting of the Palladians and Upper Cumberlands. On Friday evening, September 26, a Get Acquainted party was given in the main building by the Palladians and Upper Cumberlands for the entertainment of new students. The halls and auditorium were decorated in black and gold, the society colors. A stunt program was the principal feature of the evening. It was full of “pep” and fun. In entering upon this new year the enthusiasm of the Palladians seems unbounded and it is the aim and aspiration of the society to be worthy of the banner it now holds and to strive earnestly to make this a most successful year. Y.M.C.A. The Y.M.C.A. met in the education room of main building on Monday afternoon, September 22, 1924. At this meeting Bryce Stone served as temporary chairman and John J. Bell as clerk and the following were elected as officers: Jas. D. Miller, president. Ban McDearman, vice-president Ed Hudgens, secretary and treasurer. C.W. Davis, reporter. More interest and enthusiasm were shown at this meeting than at any meeting in the history of the organization, evidenced by the fact that every boy was present who rooms at the dormitories and when the house was open for new members came with their dollars and had their names enrolled. Every one pledged their support to this organization this year, and as a result of this cooperation we expect much effective work this year. FACULTY CORNER We are glad to give this part of our paper over to our faculty. We shall from time to time publish such matter as the various teachers will hand us. This section will be called “Faculty Corner.” The editor of this department hereby invites the teachers to furnish plenty of material o make this the best department of all. President Smith says, “With the publicity the ‘Oracle’ has there is no reason why it should not be one of the best school papers.” Mr. Kittrell is so busy electioneering for President of Third Year College class that he does not talk much about other things, but has been kind enough to give the following encouragement: “The Tech Oracle promised to be the greatest school paper in the state. I am judging by the issues that have come out.” The Dean, who is always ready to help a good cause, gives the following thoughts about the work at Tech: The Tennessee Polytechnic Institute has opened what promises to be the most prosperous year in its history. The enrollment with the first year eliminated is not much below what it was last year, including the first year. The college department is larger by far than in any former year. “The percentage of students coming from outside of Putnam county is much greater this year than any year in the past. “The institution is beginning to take on a real college atmosphere being dominated now by mature students. The general tone of the school is excellent. “Students are being enrolled almost every day and there are others yet to come. In fact, after Christmas and during the Spring term, the enrollment will be swelled by many dozens. Those who have watched the growth of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute from 1916 when it had 120 in the 8th grade 169 in high school, and 11 in the college department, realize the real rapid growth and the material change in the student body. The school has been a going institution from the beginning, and is still such. Many high schools have been established in the Upper Cumberland section which are now becoming feeders for this and other institution, and with the awakening of the educational institutions throughout the state, a general increase in the enrollment will take place from year to year. “The future of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute is bright.” Miss Huffman, who was with us last year, has demonstrated that she means nothing but hard work. (Proof: Read the sign on the door of D.A. Dept.) Miss Rose, who was a former student of Tech, has not become accustomed to the surroundings well enough to express her opinion. However, from her ability to police the halls at noon we judge that she is endowed with that wonderful gift called “discipline.” Y.W.C.A. The services of the Y.W.C.A. are being carried on in a very pleasing manner. We have morning watch every morning and on Wednesday evenings special programs are given. A number of the new girls have become members and every one hopes to make this one of the most successful years the T.P.I. association has ever had. Plans are being made to send a number of delegates to the Southern conferences at Blue Ridge, North Carolina, this year. Our conference representatives of last year, Misses Clyde Jackson and Auby Scott, reported a wonderful trip and received instructions which they hope to use in improving the local organization during the coming year. The Y.W.C.A. cabinet consists of the following girls: President, Clyde Jackson. Vice-president, Gorda Carrington. Secretary-treasurer, Auby Scott Program committee, Clara Bilbrey, Ruth Quarles, Mabel Cassety. The Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. conduct Vesper services in the auditorium of the main building every Sunday afternoon at five o’clock. Everyone is cordially invited.

1924 October 15

 Tech Oracle Prospects Bright For Tournament All High Schools Must Be Members of Tenn. Association of Secondary Schools. The annual district basketball tournament for the Upper Cumberland section of Tennessee will be held at Cookeville, under the auspices of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute on February 23-24-25. High schools, in order to be eligible, must be bona-fide members of the Tennessee Association of Secondary Schools. The tournament will also be limited to Senior High Schools. The girls’ tournament will be held during the week following the boys’ tournament. The Tech basketball tournaments have been very successful during the past. It will be recalled that the Alpine High School team, winner in the Tech tournament last year, also won the state championship, which carried with it a free trip to Chicago, where the National Basketball tournament was held. It is expected that the 1928 tournament will be even more successful than those of the past. Coach P.V. Overall is now completing arrangements for the boys’ tournament and the student body will be expected to cooperate in arranging for the reception of the visiting teams. Tech students who wish to avail themselves of the opportunity to attend these tournaments are urged to buy season tickets. Boost the tournaments! Eagles Lose Hard Fought Game To Y.M.C.A. The East End Y.M.C.A. of Nashville can now claim the honor of having won from the Eagles. On January 29th these two strong teams met for one of the hardest-fought games of the season. The game started rather slowly, but soon began to speed up, and after the first few minutes of the tussle both the teams showed real fighting spirit. The “Y” warriors took a six-point lead before the Eagles could find the basket. Tech handled the ball aplenty, but missed shot after shot letting the visitors take the lead throughout the game. Tech made many substitutions, and the players did not get warmed up to the game like they should have in order to the victory. Williams played a good game at standing guard. He played throughout the whole game: Morris Lee Robbins led the scoring for tech with five points. Buntley was the outstanding man of the whole game. He played the floor like a veteran general, scoring with eleven points. These Married Men Know When traffic lights show red The thing to do is stop, I know— But when friend wife sees red, The safest thing to do is go! ‘Seventeen’ Example of America’s Best Humor. Palladians and Upper Cumberlands Will Present Comedy at City School Auditorium. The many readers who have been lured back to “the days of real sport” by Booth Tarkington’s tale of youth and summertime, “Seventeen” will be able to see these charming characters in real life February 17th. And those who have not read the book will find represented a characterization and a story that has taken rank with “Tom Sawyer” and “Huckleberry Finn,” only brought up to the moment of dress suits and racing cars. It is a laughable and yet a very human account of the trials of a typical American family struggling with its 17 year old son in the throes of his inspired love affair. How William Sylvanus Baxter (whose part will be enacted by Lauren O’Dell) lives in terror of his 10-year-old sister, Jane, who sees and reports everything he does; how the gay but fickle “visiting girl” completely turns his head, and how his lack of a dress suit seems to make life a vain and colorless thing, form the comedy of the play as well as of the book. The scene of “Seventeen” is laid in a community, not very small but not very large, in which there live children and fathers and mothers. We all know that Billy Baxters and Janes and fat Lummoxes and Lois Pratts (God forbid!) live about us. In fact, they are this near to use: they are right under our own skins. You and I were of the group when we were younger or older. We may not want to admit it but we know that is true just the same. Perhaps your hero was not the same as Billy’s Sidney Carton. Perhaps it was Napoleon or Frank Merriwell or the romantic figure of a man who drove the hook and ladder. More likely it was Sentimental Tommy. Didn’t you go about for days and days imagining you were Tommy? Or Ivanhoe? Or Buffalo Bill? Of course you did! And there is another reason why “Seventeen” appeals irresistibly: It is a dramatization of the boyhood and girlhood of the audience. For this, the fine art of Booth Tarkington is responsible. Perhaps you don’t want to be reminded of your youth. Perhaps you want to be old and sophisticated and scorn to stain your cheeks with weak tears. Perhaps you won’t like “Seventeen”, but you will at least be firmly convinced that it is fine, clean, wholly American fun. February 17th –don’t forget the date! Speed. Mrs. Jarvis –Merrill is a very quiet dresser, is he not? Dannie Wright –Not so very; but when he gets home at 2 A.M. he is the quietest undresser you ever heard of Furnace Room Club is reorganized at Tech Liberalism is Keynote of New Organization for Intellectuals at Tech. We are happy to announce that the Furnace Room Club, which was the intellectual center of T.P.I. in happy plight of the Intelligentria has been very pitiful since the passing away of this famous old organization, and now that it has been reorganized, the young Radicals, Anarchists and Bolsheviks at T.P.I. may thrive and prosper (intellectually) as they did in the days of the long ago. The initial meeting of the new organization was called during the lunch hour last Monday. Haney Judd, while eating a ham sandwich, field the air with a fusillade of trisyllables, urging a higher type of intellectual life on the hill. “What do we know about Russia?” he shouted. “Nothing, nothing! I repeat it, gentlemen, NOTHING! Let us dedicate our lives to Communism and Free Love, and let us name this organization ‘The Disciples of Lenin and Trotsky.’” Mr. Judd was at this juncture pushed off the garbage can. His oration, while a success from a rhetorical standing, was a psychological failure. Estel Swack, a chicken leg in one hand and a limburger cheese sandwich in the other, delivered the following address: “Ladies and Gentlemen: We may be Anarchists and we may be Bolsheviks, but we are the disciples of nobody. In order to be pioneers, I suggest that we call this organization the ‘American Association for the Advancement of Companionate Marriages.’” Mr. Swack’s address made a hit, and a vote was taken. However, the ayes and nays tied. It remained for Houston Haile to untie the knot with one of the most inspiring flights of oratory ever uttered by the tongue of man. His address is too long to be printed here, but he concluded with these stirring words: “Let us dedicate ourselves to the cause of Liberalism. Let us martyr ourselves for the cause of Right. We are neither Republicans nor Democrats, Laborites nor Socialists. We are non-Conformists. This is the Age of Reason gentlemen, and we must be the pioneers of the Upper Cumberland. In due respect for those noble men who formed this organization in 1920, I move that we rename it the Furnace Room Club –for it is here that we will hold our meetings and it is here that we will expose the lies and the shams of Twentieth Century life.” Mr. Haile’s address received a thunder of applause. The organization was renamed the Furnace Room Club, and a committee, consisting of Lauren O’Dell, Charles Draper, and Henry Ferrell was ap()pointed to draft a constitution. Willis Huddleston was elected president. Ewell Watson, vice-president, Josh Kent, secretary, Aaron Huffines, door-keeper, and Raymond High, honorary Chief Mogul. The meetings will be held at irregular intervals. F.R.C., Reporter. Debaters Chosen For Annual Clash Upper Cumberlands Will Present Question for Debate Sherwood Will Choose Side. The Literary Societies have chosen representatives for the annual debate which will be stages during the early part of April. Ewell Watson and Albert Brogden will speak for the Upper Cumberlands; Milton L. Aeuff and Vadus Carmack will speak for the Sherwoods. The question will be presented soon by the Upper Cumberland Literary Society and the Sherwoods will have choice on sides. This debate is an annual affair which, during the past, has aroused considerable interest. The prize at stake is the Womack Loving Cup for Effective Debating. This cup counts one point (two in case of a tie) toward the Wilson Banner that is awarded each commencement to the society doing the most effective work throughout the year. The cup goes permanently to the society winning it three times in succession. The Sherwoodshave a one-year lein on the cup at present. Both societies are confident on winning. However, it seems probable that one of the teams will lose. Which will it be? Let your preference be known. The higher the spirit, the better will be the debate. “Making Daddy Behave” is Presented at Sparta. The cast of “Making Daddy Behave” invaded foreign territory last Thursday night by presenting this popular farce to a fairly large and appreciative audience. The trip to Sparta was made rather eventful on account of wrecks and punctures. The entire cast managed to get back Sparta band sponsored the presentation of the play. Many Cookeville friends were presented. Exchanges “You have a well arranged paper.” –Central High News. “The Merry-go-Round column of the “Tech Oracle” is especially interesting.” –The David Lipscomb Babbler The “Library Notes” in the “Tech Oracle” are most entertainingly written up.” –Ward Belmont Hyphen. “The Tech Oracle is a fine paper. We notice in the line-up of the T.P.I. football team the names of Jobe and Suggs former Clarksville students.” –The Purple and Gold “The Merry-Go-Round of the Tennessee Polytechnic ‘Oracle’ is clever.” –Ward-Belmont Hyphen. Winners In “Eagle” Popularity Contest The Popularity Contest which came to a head last Friday at one o’clock, was hit –very hot. Some of the races were close, very close, and some of them were regular landslides, thanks to the efforts of the campaigners and stump speakers. The following students will grace the “Popularity Page” of the annual this year. Most popular girl… Juanita Montgomery Most popular boy… Leonard Crawford Prettiest girl… Avo Norrodd Most handsome boy… Earl Suggs College Wit… R.T. Little Mekkest… Edwin Burt Most Intellectual… Vadus Carmack Most original… Ruth Leonard Jolliest… Hollis Ours Most studious… Mary Della Pointer Most Talented… Lauren O’Dell Most gallant… Hollis Ours Most Cheerful… Frank Hall Most prompt… Theodore Hammer Neatest girl… Elsie Young Biggest Talker… Mayme Gipson The Rover By J.M.A. Many times in life you have had the blues. Ah, that’s nothing but a good man feeling bad! I have roamed over many states, gone thru many schools, talked, conversed, and argued with professors. But now my days are filled with pleasure and merry-making. I sit in my window at midnight and wander over fields and hills, watching the rows grow. Palladian Chapel Program On January 26th the Palladian Literary Society gave an interesting program in chapels which dealt with the life and works of Robert Burns. The program opened with a Burns song: “Flow Gently, Sweet Afton.” The following girls appeared on the program: Marguerite Hargis, who gave a general introduction to the subject of Burns’ poetry, touching especially upon his popular songs: Elsie Young, who gave an interesting sketch of Burns’ life; Hazel Wall, whose subject was “The Love Poetry of Robert Burns,” and Mary Della Pointer, who gave an analysis of “The Cotter’s Saturday Night.” The program was concluded with the song –“Auld Lang Syne.” The Upper Cumberlands will give the Lincoln Day program on Feb. 12th. Who could be so little as to hide behind a woman’s skirt Prof. Tallant –Pauline, use the word “satiate” in a sentence. Pauline Hudgens –Sehila went to the Beef Growers’ barbecue last night, and I’ll satiate quite a lot! Personalities Of The Seniors Seniors are noted for two things: age and erudition. They are also noted for their modesty, and for their courtesy to Freshmen, but these matters are of passing consequence. Modesty and courtesy diminish after graduation, but each June adds another gray hair to the head of a Senior, and every day –nay, every hour—is an addition to his or her, store of knowledge. The 28 Seniors of T.P.I. are a diversified crop. They may be summarized briefly as being the most talented group ever assembled under the blue canopy of heaven. Every range, variety, degree, and condition of genius may be found among them. If the Freshmen or the Sophomores wish to observe great men and women in action, they have but to look on. The Seniors are quite well known for their magnetic personalities. They paralyze the faculty, and wit the Freshmen. They have it all. If you don’t believe it, observe the way a Senior walks, the way he acts, the way he talks; you will see it written all over him (or her). Especially observe their dignified behavior in chapel, and learn a lesson in public etiquette. The Seniors expect to perform great works to do great wonders in the world. To list a few: Mayme Gipson expects to be the first woman governor of Tennessee, and while in office she expects to have the Evolution statute wiped off the books. Leonard Crawford, if his dreams come true, will be the National Secretary of the Y.M.C.A and will probably make many speeches to the Tech student body in the years to come. Frank Neely will be pastor of the Little Church around the Corner, in New York City. Frank Small will be president of the Tennessee Central Railroad. Pauline Hudgens expects to be a missionary in Korea. Hugh Dowell will be sole owner of the Cumberland River, and Juanita Montgomery will be president of Vassar and an ardent suffragist –more famous, even, than Carrie Chapman Catt. Lee Leonard, after winning a Ph.D. from Harvard, a P.D.Q. from Chicago and an X.Y.X. from Liepsic, will settle down as a professor of Sanskirt in some great American college. Flora Montgomery, Mattle Mitchell, Elise Gregory, Marguerite Hargis and Bessie Mae Carr will also enter the teaching profession in whatever specialty they later decide on. Alvy Starnes, Vadus Carmack, Raymond High, and Percy Neely expect to be aviators, and they are planning now to make the first nonstop flight to Jupiter. Their plans will be called “The Spirit of ‘28’”, Allen Scott will also go along as photographer for M.G.M. News. The Seniors naturally feel optimistic as to the future, and since mankind owes –or will owe –so much to them, their reserve, and dignity of manner is nothing but natural. If it were not for the Seniors, the world would be in a sorry plight indeed. All hail! To the Seniors of ’28! (P.S. The Seniors of ’28 are fortunate. Since most of them are coming back next year, they will have the pleasure of being Seniors twice!) --A Senior What Can A Man Believe? When the American reformist runs out of anything else to say he collects a pile of rotten tomatoes and proceeds to hurt them at the colleges. Every magazine of any importance features a monthly diagnosis of the ills which beset us. They say that college is a farce, that college professors are boneheads, and that collegians are fools, lounge lizards, anarchists, free lovers, nincompoops, noddies, dumb-bells, zanies, dumskulls, boozers, libertines, Philistines, and jackasses. The preachers say we are atheistic radicals, hell-bent for hades. The intelligentsia say we are blockheads who believe in the ol’ time religion. The financiers say we are idlers, learning everything except how to make a living. The professors of commerce say we are potential Captains of Industry learning how to become millionaires. The practical man says were are being coddled, whereas, like the bantling, we should be cast upon the rocks. The College President says we are learning how to live, and how to live more abundantly. The opponents of co-education say we are learning how to get married. The Believers in co-education say we are not learning to get married. And so on and so on, ad infinitum. The problem is a difficult one, and we are moved to reiterate with Mr. Bruce Barton, “What can a man believe?” Library Notes In “The World’s Work” for February is an interesting article titled “An Adventure in Common-Sense Education,” by Hamilton Holt. This article concerns an experiment that is now being carried on at Rollins College in Florida. It heralds a new day in the field of education, for Rollins College is a pioneer in a field which, at present, is in dire need of pioneers. The system of instruction which is used in Rollins College, the comparative freedom of the students, and the ideals which are being worked out by its founder, Hamilton Holt, will prove to be provocative reading matter for every person connected with school life –whether in the capacity of student or teacher. Read it! “Harpers,” for February has an article called “Blue Sky Laws for Teachers,” by Harold W. Brecht. Mr. Brecht hits the nail smash-bang on the head, and proves, rather conclusively that the elementary school teachers of the country are bossed around too much by the country Puritans. More freedom for the rural teacher is the keynote of this article. The Five-foot Shelf of Harvard Classics, the Complete Works of R.W. Emerson, the Library of World’s Greatest Essays, and the Library of the World’s Best Literature are recent valuable additions to the library. Poet’s Corner Those Love Inspiring Darts By Ruth Leonard If we should question our deer instructors concerning a vital interest, How we may to our thoughts give utterance, Or how we may win affections or admiration— Each one would present a response of his own creation. The Botanist would have an answer like fragrance of perfume, “Say it with flowers,” would be his advice, I presume. “Short and to the point,” a Business teacher would say, Liking to apply everything in his own way. A history teacher would answer, “Study Cleopara’s disposition and you may gain Admiration enough to be written in record of fame.” A manual Arts instructor may present his point of view, “Spread a canopy to sun and dew Where love may find a home beneath their tented shade.” A physicist may offer his theory for our aid, “By means of law of gravity (attraction of force)s.” He would probably reply “Develop a radiating personality.” The advice of an English instructor: “By means of eloquent phrases”, Might satify our curiosity. The Domestic Arts instructor might explain in such a way, “Love is like thin silk,” she might say, “So attire yourself in distinctive apparel, Thereby enhancing your lovliness.” A Physiologist might only like to add this: “When all the fondness and admiration you attain, May you thru it all that sense of equilibrium retain.” A Test in History By Bradley Cassetty Four o’clock, and a pain to me, For we all had a test in historee. “Take your seats,” Quoth Mr. Hatfield, (And then the fun began) “Who was David Wilmont, And where did he die?” (“A Democrat; Penn.” Said I). The second one was easy, The third one was not; The fourth was the hardest Of the whole bloomin’ lot. My seat became harder— The questions did too, Would the torture never cease? Would he never get through? “What’s the Capital of Nashville?” At last he inquired, “N”, said I, and with a gasp He expired! The Mysterious Moon Charles C. Swack Last night as I looked from my window, I saw the Moon at its rise; I watched it pass from the hills of the East, Into the beautiful skies. I watched it pass through the treetops, Its rays at times I could not see, But again it would come in sight Just as bright as it used to be. The cirrus clouds were flying fast, But the Moon was traveling slow; And when the clouds had all gone by The moon was still in flow. According to the Freshman’s Intelligence Test— An Oxygen is an eight-sided figure. “Nero” means absolutely nothing. “Homer” is a type of pigeon. Ulysses S. Grant was a tract of land upon which several battles of the Civil War were fought. A quorum is a place to keep fish. A vegetarian is a horse doctor. Radium is a new kind of silk. Henry Clay is a mud treatment for the face. Mussolini is a patent medicine. Flora and fauna are a couple of chorus girls. --Western Reserve Red cat. Provided “Girls have a right to dress as they please?” A maiden remark, with vigor. Rut some of them lack the nerve. And some of them lack the figure! Subscribe for the Oracle.

1928 February 1

 Tournament Girls, Welcome to Tech! “It Happened in June” Presented by Upper Cumberland and Palladian Societies, March 25th The Upper Cumberland and Palladian Literary Societies will present "It Happened In June" at the city school auditorium March 25th. This play is a beautiful story abounding in mirth and action. It will be directed by Mr. Pinkerton who has had considerable experience' in directing dramatic preformances. The cast has been chosen, and is one of ability and reputation, some of which have appeared in a number of plays in Cookeville. The cast is as follows : Bettie Branson, pretty young owner of the Shady Grove Store —Samie Ruth Womack ; Susie Crundle,—Betty's best friend and nearest neighbor —Ann Elizebeth Bracey ; Nell Crundle, Susie's 11yr. old sister—Pearl Cornwall; Mollie Jessop, cook for the Bransons—Jessie Barnes; Evalina Scroggs, homeliest girl in the village —Milly White, Charles Atkins, a young visitor in Shady Grove —Eugene Collier, Randy Stewart, his friend who sells insurance —Donald Moore, Jim Pritchett, a village character with nothing to do in particular —Hendon Johnston, Jarvis Sneed, the meanest man in the country and president of the Shady Grove Bank —James Carlen. Tournament visitors you have seen us. How do you like us? Come back to Tech when you can stay longer! MEETING OF ALUMNI EXECUTIVE COUNCIL The Executive Council of the Alumni Association met on February 7th with the following members present: Bryce D. Stone, President, Hazel Wall, Secretary and Treasurer, Leonard Dunavin, Rebecca Johnston, Odell Cornwell, T. W. Kittrell. Plans were discussed for establishing two scholarships, one for boys and one for girls, to be paid out of the dues of the Association. These scholarships will probaly be awarded to students who make the highest average in the freshman year at Tech, but definite plans will be worked out later. The president and secretary (Continued on Page 6) Tournament Begins Thursday Evening, Twelve Teams are Entered. Miss Genevieve Collins, Peabody College, Will Referee. Twelve teams have entered the Girls, Tournament to be held Feb. 24th, 25th, 26th,. This is the first year that T. P. I. has held a tournament for the girls, although the boys' tournament has been an annual event for several years. This tournament is lure to be a success this year and we hope that it will continue to be held every year from now on. The following teams are entered, Pleasant Hill Academy, Alpine High School, Gainesboro, Granville, Watertown, Viola, Algood, Rickman, Red Boiling, Smithville, Cookeville City School and T. P. I. Preps. Efforts are being made to secure Miss Genevieve Collins Head of Physical Education for Women. Peabody College as referee for the tournament. Bulldogs Helpless After Licking By Eagles The Cumberland Bulldogs crawled back to their kennel, Tuesday night, dragging behind them the short end of a court which read 28 to 20. The Eagles played one of their best games, but at times they seem to be matching mits with those of their equal. Through it all the Bulldogs threatened from time to time, but after the first quarter the locals were always able to climb away to a good margin when things began to look a bit panicky. The fan who sees them all was asked Monday, "What's the matter with T. P. I." He scratched his head. Asked the same question Tuesday until about half past nine he said, "nothing at all". When the rifle -shot pass was fumbled or overthrown a week ago it went straight to the wash and was handled as clean as possible. Where a shot fell off to one side last week it slid through tie loaf in fact one shot made by Vaughn actually climbed back into the basket after over half of it was falling The game was no set- up. There was one, Roberson, in a red uniform, who offered to show something of the art of basketball. He ran the team and worked himself in and out in good style but when the Bulldogs did succeed in working the ball back to crip shot range sue of his twelve foot jumps to block the throw at the hoop." and ran up a count 7 to 3 by the end of the first quarter but when the Eagles got their hooping machine to going they came ahead in double quick time. Moss and Winningham drew the anger of the Bulldogs offense, the reason being that they were the monkey wrenches that presested in gumming up the cogs of the Lawyer’s goaling machine. Vaughn worked the floor in his usual style and made good many difficult shots. He was the high scorer of the game. Winningham the genial back guard, brought the house down when he ended one of his fast trip up the floor with a long loop without touching anything but the netting. Watson's work in intercepting enemy passes was good. The officiating of the referee Clark was the kind which makes the game a game. Line Ups Tech (28) Cumberland (20) Vaughn (10) F Frilts (3) H. Evans (3) F Martin (4) Moss (7) C Robinson (9) Rubbins G Goodman (3) Winningham (6) G Hicks Substitutes: Tech – Watson. Refree –Clark Opera to be given by Glee Club The T. P. I. Glee Clubs are working on a light opera, The Pirates of Penzance, which they are planning to give some time during the spring term. Mr. James Greer will sing the part of the pirate chief and Oyama Winningham is the pirate apprentice. Robert Smith is a major-general in the British army and Fannie Wright Jarvis is his youngest daughter. Beulah Allison, Virgie Lowery, and Elsie Young are daughters of the major-general also, and Emily Stanton takes the part of maid-of-all-works. The boys' ad girls' choruses add very much to the charm of the opera. The scene is laid on a desert island and the whole opera promises to be unusually interesting. We are glad you are here. We wish that we could keep you. Boys’ Tournament March 3rd 4th 5th, With Twenty-five Teams Entered The fourth annual Upper Cumberland Basketball Tournament for Boys will be held at the City High School Gymnamim on Mar. 3, 4, and 5. Twenty two teams have entered, thirteen of which have been here before. The list is as follows : Gainesboro, Celina, Livingston, Alpine, Baxter, Al-good, Watertown, Granville, Spencer, Smithville, Jamestown, Monterey, Cookeville Junior High School, T. P. I. preps, McMinnville, Manchester, Viola Dunlap,' Gordonville, Carthage, Crossville and Pikeville. That three teams that have won tournaments are: Granville, Gladeville, and Alpine. Many students now in T. P. I. have played on various teams during former tournament. Among them are G. Winningham, Richardson, K. Evans, H. Evans Vaughn, Greenwood, Woods, Mallory, S. Carr, Rich, Dowell, M. Gates, C. Davis, Butler, Poteet, Hargis. Basketball fans will have an opportunity to see as many games as they like during this tournament which is one of the outstanding events of the year. Co-eds Lose to Murfreesboro After holding the lead into the middle of the third quarter, the T.P.I. girls lost to middle Tennessee Teachers College 29-13. The score at end of first quarter was 6-1, T. P. I. leading. At half, the score was 9-7, T. P. I still ahead. Third quarter-19-13, Normal ahead; final score, 29-13 with Normal ahead. The score does not indicate the closeness of the game. The first half of the game was fast and interesting, but the second half was rough and the playing was ragged. Beasley was high scorer of the game, with 19 points: A. P. Whitson was next with 11 points. Lineup: Tech M.T.T.C. A.P. Whitson (11) F Beasley (19) Thompson (2) F Pitt L. Whitson C Vaughn Moore G Dillon Haile G Jones Referee Josh Hughes Substitutes, Normal: Templeton, Keeling, Ganaway. A school is prosperous in proportion to the horsepower and horse sense of its boosters. Can You Answer These Questions? Ask Biology Students about These Questions Which Are Studied in That Class The following are a few of the questions asked and discussed in the biology class. Some may appear easy and simple, but when studied scientifically have an important bearing on various subjects. 1. Do snakes have feet? 2. Do earthworms have a brain? 3. What means of communication do bees have? 4. How does an oyster eat? 5. Can a toad taste foot? 6. What are vitamins? 7. Do fish have blood? 8. What is the smallest animal in the world? 9. What is the smallest plant in the world? 10. How are leaves of plants made green? 11. What is the morphology of yeast? 12. Is there anything older than its mother? 13. What is life? 14. How is bread mould formed? 15. What is “Pond scum”? 16. Does a crawfish have a backbone? 17. Do honey bees see? 18. How many eggs does a queen bee lay per day? -The Babbler Bethel Five Wins from Tech by 39 to 17 Score Bethel College took revenge from Tenn. Tech in their home gym. Friday night Feb. 11. For the first half the teams were evenly matched. They swapped fumbles and bad passes after the rest period the Kentuckians took the floor, with renewed energy and overcome small margin that the Eagles held on them, never to be checked. The crip shots that the Kentuckians were permitted to make marked the decisive part of the game. Line Up Tech Bethel Evans F Regnold Vaughn F Higgins Winningham C Sanford Robbins G Rogers Watson G Cabrey Subs: Tech –Cobb, R. Evans, Johnson and Davis Bethel: Girh. Referee: Johnson Upper Cumberland Chooses Affirmative Side of Question for Debate The Upper Cumberland debater have chosen the affirmative side of the question submitted by the Sherwoods for the annual intersociety debate which is: Resolved, That Labor Unions as they now exist, are on the whole beneficial to the American people. Both teams are strong and will represent their societies well. College Finances Let students pay for education now suggested Let students pay for the entire cost of education. Here is a means of eliminating the necessity for perpetual begging, for the brother and danger of million dollar drives so at least thought some of the del-agates to a recent Association of American Colleges convention at Chicago. Instead of paying only 31 per cent of educational cost as they do now, college students should foot the entire educational bill, argued Trevor Arnett, authority on college finance, who represented the Carnegie Institute. He recommended that tuition fees be raised gradually to cover the entire cost of college courses. Scholarship loans and student aids of all kinds should be utilized to enable students to meet this additional charge, he said. Money now used for endowment could be diverted to these channels. Alfred College Experiments While discussion goes on, one college has lately begun to experiment with this new idea. The forthcoming catalog of Alfred University (New York) carries the announcement that tuition fees will be gradually increased to meet the cost of education. By a cooperative agreement the Harmon Founda lion premises to lend money to students unable to furnish cash. The tuition will increase gradually during the next three years, from the present amount of $150 year to $300. Eventually, Alfred University announces, this move will free education from the "stigma of eleemosynarism". Students Will Borrow Students will, of course, not be expected to pay the entire fee at once, except in rare cases only $150 or possibly $100, will be asked for in cash payment. The deferred obligation will be turned over to tuition within the next five years. In return, the Foundation will furnish the University with cash for current operating expenses. This is not the first attempt of the Harmon Foundation to lend money to students for completing their education. Since 1922 groups of students in 60 colleges have been borrowing from this source. The money loaned for a period of five years, to be repaid in installments of $10 per month. So far the plan has been quite successful; out of 357 borrowers only two have failed altogether in their payments. Students Will Lend Meanwhile something new under the sun, a system of student loans, has been established. Palaeopitus Dartmouth student government has begun the system of student loans described in the New Student of December 8. The following are the main provisions in the measure passed by Palaeopitus: 1. This fund shall be known as The Palaeopitus Student Loan Fund, the appropriation for which shall be made by Palaeopitus from the College Chest and shell be administered by the Committee hereinafter described. 2. The purpose of this fund shall be solely to furnish financial aid for any Dartmouth undergraduate who would otherwise be unable to meet his college bills in acceptance with the regulations of the college, “No student shall be perceived to register any semester take the final examination in course unless all college bills at that time are paid.” This fund shall be super by treasurer of the College man, a committee of three of the personnel department, the treasurer of Palatopitus, the Personnel officer acting Chairman of the Committee –Student Automobile Dictionary Carburetor –The place from all trouble starts. The Tech Oracle Official Publication of the students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Published Semi-monthly Subscription rates $1.50 per year Editorial Staff Editor in Chief Hazel Wall Assistant Editor Eleanor Haile Assistant Editor Benton M. Carr Associate Editors Athletic Harry Burrow Wit and Humor Robert Smith Exchange Alberta Cassetty Class Editor Lucille Lee Society Odell Cornwell Alumni Rebecca Johnston Feature Editor Jonnie Bilbrey Poet Vadus Carmack Business Manager David Terry Assistant Business Manager Circulation Manager Paul Tidwell Asst. Circulation Manager Alfred Gill Faculty Advisor J.M. Hatfield Printed by Herald Publishing Company. Entered at the Cookeville post office. Second-class rate pending. Dear Old Dad Sammie Ruth Womack We honor our mother and love her more than any other woman living, but I sometimes wonder if “dear old dad” does not grow a wee bit jealous of all the love and devotion we lavish on her? You rarely ever heard dad praised. He is the man that pays the bills –the fellow we go to when we are in need of money, and in many instances he is hardly considered a member of the family. I love my mother as much as any of you, but my father holds a place in my heart that no one can fill; and so it is of our “dear old dad” that I would speak to you today. When our fathers married and took upon themselves the responsibilities of family life, they were practically all of them young of perhaps younger than you college boys. They had the same love of life, the same enthusiasm in sports, and the same capacity of enjoyment that you boys have. Probably none of them and the advantages of a college education, but no matter from what station of life they came, they had a good time. All this they gave up for us. What have we done for them? They do not except much from us; but they do expect and we show them due respect and that we make the most of the opportunities which they have made it possible for us to have. Our fathers are human beings, and they enjoy being loved and praised as much as our mothers do. We have a mother’s day, a young peoples’ day, and recently in Nashville a week was set aside as boys’ week. But where does dad’s day come in? I know the fathers have long ago lost faith in the old adage “that every dog has his day”. Let us consider how hard they have worked and toiled for us and what we owe them in return. Some of them have worked from early morning until late at night in order that we may have better advantages than they had. They are happy in our success and they have long ceased to dream of what they might have been and they have transferred their dreams and ambitions to the lives of their children. What proud father has not pictured to himself his son as a president? And thus it is if we would make dad happy and make him feel that all his efforts have not been in vain, we must do our best in everything. Let us not think of dad as an outsider and one who can not understand things. The reason many of us have formed this opinion of our fathers is that we have not given him a chance to prove himself otherwise. We have lived under the same roof all these years, and yet understand each other as much as do the rankest of strangers. Young people, this applies to you. May I ask that you get acquainted with him and make him your partner and pal in every place of your life. He will enjoy hearing all your joys and your sorrows and will take pride in helping you. Long ago the idea was formed that the whole existence of the family depended upon the mother, but this idea has been proved false as it was formed in a time when so many fathers turned down their families for strong drink. We have ceased to say that when we lose our mothers we have lost our best best friend, but that we have lost one of the best friends, for our father is, in truth, as good a friend as our mothers. And let us not wait until t is too late to show dad we love and appreciate him but if we have any roses for him, give them to him now instead of putting them on his grave. Palladians and Upper Cumberlands Have a Valentine Program “With a steady swing and an open brow We have tramped the way together.” The Palladians and their follow workers, Upper Cumberlands, were loath to admit the passing of a festival day without some commemoration. And accordingly, when Valentine came, thinking of past work together and “The leagues that lie before us” they met together in the auditorium and left on the program books of the society a few numbers for future members to be proud: Devotional –Baily Bockman Vocal Duet –Beulah Allison and Robert Smith, accompanied by Dan Jarvis Declamation –Paul Moore The program was as concluded with a Valentine contest, and prizes were awarded O’dell Cornwell, Polly Hudgens and Beulah Allison. Death of Mr. Henderson’s sister We were very sorry to learn of the death of Mrs. A. G. Scott which occurred at her home in Jonesboro, Arkansas, on February 11 after an illness of several months. Mrs. Scott was a sister of Mr. J. M. Henderson and the mother of Allen G. Scott, who was a student of T. P. I. at the beginning of the fall quarter. He was called home on account of the illness of his mother and was unable to return. We extend our deepest sympathy to Mr. Henderson and the Scott family. Eagles lose hard fought game to businessmen The quintet of Bowling Green Business University won a hard fought game from Tennessee Tech’s five by a one point margin. The score being 30 to 29. The first half of the game was a little slow but through the entire last half it was not known whether either team had the edge on the other, as both teams were playing a rapid game. It was not until the time whistle ended the game that the spectators or team knew which would win. Vaughn was the high scorer of the game, he looped 19 of Tech 29 points. Line up T. P. I. B. G. B. U. Vaughn F Perisho Evans F Stamper Winningham C Williams Robbins G Lewis R. Evans G Weems Subs, Tech: Cobb, Johnson Referee: Smith Advertising is the life of trade and the death of failure. Music Notes The chapel hour Wednesday of last week and Thursday of this week was given to Miss Stanton, who arranged some very interesting programs. On Wednesday, the program consisted of: Piano solo: Minuet Paderewski Virginia Wilcox Vocal Solo: Where my Caravan has Rested A Garden Romance – Beulah Allison Saxophone Solos: Selection from “The Mikado” Toddling Sax –Lauren O’Dell On Thursday morning the following program was given: Reading –“Home Sweet Home” O’dell Cornwell Vocal Solos: “By the Water of Minnesota” --Cadman “Spring Fancy –Denmore --Daninie Wright Jarvis. New Books for Library The following books were added to the library last week: “Far From the Maddening Crowd” by Thomas Hardy. “The Choir Invisible” by James Lane Allen “In the Tennessee Mountains” by Charles Egbert Craddock “The Black Tulip” by Alexander Dumas. “The Marble Faun” by Natahniel Hawthorne “The Appreciation of Art” by Eugen Newhaus “Great Artists and Their Work” by Alfred Mansfield Brooks “Democracy and the Party System” by Osthogorski “Hand Andy” by Samuel Lover “Ninety-Three” by Victor Hugo “Shirely” by Charlotte Bronte Everybody Wants to Attend College “More and more students in our colleges” –year after year the Boston Transcript’s annual survey of college education has brought forth this hackedneyed statement. This year it is revised. Now, “everybody wants to go to college.” Approximately 750,000 young people are now attending colleges in the United States. Many statistics will follow, the transcript announces, of which a good percentage, it is hoped, will prove illuminating; but none will there be more indicative of current conditions in the realm of American higher education than these: Only thirteen in 10,000 of the population of France and only fifteen in 10,000 of the population of the British Ilses are found in the universities of those countries; there were in our colleges and universities during 1923 about 600,000 students, or about sixty in 10,000 of the population of this country. --New Student. Locals Several former Tech students will present at the Valentine party given Saturday evening, February 12, by the Belles Lettres and Sherwood Literary Societies. The following T. I. I. students spent the week-end away: Arlie Moss – Chattanooga Hugh Butler –Celina Milard Gates –Celina Willie Cherry–Celina A.C. Willis –Spencer Henry Chapman –Spencer Pearle Cornwall –Nashville Ann Elizabeth Bracey –Nashville Eugene Collier –Nashville Mr. and Mrs. Smith Entertain Faculty. The faculty of T. P. I and their wives were delightfully entertained at the home of Acting President A.W. Smith and Mrs. Smith on Monday evening, February 14. The Valentine idea was carried out in the decorations, amusements, and refreshments. Seven tables of progressive rook were played, Mrs. Pinkerton receiving the prize, a lovely handkerchief. For the highest score. Mr J.M. Hatfield was the winner of a contest, due to his proficiency in forestry. The faculty appreciated the counesy extended them by Mr. and Mrs. Smith, as this was the first opportunity they had had of getting together. News Items At a meeting of the State Board of Education on February 11, $400 was appropriated for the purchase of a large motor driven lawn mower for use on the campus and athletic field. Mr. Austin W. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Pinkerton, and Miss Oliver attended the Teachers Meeting at Smithville last Saturday, where Mr. Smith addressed the teachers of Dekalb Count. Miss Eunice Allen, Miss Brownie Renfore, Miss Lilah Hembree, and Mr. Z. I. Beachboard, members of the faculty of the Smithville Highschool, were here for the game between the Smithville girls and T.P.I. Prep girls. Mrs. Chas. Cooper was president at the chapel hour Wednesday morning and sang three numbers which were very much enjoyed by the student body. Prep Beats Baxter in First Game In a game marred by unusual roughness and a great number of fouls. T.P.I. preps defeated the Baxter seminary 30 to 22 one night last week in the City school gyms. The preps led through the game by a small margin, but it looked as if the Baxterians would go ahead several times. Neville for Baxter was the high scorer. He basketed 8 field goals. McDonald for the Preps. Was successful in ringing the bell five times for 2 points each and one free goal. Line Up Preps Baxter McDonald F Puckett Greenwood F Boyd Moore C Neville Cobb G Lynn Rich G Brown Subs: Preps, Robbins Baxter –Jones, Jaquess Love Love is a native of the rocks, Of briery paths and stony places: She has no bond with men who wear The placid mask of happy faces; She favors not the glittering court, Its ennui- nor its gaudy graces-.L-. Love dwells among the weathered rocks. Of the wind-swept and silent spaces. Love cohabits with the winds That swirl in elemental fury Above the earth and when she sends Her challenge to a tired heart, weary With the quiet tenor of its way, Her mandate is so softly spoken It reeks not of the price to pay, Nor counts the hearts already broken. 0, yes! Love dwells among the rocks, Her haven is the unseen places Where God meets god and stars in flocks A- cruising go through empty spaces. And she is king and she is queen To fits of despotism given And through her scepter is unseen It rules the earth as well as heaven --Vadus Carmack It is a striking coincidence that American ends in “I Can.” The Luck of Having a Job Good luck is the twin brother of hard work, while hard luck is a close relative of laziness. Luck dreams of a dollar, work earn it. Luck pictures a home, while work builds it. Luck takes a nap, while brains are winning points. Trusting to luck is fishing with an empty hook. The map who relies on luck is lucky if he keeps out of the poor house. True luck means rising at six in the morning—out on the floor before the alarm clock stops. Living on a dollar if you earn two. Minding your own business. Noticing your own faults as closely as you do your neighbor’s. It means appointments you never failed to keep, trains you never failed to catch, the opportunities you did not miss. I’ve noticed, too, that bad luck and an unguarded tongue often go together. Then, too, the victim of bad luck is often incapable of team work. That handicaps him from taking part in the big Games. Good fortune is the accident that befalls the fit. There isn’t much perversity of events. The buttered side down of ill luck happens because it is the buttered side. Everything hits the sore spot, but not more than any other. One finds what he is looking for, and all things rush to the service of him who knows how to use them. Our successes are at least collaterally incident to our attempts. We meet casually some day the very mood for which we long have waited. If we carry a botany box of observation we shall gather many specimens. Into the magazine of the eager mind the spark of incident will inevitably drop. Joseph was a “lucky fellow,’ but part of his good luck was that he had an opportunity of demonstrating his fitness for doing large things by his faithfulness to small ones. He had the luck of being a servant. That was his chance. Every fellow who has a job has a chance. Don’t think for a moment that things went smooth and without opposition at the court of Pharahb. There were palace intrifues and high offcials who tried to knife him in the dark. Any man who tries to strike twele finds a dozen hands reaching for the muffler. When ou are at the bottom lots of folks at you on the head and say, “Poor dog! You deserve better,” but start bravely upward and the crowd haunts a rock to hurl at “such an upstart.” News From Other Colleges A student’s organization of Buenos Aires sent a telegram of congratulation to senator Borah expressing gratitude at his “defense of Nicaragua,” and for showing the people in the United States the “true situation.” In Mexico City an association of Central Americans to boycott American goods until the Marines are withdrawn from Nicaragua is being led by Juan Mella, a Cuban student. The association has already sent telegrams to American political leaders’ demanding the withdrawal of American troops. A national Union of Canadian students may be formed, similar to the National Union of England and Wales, the “Confederation Internationale des Etudiantes” of Europe and the National Student Federation of America. Representatives of eleven Canadian colleges and universities met in Montreal during the Christmas vacation to decide whether the project is feasible. In the West Canadian colleges fell an especial need for this union. The “better understanding” which a union would bring about is wanted in these institutions which are at present practically isolated from the rest of the Dominion. The situation is somewhere better in the East, because of an Intercollegiate Union. More than 1,000 persons attended the annual short course for farm people at Albama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn. Sixty countries of the 67 in Albama were represented. Teachers to the number of 114 from British overseas dominions, Canada, Australia, South Africa, and New Zealand, are teaching this year in schools of Great Britain, and the same number of teachers from England and Scotland have gone to replace them temporarily, under the plan for teacher exchange arranged by the British League of Empire. Sherwoods The Sherwood Literary Society met in its regular meeting room on February 14, and rendered the following program: Devotional—Chaplain Debate: Resolved that Japanese and Chinese should be admitted to United States citizenship Affirmative Negative Clyde McDonald Joe McClain Jasper Harp Homer Gates Declamation –Olin Carr. Jokes—Guy Boyd. The negative were successful in obtaining a favorable report from the judges. The affirmative speakers proved that they were competent of consideration as debaters. There were no vacant seats in our meeting room and several of the members were required to stand. Come on, Sherwoods, and let’s make it 100 per cent next time. J.L. Myers made a peppy speech which brought us to a realization of our duty in Society. Dr. Sheeley Here on Feb. 22 On February 22 Dr. F.N. Seerly of New York will be at the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute to speak to students. He comes under the auspices of the Young Men’s Chstian Association and will spend the day in conferences with various groups. Those who remember Dr. Hall who was here a few years ago will look forward to Dr. Seerley’s visit, as his work is similar to that of Dr. Hall. Cumberland University Falls Before T.P.I. Shift their combination as they would and battle to the end as they did, Cumberland University’s Bulldogs were unable to match goals with T.P.I. Golden Eagles, and went down in defeat by 26 to 22 in the Cumberland gym. The constant swapping of the Bulldogs made a good game of one which otherwise probably would have been mediocre. It was a constant repetition of the things all the way. The Eagles would bring the ball up the floor and one of the TPI’s sharpshooters, would pitch a goal and the Bulldogs would slip in and fight their way back up the court and flip in a counter. Things went evenly at times but usually the Eagles kept five or six points in the lead. It was a hard game for the Bulldogs to drop, more so for the reason that Coach Knee thinks his superior to those of TPI Seven Bulldogs saw service, while Coach Overall used but five men. Try as they might, the Lebanons could not find a smooth working combination. Line Up Ten Tech Cumberland H. Evans F Fitts Vaughn F Martin Moss G Robinson Robbins G Goodman Winningham G Hicks Subs: Cumberland Drescall, Layman Importance of Brood Sow on Farm Donald Moore There is no other animal department of the farm that is of more importance than a good brood sow. The farm that keeps a brood sow does not have to depend on the meat market for its meat supply. The cook only goes to the smokehouse without her purse, and not even realizing how much she gets. The farm is looking for cash income; nothing will come nearer filling this demand than a sow. A quick turn-over of feed is realized and usually a nice profit is made. The sow utilizes all garbage such as: skim-milk, buttermilk, kitchen slop, etc., also eats refused feed, and other products from the garden that would otherwise go to waste. The hogs, if the farmer desired, will gather and market his crops. The necessity of pasture for hogs will force the farmer to plant legumes and cover crops, which will be indirectly a great benefit to the farmer. The farm that keeps a sow has available an even supply of quality feeders at all times. The farm that does not have a brood sow on it can easily see where it is losing money both directly and indirectly. Belle Lettres and Sherwoods Sponder Valentine Party A delightful social event of the winter term was the Valentine party given Saturday night Feb. 12 in the TPI auditorium. The room was decorated with red and white crepe peper streamers and hearts. Streamer of paper led from each window to large red heart in the center of the room. The lights were shaded with red paper giving a radiant effect. Games were played in the gymnasium and contests were enjoyed in the auditorium. The ones receiving prizes were Mrs. A.W. Smith, Mayme Gipson and Homer Gates, Jessie Barnes Johnny Bilbrey, Mary Frances Whitson and Harry Burrows. Refreshments were served from the library. The menu included, Heart sandwiches hipolite and cherry sandwiches, Heart mints, nuts in red meat cups and coffee. The chaperones were Mr. and Mrs. Lane, Mr. Lane being Sponsor of the Belles Lettres and Mr. and Mrs. Hatfield. Mr. Hatfield being the Sherwood Sponsor. Other members of the faculty enjoyed the occasion. Because chapel groups hear prominent speakers number barely enough to start a good basketball game and because voluntary chapel means to most a permanent excused absence, the Richmond collegian, University of Richmond Virginia pleads for the return of compulsory services. You can be successful in boosting your town, but don’t try to shove it. Meeting of Alumni executive council (continued from page 1) Were authorized to write the Senator Hensley and Representative Anderson in the name of the Association, asking them to support the Appropriation Bill for this institution which is before the Legislature. Interesting Chapel Address The students of TPI were again fortunate in having Dr. TC. Crume, the evangelist from Kentucky, to speak to them the second at the chapel last Friday. Dr. Crume’s subject was “success” and he made a very inspiring talk. Practically all the students took notes and Dr. Crume has offered a copy of his book, “Evangelism in Action” to the student who will send him the best outlines of both the addresses which he has delivered to the students. He has also presented a copy of this book to the school library and the students appreciate it very much.

1927 2 20

 THE SEMI-MONTHLY Tech Oracle SENIOR COLLEGE CLASS The Senior College Class of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute is the largest graduating class in the history of the institution. Several members of the class who lack sufficient credits to graduate in June are planning to graduate at the end of the summer term. The Senior Class has for its very efficient president Henry L. Barger. This is Mr. Barger’s second year in this capacity and he has filled the office with honor and distinction. Our faculty sponsor for this year is Mr. William K. Tipton of the Department of Science. Mr. Tipton is an alumnus of the University of Tennessee and has given us many helpful suggestions as to class activities. The Senior Class has planned an interesting program for class day during Commencement Week. It is planned to make this the most interesting program given by any class in several years. Practically every member of the class will appear on the program. Members of the Senior Class were the recipients of a very pleasant Social given them by the Juniors on Friday evening, April 4th at the Smith Apartments. Everyone was more pleased with the splendid program. The Senior Class has adopted the idea of leaving as a class memorial a tree upon the campus. Accordingly a committee of the class was selected to secure an American elm and set it out on the South end of the Campus. This was done on Tuesday of this week. It is hoped that this precedent will be followed by the graduating classes in succeeding years. Junior-Senior Reception A recent social event of interest to Tech students was the reception given by the Junior College Class on Friday evening, April 4, in honor of the Senior College Class. Those receiving were Mrs. Q.M. Smith and Mr. Kittrell, () class sponsors, assisted by the Officers of the Junior Class; Eugene Collier, President Rose Dow, Vice-Pres, and Donnell Evans, Treasurer. A very interesting program was given: Reading, Villa Carmack. Trombone solo, Gilbert Hatfield Solo dance, Mary Ada Neal Group of songs, Mrs. Q. M. Smith. After the program, the guests gathered in the dining room where a buffet supper awaited them. This is probably the first attempt of any class in T.P.I. to give a formal reception, but the success of this event removes all doubt as to the desirability of such a class function and it is to be hoped that future classes will follow the precedent, thus making it an annual affair. With The Base Ball Team Coach Overall's retinue of baseballers came into Lebanon at 12 o’clock Thursday to battle with the Cumberland Bull Dogs. The team rode a ‘Reo Bus from Nashville so no one can blame them for losing the game. Summer pitched for Tech while Majors pitched for Cumberland. The game was nobody’s for a few innings, but Cumberland lucked one run in the second frame, the score sttod 1-0 against Tech until the fifth inning when the Bull Dogs bunched their hits and ran in six scores, most of which were unearned. The Cumberland men found trouble in hitting the cock-eyed slants of Summer. He walked only three men while Majors walked six. Cumberland 010 063 000-7 T.P.I. 000 000 010-1 Stolen bases, Mooney Moore. Left on bases, Tech 10, Cum. 8, Bases on balls, off Summer 3, off Majors 6. Struck out by Summer, 3 by Majors 6. Time of Game 3:15. In the second game with the Bull Dogs “Big Buff” LaFevers pitched for Tech and Lynch handed out the balls for Cumberland. Cumberland took an early lead and collected two runs in the second stanza, they again gleaned three more in the fourth, they then skipped an inning and made four more in the sixth, the slaughter stopping here and “Bug Buff” came loose and held them scoreless for the remaining innings. Tech’s one counter was made in the seventh when Jimmie Clark came to bat. Cumberland’s catcher, “Dusty” Miller called the outfielders in lose, little thinking that so small a man could pack such a hard swing. Over came the ball and crash –it was gone over the centerfielders head, Murray chased the ball to the score board where it rolled under. When Murray got the ball Jimmie was just checking out from third. This is one of the few home runs that were ever knocked on that field. Murray smashed out a triple for Cumberland with the satchels loaded. The line up same as first except Summer for Shipley. Summary. Three base hits. Macy, Murray, Sotouen bases, Maione, 1. Left on bases, Tech 6 Cumberland 5. Base off balls, Lynch 1 LaFever 1. Struck out by Lafever 7, by Lynch 5, by Curry 4. Some people are kicking because Tech didn’t make much of a showing against Cumberland. Well, Cumberland beat Tech 7 to 1 and University of Indiana 7 to 3. So there’s the dope. Cumberland has one of the best college teams in the South. Many of her players have played four years college ball and then take a law course and play four more with the lawyers. You will have to hand it to them. They have a team. Well, it’s a long lane that has no turning. Tech beat Cumberland two years ago 24 to 6. Coach Overall has done great work for Tech Athletics this year. It is a great disadvantage to take a high school team and try to compete with four year colleges, only two college men will get letters this year and they are Freshmen. The Tech team journeyed to foreign lands again Monday to play Castle Heights, of Lebanon. The game was called at 3:30. The Tech boys were in no condition to play as they had just completed a week’s trip. The work and loss of sleep had changed the Tech clan into an aggregation of invalids. They played a listless game and only came out of their lethargy a few times during the game. Johnston came up in the second inning and knocked a three base smash down third base line, he drew up at third and Clark laid down a bunt and Johnston was thrown out in home. “Peel” Webb was handing () up the ball for Tech and Swift for Heights. Swift, naturally, threw some fast ones, but he was bumped for six runs. Webb whiffed 9 men and Swift 5, Anderson 3. The budding soldiers clustered their hits and when the smoke cleared away they were leading 8 to 6. The Tech team did not come out of their “Rip Van Winkle” in time to win. Three base hits, Johnston, Homers, Williams, Baird. Left on bases, Tech 8, Heights, 6. Struck out by Webb, 9. Anderson 3, Swift 5. Hit by pitcher by Webb, Swift. By Swift, Coillier. Umpires, Malone, Hightower, Time of game 3:30. Senior Highs The Senior High School Class of ’24 is one of the largest in the history of the school. Most of the members of this class have been in this institution during the entire four years. We have for our sponsor Mr. C.B> Richmond, the instructor in music, who has at all times manifested great pleasure in being with us. He has been very enthusiastic in assisting us to make plans. Through his instrumentality the Seniors are sponsoring “Mikado” a musical opera, to be given during commencement. This opera is very classical in its nature. Lee Sadler Darwin is the class President and he has very successfully executed the duties of the office. He has always shown a great interest in the class and we are indeed proud of his active leadership. Our class has been very active in athletics this year. During the winter term we had a basketball quintette which won the championship of the school and also played Baxter Seminary and Algood High School. We have a baseball team which we hope will also excel those of the other classes. A number of the Seniors intend to teach school next year, some will follow other occupations, but they will do this merely for money to continue their school training. Practically all of them plan to go on to college. The Senior Class has made arrangements for a class day program during the commencement which will be given in connection with the Senior College Class. The Senior Class is very grateful to the members of the staff for the space which they have allowed us in the School paper and we assure them that we shall put forth every effort to make the paper a success. The high premium on honesty may be due to the fact that it is the best policy. Faculty Corner We are glad to give this part of our paper over to our faculty. We shall from time to time publish such matter as the various teachers will hand us. This section will be called, “Faculty Corner.” The editor of this department here by invites the teachers to furnish plenty of material to make this the best department of all. With a very few exceptions the teachers attended the State Teachers Association at Nashville, April 17th, 18th, and 19th. President Smith and Mr. Land participated in the program of the Association. We are very glad to note that Mr. McClanahan is manifesting his usual enthusiastic attitude toward our efforts in the publication of this paper. His many suggestions have been very valuable. He says that there is not reason why we cannot have a paper second to none. Mr. S. M. Hatfield says, “Why, yes, Dean Smith has decided lately to abolish the Constitution and put us under a parliamentary form of government.” Dean Smith reports that he has challenged Mr. J.M. Hatfield to a forensic duel on the subject, Resolved: That Congress should have the power to over-ride decision of the Supreme Court declaring acts of preceding congresses unconstitutional. This battle will likely materialize within a fortnight, if Mr. Hatfield accepts. Dean Smith suggests also that evidences of spring fever are becoming more numerous as spring advances. We are glad to learn from Mr. Barnes that the Chemistry Laboratory is soon to be equipped with hoods to take care of the escaping gases and smoke which is occasioned by the numerous experiments. Mr. Passons is expecting a splendid program to be rendered when the contestants for the Ezra Davis oratorical medal meet. The Student Activity Committee has recognized this contest by allowing it to count one point toward the Wilson Banner. This is a new medal and much interest is being manifested in it. TLere will be about one half dozen contestants for it. Miss Bryan says she has no special report, except it might be said that one of her greatest worries is to keep Charles Branham from smiling too loud. Mr. Tipton says he is very much pleased with the start we have made with the “Oracle” and that he sees no reason why we cannot have one of the best school papers to be found anywhere. Mr. Tipton is Sponsor for the Senior College Class, and expresses his approval of the action taken by this class when they planted a tree on the campus, to be left as a permanent mark of the class. Mr. Kittrell suggests that Dean Smith broke the rule the other day by returning his and ink which was borrowed the day before. We wish to thank the various members of the faculty for their advice and aid on this publication. We shall expect all faculty members to give us plenty of material for each issue, and help us to make the last issue a howling success. Sherwood Literary Society We are very proud of the work being done by the Sherwood Literary Society this year. We have received the following new members this term: Tardy, Langford, Bohannon and Parsons; men of whom we are justly proud. The Inter-Society Debate which was won Friday evening, April 11, has caused joy to the Sherwoods and redeemed for us the Womack loving cup. The Sherwood Debating team, composed of L.C. Harris and J.C. Evans, principals, and J.P. Buck and G.E. Crowder, alternates, are deserving of high honors in adding this point in our fight for the Wilson Banner for next year. This banner has been in our possession continuously ever since it was first awarded, which fact in itself is ample proof of the stellar work of the Society. Our opponents are launching their 1924 attack with a greater determination than ever before. The Sherwood forces are in battle array. The first assault has been repulsed and we stand ready to defend this sacred banner whose silken threads have woven themselves into our very being. If we were to prove unfaithful, and betray this flag to the foes ‘twould droop its head in sorrow to remind us of its woes. Freshman High The freshman class this year is one of the largest classes to enter T.P.I. since the birth of the institution. The work done by this class has been of a high standard, there being very few failures reported. David Terry was elected President the first two terms, and was succeeded by Audy Johnson this term. These and other officers have performed their duties with efficiency during the entire year. Our sponsor, Mr. McClanahan, has been of much assistance this year giving many valuable suggestions which have been of a great deal of aid in carrying out our class organization. The Freshman class has been planning for a class picnic soon, provided satisfactory arrangements can be made. The Freshmen have cooperated with the sponsor to give an interesting program on Class Day at the Commencement. The nature of the program has not been disjointed but it is assured that the Freshmen will “pull something” original. According to the old adage that is “in union there is strength” we may judge that owning to the numbers of the Freshmen we may have something interesting. Y.M.C.A. The Y.M.C.A. is getting in shape now to do really active work. Our Sunday afternoon services are beginning to draw large crowds. Last Sunday Bro. Lawrence came out and gave us a very interesting talk was enjoyed by all. In addition to this the “Y” is doing some outside work. We are sending J.I. McDowell and Lee Sadler Darwin to Nashville this week-end to represent our organization in the Students Bible Conference in the Y.M.C.A. Building in that city. Y.W.C.A. The Y.W.C.A. met and elected a new cabinet for 1924. The following officers were chosen. Miss Clyde Jackson, Pres. Miss Villa Carmack, V. Pres Miss Auby Scott, Sec’y and Treas. Miss Irene Paschall, Chm. Program committee Miss Jackson was chosen as the local delegate to the Y.W.C.A. Conference to be held at Blue Ridge, N.C. in June. Tech Oracle Published semi-monthly by the student body of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute Cookeville, Tennessee. Staff Harry H. Jenkins, ‘24 Editor in Chief. Emmett E. Smartt, ‘24 Associate Editor. Jas. P. Buck, ’24 Class Editor Luther C. Harris, ‘24 Editor, Student Organization Henry L. Barger, ’24 Faculty Editor. Mable Holladay, ‘24 Exchange Editor. Alex Shipley, ‘25 Athletic Editor Nellie Anderson, ‘26 Wit and Humor Editor Juanita Oliver, ‘27 Social Editor. James D. Miller, ‘26 Business Manager. Madeline Jackson, ‘24 Assistant Business Manager. Thos. L. Passons, English Faculty Advisor. Strand Theatre Make arrangements now to see “Down to the Sea in see “DOWN TO THE SEA IN SHIPS,” Thurs. and Fri. 24th and 25th this week. A real fight with a 90 ton whale in mid-ocean makes this one a masterpiece. Anita Stewart in “The Love Piker” 28th and 29th. “The Call Of The Wild” May 1st and 2nd. “Way Down East” May 8th, 9th, 10th. Tech on the Road The Tech boys journeyed to Fayetteville Tuesday for a couple of games with Bryson. The first game was played on a field ofturf as regular diamond was too muddy. The Tech infielders were at a disadvantage but they handled the balls better than the Brysonites. “Peel” Webb pitched a splendid game.His curves made the Bryson men look like carpet beaters. They often missed the rainbow outs a yard. The score was 3 to 0 in Tech’s favor in the seventh but Bryson tied by bunshing hits. Tech untied the score at her next bat. Bryson scored a run in the 8th stanza. The game ended 5 to 4, Bryson leading. The Tech men collected more hits than Bryson. All Bryson’s runs were unearned by being due to errors. “Peel” Webb struck out ten of Bryson’s men, while Tucker whiffed nine of Tech’s batters. “Peel” had to lay down his glove and laugh when he saw the Bryson men strike at balls which hit the turf a yard in front of the plate. Webb threw three balls to the first batter and then fanned him. He then promptly fanned a couple more. The first twelve men for Bryson never reached first base due to the good pitching and fast fielding. The two Clarks and Rickman fielded hard balls and whipped them to Collier who took them in for put outs. The outfielders, Summers, Puckett and Hudson covered their ground. Summary: Hits, Hudson 1, Dick Clark, 2; Summers 1, Johnson 2, Two bases, Clark. Anderson pitched the second game and pulled Webb’s trick of throwing three balls and then fanning a couple of men. Anderson whiffed ten men of Bryson’s against eight for Harwell of Bryson. The game was 0 to 0 in the sixth when the head of the list came up for Bryson. Six hit were made in this stanza which netted Bryson six runs. Rickman fielded two balls which came sizzling down 3rd base line and shot them to first for put outs. Jimmy Clark gleaned the first hit by laying down a perfect bunt one yard inside the third base line. He beat it out by yards and then promptly stole second but died on third. Many men were on at different times but the Tech batteries could not connect with the ball so all chances to score were lost. Summer and Puckett collected a hit apiece in the sixth but two men were gone and they failed to score. Johnson played good game at catcher and helped the pitchers mow down the batters. Fowler Clark was hit in the head in the first game by a high fast ball. Bryson won 7 to 0. A majority of Bryon’s runs were unearned. The Spokesman Retires After One Issue After one issue had been gotten out the Society Spokesman has retired in favor of the Tech Oracle. Feeling that it was to the best interests of the school, the staff of the Spokesman decided that there was no further need for the Spokesman to continue since a school journal had been so well established and so unanimously voted to discontinue its publication. However since it was on such a firm business basic and its advertisements so well arranged it was decided to offer to the Oracle the benefits of such subscriptions and advertising as it had taken which offer has been accepted by the staff of the Oracle. Therefore, all subscriptions to the Spokesman will become subscribers to the Oracle without further payment. College Types Those who are really familiar with America’s college system no doubt grow a bit wear at odd times with the manner in which fiction, magazine articles and newspaper stories today treat and show the general public current college types. At first glance it would appear that the average college community was made up of boys and girls who did nothing but play various games with greater of less kill and success, or else cheered for their fellows who did, danced to all hours, had queer ideas about things in general, wore even more peculiar clothes spoke an odd language faintly resembling English, and, in short, did almost everything but study and behave in a normal fashion. AH this to judge from reports. As a matter of fact, there are many college students who do follow out the course of procedure above hinted at with rather remarkable fidelity, and there are, perhaps, entirely too many of them in almost any institution one might choose to mention, but, fortunately for everybody concerned, the study through it usually ends here, need not and should not. The varieties mentioned do get publicity, as is but natural, for they are spectacular, but there are other sorts to be inspected for all that. In the American college today, be it said for the comfort of those who are alarmed over the future, there are hundreds and thousands of normal young men and women, without much money, actuated by a sincere desire to improve their minds, bodies and souls, and with a firm determination to amount to something worthwhile. These individuals wait on tables, fire furnaces, do tutoring, work in stores in the afternoons or at night deliver papers and labor in a thousand and one other jobs that help provide the necessary funds for an education. They are usually quiet enough to pass inspection anywhere, tho it must be said to their credit that the great majority of them are anything but down-hearted and hold up their heads with the best. They are interested in college life, take part in its activities as time and money allow and are worthy citizens of the college community generally. There are likewise present in all college communities a large number of boys and girls who study for all they are worth without the incentive that comes from the necessity for working their own way. They have a real interest in matters intellectual and love knowledge for its own sake. They are few enough, perhaps, but they are there for all that, and taken with the element that is working its own way, make up a class that functions with considerable ability and intelligence. The above statements are not to be construed as any effort to minimize the prevalence of frivolity and extravagance among students as they are, but with the desire of presenting another and equally truthful phase of the situation as it exists. The college problem is not a simple one and it needs the most earnest thought and efforts of those directly concerned with it and the hearty cooperation of parents and the public. The same thing may be said with equal accuracy of the high schools and primary schools. Changes and reforms that are salutary can be and will be made, but it is a serious error to be led to believe that there is no balm to all in the scholastic Gilead. --Nashville Banner. SOPHOMORE HIGH CLASS The Sophomore High Class are progressing nicely, with Mr. Land as sponsor. He has given many helpful suggestions which have aided in the class organization. The Class officers have been Willis Huddleston, President, for the first term, Haynie Beasley for the second term, and Shelah Officer for the present term. The class is planning on having an excellent baseball team this year. The team has organized by electing Holland Denny manager, and Lawrence Stamps captain. There are some of the Sophomore boys going out for the first team. Luther Puckett, Holland Denny, Clyde LaFever and Huston Wells are making good. The Sophomores are looking forward to winning the class championship this year. The Sophomore Class has made arrangements to take part in the class day program at Commencement, and are planning on giving an excellent program. Palladian Literary Society For the past several weeks much interest has been shown in the Society. It is being manifested in every program that the society presents. Each member is beginning to realize more and more that the life and the very existence of the society depends to a great extent on her attitude toward the Society. This interest and this spirit which finds us so closely in the Palladian Society is not that of individuality and self praise, but it is that of unity and the welfare of the Society which we keep in our hearts and which gives to each of us a common responsibility. The Society is showing some progress under the leadership of the President, Miss Verna Huddleston, and other efficient officers; who are doing all within their power to make the society better. They are giving to the society a foundation on which it can stand hence forward. The fidelity and loyalty of each member to the Society is clearly shown by the way she is performing her duty. Names is Names In the matter of names, Tech is blessed with numerous “handles” of significant meaning. For instance we have such craftsmen as four Coopers, two Millers, a Wheeler, a Baker, a Barber, a Cook, or two, a Draper, a Miner, a Taylor, a Dyer, and a Sadler. In addition we have such animals as a Fox, a Buck, two Robbins and a Bullock, with even the Gill of a fish head. Our geographical complex consists of two Hills, a Vallie, and a Lee with Fountains and Brooks flowing all around. We will not starve as long as we have with us a Berry, Rice and Wheat which is Alcorn. Barnes, Walls, Land, such flowers as Roses and Violets, fifteen cents (three Nichols) and even some stamps compose our quota of personal property. We have a King, and a few Officers, students who are Long, students who are Little, students who are Haile, Students who are Young, some who are White, some Brown and one who claims to be Smartt. Our Holidays are becoming fewer but we still have a Payne from being two Rash. Our luxuries consist of Two Carrs a Ford and a Maxwell. We might mention Moore but we see a Storm coming and this Story is Overall the allotted space. Tech Oracle For the first time in four years, Tech has a school journal. This is, we believe, an evidence of the growth of school spirit that actually finds some concrete way in which to express itself. For the remainder of this term little can be done except to put this paper on a sound foundation upon which, in the years to come, a towering skyscraper of spirit and development can be built and which will stand for and represent Tech only as a first class journal can do. We cannot nor could we expect to create within a month a paper with the literary style of a “Spectator” or the volume of a “Times” but we do expect to have a clean, wholesome paper, thoroughly in accord with those principles upon which our school is founded and in its columns we shall endeavor to have only those things which are of the highest value. We hope the subscribers will take this paper in the spirit that is it established, a nonpartisan paper except that is purely for Tennessee Tech, but without connection to society, class or any inside organization. So let us all, students of Tech, get behind this publication as we have gotten behind any other good movement in school and put it across with vim, making this in due time the highest class school publication in the state. Local Social Season Opens The local social season was opened Thursday evening with an informal dance given at Milfred by Whitney White. Hughes’ Joyland Six Orchestra furnished music for the occasion and throughout the evening Tutti Frutti frappe was served. Among those present were Miss Nan Holladay and Mr. Joe Copeland, Miss Harel Jenkins and Mr. Charles Cox, Miss Rozelle Pendergrass and Mr. David Terry, Miss Shelah Officer and Mr. Max Taylor, Miss Pauline Hudgens and Mr. Ernest Brooks, Miss Madeline Jackson and Mr. James Woodard, Miss Mary Frances McDearman and Mr. Harry Jenkins, Miss Mildred McDearman and Mr. John William Terry, Miss Myrtle Bullock and Mr. Benton Terry, Miss Verna Huddleston and Mr. Fred Terry, Miss Hallie Ray and Mr. Whitney White, Miss Elise Gregory and M. Lauren O’Dell, Mr. Robert Cornwell, Mr. Bancroft McDearman, Mr. John Alison and Mr. Raymond Hamilton. The Upper Cumberland Literary Society Since the loss of the debate the U.C.L.S. has turned it attention toward the forth coming contests. Declaimers are being tried out in Society meetings and the other contestants for medals are being spurred on to work. The programs of the Upper Cumberland Society given every Monday afternoon are showing marked imprivement In their preparation and show an increase in literary appreciation. Many good men have come into the Society this year and altho the loss of many valuable men through graduation this year is going to deprive the Society of its best leaders there is little doubt but that the Society has in its ranks enough men to keep the U.C.L.S. in the front. BELLES LETTRES LITERARY SOCIETY The Belles Lettres Literary Society met with the Sherwoods in a joint meeting April 7. The following interesting program was rendered. Invocation, Nellie Anderson. Opening Address. Donald Evans. Music, Merrelf Hughes. Reading, Flyde Jackson. Trombone Solo, Gilbert Hatfield. After the program the Sherwoods adjourned after which the Belles Lettres held their business meeting and passed that the President appoint a committee to select a gift for our debating team to show our appreciation of their hard work toward winning the Loving Cup. It was decided that a gold fountain pen and pencil should be presented to them on the night of the debate. JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL CLASS The Junior High School Class is progressing nicely under the leadership of Lewis McDowell. We are looking forward with great pleasure to the Senior party which will be given by the Juniors Friday evening, April 25th. The Juniors have planned the following program to be given on class day during Commencement week. Class History, Thelma Rash. Song, Class. Prophecy, Clifford Massa.

1924 April 25

 THE TECH ORACLE TECH OVERPOWERED BY CUMBERLAND Tech opened the local grid season of Friday, Oct. 17, against the strong Cumberland University aggregation. The game resulted in a 14-0 victory for the visitors. Aside from Knee, “the one man of the Cumberland defense,” the Tech squad outplayed the visitors by a good margin. It was only through his efforts that the visitors were able to penetrate the Tech defense to any appreciable extent. Tech lost two goods chances to score in the first quarter, when they twice held for downs in Cumberland’s territory. Cumberland scored in the initial quarter on several successive line plays, in which “Tiny” Knee was the main offensive weapon. He finally succeeded in carrying the ball across the goal and then added the extra point by a goal from placement. The Tech defense then tightened and good tackling by the whole team and excellent kicking by Hughes kept the ball in safe territory until the last quarter when Knee again bucked the ball to Tech’s one yard line and Cumberland carried it over the line. Knee again added the extra point, which ended the scoring for the entire game. The entire Tech squad gave good exhibitions of football ability. On several occasions Big Bynum and the other linemen broke through the opposing backs for losses. Jobe showed a great ability at backing up the line, it seemed that he was in every play. Hughes gave a fine exhibitions of punting, on several occasions he was hard pressed, but not a single kick was blocked and he averaged about 40 yards for the entire afternoon, clearly outpunting Knee, who averaged about 30 yards. The lineup follows: Cumberland Tech McKenzie R. End Hill C Murray R. Tackle Starnes Young R. Guard LaFevre Currie Center Clark Clements L. Guard Jackson Laswell L. Tackle Bynum Hicks L. End Puckett Cockrill Quarter Russell Parham R. Half Hughes Board L. Half Watson Knee Full Jobe Scoring touchdowns: Knee, Cunningham, Goals after touchdown: Knee 2. Substitutions: Cumberland: Parnell for Hicks, Hunt for Murray, Cunningham for Parham Tech: Davis for La Fevre, Miller for Bynum, Bynum for Miller for Watson, Suggs for LaFevre,Blount for Jobe. If you are a self starter, your teacher won’t have to be a crank. The man who whines that he never had a chance is probably the follow who wouldn’t recognize one I he met it in the road. ALUMNI NEWS Henry L Barger of the Institute class of 1924 is now Principal of the Junior High School at Big Springs, Tennessee. Cindidentally, Mr. Barger is the candidate for representative from his county, and as such should command the support of every Tech Alumnus. Bascome Countiss, a Tech graduate of the class of 1920, has won fame for himself in the judging contest at the World’s Dairy congress which was recently held at Waterloo, Illinois. Mr. Countiss won third prize in the judging contests. When in school at this institution Mr. Countiss was editor of the Tech Dynamo and won numerous other honors by his devotion to his studies. For the last four years he has been a student at the University of Illinois. Harry Jenkins, last year’s editor of the Oracle, is now taking premed worked at Vanderbilt University. Walter G. Birdwell of the High School class of 1923 has accepted a position as casher of the bank at Red Boiling Springs, Tennessee. Although we hate to lose Walter from our school, we feel sure that his natural ability, coupled with his strict attention to duty, will insure him a successful career in his chosen profession. LITERARY SOCIETIES BELLES LETTRES The Belles Lettres Society met in the Auditorium on October, 20, 1924. A very interesting program on the study of Burns was rendered. Life of Burns –Ruth Vanhooser. Quotations from Burns –Ona V Ellis. Piano Solo –Daly Starnes Song, Flow Gently Sweet Afton, Society Criticism –Alyne Martin. Miss Nellie Anderson and Mrs. Jewel Johnson, two former Belles Lettres presidents were present. Each made a very interesting talk. We are glad to announce that we have two more very promising young ladies to become members of the Belles Lettres Literary Society. They are Miss Georgia Whitaker and Miss Effie Wood. PALLADIAN The Palladian Literary Society has a larger membership this year than ever before. The programs are more interesting and educational. Everyone is doing her part to help make the society better. The members are attending more regularly and a great year is being planned for 1924-5. TECH WINS FROM MIDDLE TENN. NORMAL The football squad left Thursday for Murfreesboro, where they met the strong Normal team on Friday and handed them the small end of a 6-0 score. The game was very close and interesting, as the score indicates but the strong Tech defense kept the “normalites” well away from our goal. Tech lost a wonderful chance to score in the first quarter, when in one yard of the goal an end run was attempted and Blount was thrown for a 20 yard loss. In the third quarter “Dutch” got away for an 80 yard dash across the goal. Cahoon missed the try for goal, but little did it matter, for the damage was already done. Miles was the outstanding star for Normal. The entire Tech team played excellent football, the only outstanding feature being the play on which the touchdown was made. On this particular play Tech put the entire Normal team on the ground. We feel confident that the Tech squad has hit its stride and we shall expect them to make a great showing for the remainder of the season. The lineups for the same teams follow: Normal Tech Miles C R. End Hill C Prisgrove R. Tackle Starnes Parks R. Guard LaFevre Baker Center Clark Ralston L. Guard Bynum Thornberry L. Tackle Cahoon Walker L. End Puckett Huffines Quarter Russell Garette R. Half Miller Butts L. Half Watson Freeman Full Jobe PREPS AND CELINA BATTLE TO A 19-19 DEADLOCK The Tech Preps played the Clay County High School on the local field Saturday, Oct. 25. The game resulted in a 19-19 tie. The visitors opened an offensive attack at the very beginning of the game and scored on a pass, which netted 80 yards, in the first three minutes of the play. They scored again on straight football near the end of the second quarter, and on the kickoff which opened the second half. Gipson scored for the Preps in the first quarter. Bassett scored another in the third quarter, and Hughes ended the scoring in the fourth quarter. The Tech defense was very loose during the first half, but they got together in the second half and played a fair brand of football. Haven’t Got Time Of all the excuses there are, By which this old world is accursed, This “Haven’t got time” is by far The poorest, the feeblest, the worst. A delusion it is and a snare, If the habit is yours you should shake it, For if you want to do what is offered to you. You’ll find time to do it, or make it. Y.M.C.A. The Y.M.C.A. was fortunate to have as a speaker one night last week Mr. R.C. Beauty, student state secretary, who gave a splendid address dealing especially on the origin, growth and work of the association. Almost every member was present, both active and associate. All were pleased with Mr. Beaty’s address and expressed their desire to have him visit us again. The Y.M.C.A. is now an active association in every university and college in the United States and has for its aim Christian work and influence to bring the boys closer together. We feel that the T.P.I. association is doing fairly well her part. Let us get behind the officers and make this the best year in the history of the organization in membership and any other helpful way. Poetry Department BACK AGAIN Back from the days of long ago he sometimes comes to me, A littiel lad just ten years old, the lad I used to be. With stomach full of apples green and achings long and wide, A stonebruise on his left hind heel, and sunburns on his hide; With scratches on his well0turned limbs and large and blistered ears, He comes to me in a fancy sweet—myself of yesteryears. --T.J.D. SONNET TO AUTUMN When summer’s warmest breeze has blown away To climes that boast an endless summertime, Where changing seasons always are sublime, And autumn’s coming heralds no decay. When scarlet hues are turning brown and grey, And every insect’s song completes a rhyme; While waving boughs with windmade pantomime Entice the vari-colored elaves astray. Tis then the flaming goldenrod shall fade. And nature’s erstwhile brilliancy be shed In golden floods, that cover every glade With purple carpets, dotted gold and red. So life, with momentary pleasure filled And blest, shall fade and be forever stiled. --B.D.S. STEPS TO SUCCESS It’s doing your job the best you can And being just to your fellow man; It’s making money, but holding friends And staying tru to your aims and ends; It’s figuring how and learning why, And looking forward and thinking high, And dreaming a little and doing much, It’s keeping always in closest touch With what is finest in word and deed; It’s being thorough, yet making speed. It’s daring blithely the field of chance While making labor a brave romance; It’s going onward despite defeat And fighting staunchly, but keeping sweet; It’s being clean and it’s playing fair; It’s luahging lightly ant Dame Despair; It’s looking up at the stars above, And drinking deeply of life and love; It’s struggling on with the will to win But taking loss with a cheerful grin; It’s sharing sorrow and work and mirth And making better this gold old earth; It’s serving striving through strain and stress, It’s doing your noblest –that’s Success. Selected. FRESHMAN COLLEGE The Freshman College class held regular meeting Wednesday, Oct. 15, in the English room. After the reading of the minutes and the business, plans were made for a sunrise breakfast the following morning. Fifty members of the class with Miss Jobe as chaperone, left the campus about daylight and hiked to a spring a mile and a half from town. There a delicious breakfast of bacon, eggs, and coffee was served. Mr. Passons: “Miss Ray, is your theme finished?” Hallie Ray: “Yes, all expect your looking over it and putting in the mistakes.” THE TECH ORACLE Official publication of the students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. STAFF Bryce D. Stone ’26 Editor-in Chief Eleanor Halle ’27 Asst. Ed.-in-Chief Associate Editors: Dewitt T. Puckett ’25 Wit and Humor Shelia Officer ’29 Social Amy Shipley ’28 Class Hallie Ray ’25 Faculty John J. Bell ’26 Exchange Hendon Johnston ’26 Athletic Thos. L. Passons English Alex Shipley Poet Business department: James D. Miller ’27 Business manager Jack Morrison ’26 Assistant Subscription rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY The editorial staff appreciates the splendid manner in which the students are supporting the Oracle, for such action is in keeping with the Tech spirit of former years. A school paper is the composite product of the student body, and its status is determined as much by the general attitude of the students as by the efforts of the staff, so be seen. However, it requires more than momentary enthusiasm to successfully publish as worthwhile school journal, and realizing this, we must again call your attention to the urgency of promptly attending to your subscription. One noteworthy improvement in our school during the past few years may be found in the conduction of our chapel service. Time was when tech students looked upon the chapel hour as a sort of recess or recreation, but now, thanks to the suggestive and perseusaive ability of President Smith, and to the laudable effort of his coworkers, the majority of the students approach the chapel service with an attitude of respectful attention and of reverence. This is indeed commendable, and the casual observer will note that the days of high school deportment have disappeared from our halls forever, and that now we may begin to surround the chapel exercises with an atmosphere of culture, which should become one of the institution’s most cherished traditions. That the wheels of progress are still turning at old Tech is evidenced by the fact that a moving picture machine is soon to be added to our school equipment. This move was fostered by President Smith, who announced that the institution would bear half the cost of the chine if some student organization would assume responsibility for the other half. The Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A. immediately accepted the proposed plan, thereby insuring its early execution. We hope that every student will take advantage of the pleasant and instructive recreation that will surely be afforded by the pictures shown. Music Department GIRLS’ GLEE CLUB The Glee Club has been reorganized for 1924-5 with Miss Tennie Alma Stanton as director, Miss Dannie Wright Harvis secretary, Miss Julia Neal, librarian, Miss Johnnie Bilbrey business manager. This is the first work many of the girls have had in the club, but they are showing up nicely. There are some good solo voices, which Miss Stanton plans to develop later in the year. Those belonging to the Glee Club are: Dannie W. Jarvis, Lilian Pearl Cornwell, Effie Judd, Johnnie Bilbrey, Anne Elizabeth Bracey, Mary Ellen Shanks, Mary Ellen Rash, Dimple Greenwood, Agnes Greenwood, Julia Neal, Eleanor Haile, Elsie Young, Clara Bilbrey, Adelle Crowder, Adina Crowder, Ruby McKeel, Ione Robinson, Gorda Carrington, Daly Starnes, Lucille Cameron, Lucille Thompson, Jessie Barnes. ORCHESTRA The prospects for a good orchestra at Tech this year are fine. Many of the new men have had experience either with the orchestra last year or with the Cookeville Military band. The orchestra is divided as follows: Saxophone, Lauren O’Dell, Charles Cox, James Berry, Clem Allen Womack; trumpet, Douglass Robbins, Mogran Ross; clarinet, Wendell Johnson; trombone, Gilbert Hatfield; guitar, Josh Brown; violin, Benton Cantrell; mandolin, Fred Tardy; drums and traps, Merrill Hughes; director, Miss Tennie Alma Stanton. MUSICAL APPRECIATION Miss Stanton announces that a course in musical appreciation is to be given soon. The Chapel hour on Wednesdays will be devoted to this. The selections used will be either orchestral, vocal, or instrumental. T.P.I. QUARTETTE As there is no Boy’s Glee Club at T.P.I. this year, Miss Stanton has organized the following quartette; Benton Cantrell, bass; Merrill Hughes, Baritone; Luther Puckett, second tenor; Dewiit Puckett, first tenor. D.G.S. CLUB BANQUET The members of the D.G.S. Club entertained on Saturday evening at the City School lunch room with a banquet. The club colors of black, gold and purple were carried out, and the tables were attractive in their decorations of autumn flowers. A delicious five course menu was served. Ed Hudgens was toastmaster and introduced the speakers of the evening, each member being called on for a joke. The young ladies accompanying the club members were also called on for short talks. Mr Charles Cox gave a brief history of the club. “What the Club Stands for,” was given by Henry Carlen. David Terry spoke on “The Aims of the Club.” Lauren O’Dell concluded the program with a speech. The following guests were present: Ed Hudgens and Lillian Pointer; Harry Draper and Ann Elizabeth Bracey; Charles Cox and Hazel Henkins; Henry Carlen and Rozelle Pendergrass; Wendell Johnson and Thelma McCormick; David Terry and Mildred Darwin; Lauren O’Dell and Pearl Cornwell; Robert Cornwell and Reba Isbell; Fred Terry and Willard Johnson; Willie Hudgens and Treva Cooper; Alva Starnes and Alma McCarty; Joe Frank Hudgens and Ninnie Joe Bullock; Jeff Reagan and Effie Judd; Merrill Hughes and Dannie Wright Jarvis; Jimmie Johnson and Dutch Russell. THE FEAR OF BEING GREAT “Sounds a bit odd, doesn’t it? Suggests some slip of the typewriter, or the printer’s mistake? The fear of being great?” “Why, bless you,” you exclaim, we’re not afraid of being great.” Nothing of the sort. You’re afraid to be great. That’s what is the matter with you. And so long as that fear has right of way in the organization of you, you won’t be great. But I can’t be harsh with you. There are excuses for this for of a sufferer, greatly misunderstood, greatly embattled, greatly aloof and alone. To be great is to have one’s visage marred more than any man, and one’s form more than the sons of man. I hardly can blame you for not wishing to pay the price. Washington paid it. And Lincoln. Both were greatly great, because greatly beset and buffeted. Read the letters of Hamilton entreating Washington to accept the Presidency when the Greatheart shrunk from the task with an utter shrinking. The dark days of the war –defeats, impoverishments, disloyalties; domestic treason and foreign levy –had worn him down; so that now he cried out for ease from the burden. Nor were they cried without cause. No President than he was ever so savagely vilified. And Lincoln! Man of sorrows, man acquainted with grief. The show of his countenance witnesses for him in the matter. Costly the price he paid. The deep sorrowful eyes of him, and the stricken face tell the story. It is known of all. We leave it to the reader as to what might be said of Woodrow Wilson. Yes. You’re afraid to be great; afraid to stand alone. You choose to be like others, float with the tide; go with the crowd, swallowed in a gregarious nonentity! That’s the herding instinct which deteriorates men into cattle. It’s the easiest way. And will keep your soul scrawny forever --Blue Ridge Voice John: “I love a girl like you.” Annie Lee: (Jealously) “Who is she?” SENIOR HIGH OFFICERS The Senior High School class met Wednesday, October 15, and elected the following officers, who were not elected the other meeting: Sergeant-at-Arms –Joe Frank Hudgens. Cheer Leader—Keene. Class Sponsor –Miss Tennie Alma Stanton. With all these good officers the class should do the best of work, and strive to have the best all round class that has ever graduated from Tech High school. The class has planned a program to be given o Senior Chapel day. The following committee was selected to name the members of the class to serve: Lola Massa, Ellen Jared and Dimple Greenwood. Y.W.C.A. The services of the Y.W.C.A. are being carried on in a very pleasant manner. We have morning watch every morning and meetings on Wednesday evenings. The following programs have been rendered: Wednesday, Oct. 15 Song –Y.W.C.A. Prayer –Auby Scott. Music –Alberta Cassety. Life of Christ –Miss Jobe. Song –Y.W.C.A. Y.W.C.A. Benediction Wesnesday, Oct. 22 Song No. 36 –All. Prayer –Eunice Minor. Duet –Sedivak and Robinson. Talk –Ruby McKeel. Song No. 58 –All. Y.W.C.A Benediction The Y.W. had charge of the vesper service Sunday afternoon, which was very interesting. The program was: Bible Reading –Ruby McKeel Prayer –Benton Cantrell. Reading –Jane Robinson. Miss Clyde Jackson gave a splendid talk about her trip to the Y.W.C.A. conference at Blue Ridge N.C. We are glad indeed to have Miss Jobe as our sponsor. She is putting forth every effort to make the Y.W.C.A. a success this year. SOPHMORE COLLEGE The Sophomore college class went on their annual picnic Wednesday, October 15, going to Cummins Falls. This was the first social event of the season given by any class. Mr. and Mrs. Childress chaperoned the party, as Mr. Henderson, the sponsor, was unable to go. At six o’clock a roaring fire was built on the gravel beach by the old mill. The cold wind moaned through the pines and the light f the fire shimmered across the ripping water of the little creek, showing the dark, yawning mouth of a large cavern. The stillness of the night accentuated the voices of the care-free sophs, who were roasting wieners to a golden brown, and sometimes to a black crust. The ancient coffee pot boiled merrily. After supper a “joke contest” was held. Mr. Childress was awarded the prize as the best humorist. JUNIOR HIGH The Junior High School class met Wednesday, Oct. 22, in their regular class room. Our officers for this year are as follows: President –Bailey Bockman. Vice President –Elizabeth Ensor. Secretary –Ewell Watson. Treasurer –Donnell Ferrell. Sergeant-at-Arms –Claude Jackson, Henry F. Carlen Song Leader –Dan Jarvis. Sponsor –Mr. Hilliard Mr. Hilliard met with us and we had an unusually interesting meeting. More members were present this meeting than we have had heretofore. Mr. Hilliard made an excellent talk and we feel sure that we have the very best sponsor that can be had and we are going to do everything in our power to make this our most successful year. As we have the privilege of having such a good sponsor we want to show him, as well as the other classes and members of the faculty that the Juniors can and will. Ban McDearman: “You are certainly a good looking girl.” Miss Larkin: “Sorry, but I can’t return the compliment.” Ban McD: (Prolonged silence) Shelia: “What does transatlantic mean, father?” Mr. Officer: “Across the Atlantic, of course. Trans always means across.” Shelia: “Then I supposed a trans parent means a cross parent.”

1924 November 1

 We Are Working For A Bigger And Better Tech. Are You? THE TECH ORACLE SOCIETIES PREPARE FOR ANNUAL DEBATE Question Resolved, That the Muscle Shoals Power Plant Should be Leased to a Private Interest. The annual debate for this year, between the Sherwood and Upper Cumberland literary societies, will be staged on Friday evening. April 10. The question for discussion this year is, Resolved, That the Muscle Shoals power plant should be leased to a private interest. The Upper Cumberland who chose to uphold the affirmative, will be represented by Mssrs. Benton Mr. Carr and John M. Frazier. The Sherwoods taking the negative, are to be representative by Messrs. Dewitt T. Puckett and Benton Cantrell. All four of these men are college students, three of them being of the class of ’25. All are men of mature judgment and exceptionally able speakers. All are men of varied experience in literary society and educational work. Each one of the four is a former school teacher. Mr. Frazier, who claims Cleveland, Tenn., as his habitat, is a Tech graduate of the class of ’29. For the last two years he has been principal of the Clarkrange, Tnn, High School. Also, he attended Peabody in the Summer of 1924. He returns to Tech this year to complete the third-year-course. Mr. Carr,a native of our neighbor county, Overton, is a member of the Freshman College Class and a teacher and debater of wide experience. He represented the Upper Cumberland society in the annual debate in 1924. Mr. Puckett who proudly claims our neighboring hamlet, Silver Point, as his home, is likewise a Tech graduate of former years, finishing in 1924. He was a member of the faculty of Baxter Seminary in 1923-4. He also attended Peabody College in the Summer of () 1924. He represented the Sherwoods in the annual debate of 1928. Mr. Cantrell, who hails from Fentress county, famous as the home of Sergeant Alvin C. York, also graduating from Tech in 1923. In 1923-4 he was principal of the school at Twinton, Tenn. Therefore, it can readily be seen that the debate will not lag for lack of talent. The winning team will be awarded the Womack loving cup and will be entitled to hold it one year. The cup is now held by their Sherwoods their team having been victorious in 1924. The judges this year will be members of the faculty of the University of Tennessee. ALUMNI NEWS Henry Barger was here recently in the interest of the Tech Alumni Association, of which he is president. Mr. Barger still works with his old time “pep” and enthusiasm, in spite of the fact that he has just finished a forty five day session with the state legislature. We were glad to have him visit the school and speak to us at the chapel service. Victor McClain, at Tech graduate now working in New York City sends in his subscription to the Oracle with the following comment: “Am pleased to note that some of the old pep and spirit is getting back into the student body. May () your tournament become a great success.” We are glad to report tht the tournament was indeed a success. It might also be well to remark that we appreciate Mr. McClain’s interest in the school and its activities. His is an attitude that should prevail with every Tech alumnus. We need more like him. Harry Jenkins of Vanderbilt University has the following to say in regard to the Oracle of this year: “You are to be congratulated on the splendid progress you have made with the Oracle. This issue (the Freshman issue) is certainly an improvement over anything attempted last year, and there is no reason why Tech and Tech students should not be proud of their paper. It certainly seems that it is going to prove the success that was predicted for it last year –and no one is more interested in its advance than I.” It will be remembered that Mr. Jenkins was the first editor-in-chief of the Oracle and as such was an important factor in its early success. Ross Burton of the Institute class of 1920 is now practicing law in Miami, Florida. He is remembered by all old Tech students as an enthusiastic society worker, and a good student. Bonnie Hudson, graduate from Tech High School in 1921, is now a student at Maryville College. Ina Scott, class of ’21, is holding a position as dietician in the Presbyerian Hospital at New Orleans, La. Clemma Masters and Dero Darwin, (now Mr. and Mrs. D.A. Darwin), graduates from the Technical High School in 1922, are living happily together “down on the farm,” near Gainesboro. Bernice Wright, one time “Beau Brummel” of Tech, and a High School graduate in the class of 1920, is studying medicine in Memphis, Tenn. Editor’s Note: This Column of our paper is devoted exclusively to the interests of the alumni of the institution, and we shall be glad to print contributions from any graduate of Tech. GOLDEN EAGLES TRIUMPH OVER C.H.M.A. On Monday, Feb. 16, the Tech “Golden Eagles” journeyed to Lebanon and handed the Castle Heights quintet the smaller end of a 29-21 count.the game was fast and clean throughout. Wilson and McCracken were the stars for the Heights. Blount and Poteet were the scoring aces for Tech, while Alcorn was a bear in defense. Lineups: Tech Pos. C.H.M.A. Clark (2) F Wilson (6) Blount (7) F Selby (5) Jobe (6) C Jordan Winningham (6) G Cook (4) Alcorn (1) G Briston Substitutions: Tech –Poteet (7) for Clark. Heights –Gordon for Selby; Bristow for Jordan; McCracken (6) for Cook; Smith for Bristow. TECH SWAMPED BY S.P.U. On Saturday night, Feb. 21, the far-famed Jess Neely brought his basketeers from S.P.U. to town and carried away the cup of victory through a 30-13 margin Alexander was the shining light of the game, scoring 12 points and pulling some very comical stunts. The first half ended with S.P.U. holding a 14-12 lead, but Tech was only able to register one point in the latter period. Joe Davis, a former Tech gridster, was on the visiting team and played well. Lineups: Tech Pos. S.P.U. Clark F Newton (6) Blount (6) F Perrine (4) Jobe (4) C Alexander (12) Winningham (1) G Wilson (4) Puckett (1) G Gardner Substitutions: Tech –Poteet (1) for Puckett; Carr for Poteet; Poteet for Clark; Puckett for Carr; Clark for Winningham. S.P.U. –Davis (4) for Perrine; Hall for Gardner. The Y.W. Tea Room is open every day from 12 to 1. Come. Y.M.C.A. PRESENTS INTERESTING PROGRAM The Y.M.C.A. meets on each Wednesday evening. Much interest is being shown this term as we have good numbers and good interest at each meeting. February 18, at the regular meeting the leaders were John Frazier, C.W. Davis, Benton Carr. Each made interesting talks. The president appointed for the following Wednesday night as leaders. Benton Cantrell and Ban McDearman. They also responded with interesting speeches. It might be of interest to know that every boy in the dormitories is a member of this organization and stands ready to help put over any movement that the student body may advocate. We believe in the old adage, “In unity is strength,” and we see that is proven even by the membership of this organization. Y.W.C.A. The Y.W.C.A. meeting was held in the parlor of the girls’ dormitory Wednesday evening, February 18, 1925. The following program was given: Song All Prayer Mary Tom Johnson Music Velma Murphy Poem Mildred McDearman After some business was taken up the benediction was led by Clara Bilbrey. The moving picture machine is now in operation. “The Old Homestead” was shown Friday, February 13th, in the auditorium, which was almost filled with the students and patrons of the school. Every one seemed to enjoy the picture together with the music furnished by the Joyland Six. A beautiful service was given on Sunday afternoon to commemorate Washington’s birthday. Patriotic songs were sung. Martial music was given by Miss Velma Murphy. “The American Flag” by Mary Frances McDearman, and Mr. Willis gave an inspiring talk on hero worship. TOURNAMENT PROVES A HOWLING SUCCESS Every Game Cleanly Played. Gladeville Wins Banner Games Well Attended The annual Upper Cumberland Valley Basketball Tournament, which was held by the T.P.I. A.A. Feb. 19, 20, 21, was in every phase a howling success. The sealing capacity of the local gym was far from ample to accommodate the enormous crowds who wished to see the games, and in consequence many had to stay outside. The conduct of all persons concerned is to be commended, as not a single disturbance or hindrance arose throughout the entire period either on, or off the playing floor. Not once was a decision of any official questioned, by player or coach. The first play period started at 2:30 p.m. Thursday, and the last was held at 2:00 p.m., Saturday. On Friday at 11:30, representatives of the various teams met and perfected the organization of the Upper Cumberland Valley Athletic Association, and drew up a set of resolutions to express their appreciation of the courtesies shown them and their teams by T.P.I. and Cookeville at large. The tournament was won by Gladeville High, with Algood High as the runner-up. The Gladeville team is coached by William Beasley, a former resident of this city. The players of the winning team forwards; Dobson, center; R. Evans and Drennans, guards. The Algood team is coached by Silas Anderson, a former student and athlete at T.P.I., and his players were: Phy (c), Freeman and Williford, forwards; Bilyeu and McCormick, center; Deck, Matheny and Swallows, guards. It can be said from a neutral standpoint that the best team won, as the winners were forced to play the four best teams in the entire tournament. The winners went through the entire four games without a substitution, and this is certainly no trifle, for not often does a team play even two games without having men disqualified by personal fouls. Perhaps the two fastest games of the tournament were played between Alpine and Gladeville, and Algood and Gladeville, the latter necessitating an extra period to decide the play. Farmer of Gladeville was the scoring ace of the tournament, having 62 points to his credit in four games. Freeman was next with 25 in four games, while Judd got 23 in three games. The all tournament teams, as selected by the referee were: () First Pos Second Player Team Player Team Farmer Gladev F Poston, Livstn Judd, Baxter F Freeman, Algood C. Vaughn Alpine C L Acuff, Spr. H. Evans, Glade G R. Vaughn Al. Mitchell, Mont. G R. Evans, Glade Team Committed Free Shoes Missed Free Shots Field Goals Points Games Spencer 2 42 17 8 21 24 T.P.I. Preps 1 15 4 7 9 11 Gladeville 4 97 40 17 23 17 Livingston 1 23 11 1 7 9 Alpine 2 59 25 9 11 14 Sparta 1 10 5 0 8 10 Monterey 3 59 22 15 22 20 Celina 1 15 5 5 3 10 Shop Springs 1 19 6 7 2 9 Algood 4 87 40 7 28 24 Baxter 2 49 19 11 13 15 Gainesboro 1 17 8 1 3 13 Central High 1 12 5 2 2 0 The highest score made by any team in a single game was by Alpine, 42. The lowest score in any single game, Monterey, 9. Most field goals in single game, Alpine, 18. Least number field goals in single game, Monterey, 3. Most free shots in one game, Baxter, 8. Most fouls committeed in single game, Celina, 13. Least number fouls committed in single game Central High, 0. Most points by single man, Farmer, 64. Most field goals by one man, Farmer, 29. Most fouls by one man, Farmer, 29. Most fouls by one man, Farmer, 10. The officials of the tournament were: Smith, referee; Blount, timer; Johnston, scorer; McDearman, announcer. Poet’s Corner Backward, tutu backward O time in thy flight, May I see her again, as I saw her one night; Heavenly blue eyes, they spoke with a smile. Give her to me, please, just for a while; Charmed by her smiles and fairness of face. The idol of my dreams, she’s queen of the race. --Alex Shipley TO A BLONDE O little blonde of airy grace, Your winning smile won’t go to waste; Your gray blue eyes of limpid light. They shine as twinkling stars at night. The lashes veiling pools of light Are like the darkening shades of night, O fairy blonde of lovers dreams. Your angel face like sunshine beams. Appeal, you have with unknown power; Attentions on you all do shower. Don’t tear his castle down today. You have him hooked, so let him play. --Alex Shipley TO A FLAPPER Blessings on thy little head, Flapper girl with lips of red. I would not call the lost and wild Independent, modern child Thou hast downed convention’s rules Some have called thee reckless fool But I praised thee, little sport Thou art sweet, and goo as heart Let them scorn thee, flapper girl Martyr to a narrow world. Twas ever thus that new-born clan. Be blamed and doomed by skeptic man. --Exchange INDIAN ROMANCE A frisky young buck from the Sioux An Indian maiden tried to wioux But her father, the bute. Tried to shute the galute. Said the Sioux, “I am thrioux.” But a little bit later the Sioux Took courage and said, “Oh, pioux, pioux, I’ll elope with the maid To some beautiful glade.” Harry Draper: “Bobbie, my heart itches for you.” Bobbie Vaughn: “well, why don’t you scratch?” Dangerous The lights had been turned out and all was darkness in the East Hall. From the room occupied by Tardy and Bruce there came sounds indicating that a battle royal was taking place. President Smith entered and turned his flashlight on the pair of wrestlers. Bruce: “Men have been killed for less than that.” President Smith: “Ahem; two young men are apt to be killed if this noise doesn’t stop.” Pat: “I call your daughter Sunmaid.” Mike: “Why-er-the raisin?” Pat: “She was the first my Sunkist.” Engineering Mr. Henderson: “Hendon, what signal does the instrument man give the rodman when he has taken the reading?” Hendon: “He goes up and down.” Puckett: “My brain is my fortune.” Pearl: Well, poverty is no disgrace.” Ban: “What about the capacity of Leyden jars –or do they have capacity?” Mr. Barnes: “Yes, they have capacity, just as a pint-bottle does.” “What could be more sad than a man without a county.” Mrs. Morton: “A country without a man.” Stone: “When I leave college I will not owe any one a cent.” John Barksdale: “What an awful time to leave.” Mr. Barnes in Physics class; “When will water stop running down hill?” Ban: “When it gets to the bottom.” Mr. Passons (in English class): “Name three prominent poets studied this term.” Miss Carrington (afflicted with bunion): “Dickens, Howit, Burns.” And continue to make eyes gioux, gloux.” And while in the glade they did cioux. Those tioux in their lone rendervioux He said, “I knioux not I could love such a lot.” And an owl flioux by and said “whionx?” --Exchange Dale Lee was sporting a new shirt when Blondie asked: “How many yards does it take to make a shirt like that?” Dale: “I got three shirts like this out of one yard last night.” Clifford: “Boy, doesn’t Effie look spirituelle in that gown?” Jimmie: “Well, er, I’ll admit there isn’t much of the material about her.” Mr. Passons (after winning a lawsuit: “Well, I’ve proved that you are crazy, and you are thanks to a me, a free man. My fee is $1,000.” Benton Carr; “But I’m not that crazy.” Count McKey and Ban McDearman on train. “enter robbers with guns drawn: “Hands up, everybody.” Ban: “Here, Count, I’ll pay that five I owe you.” Dean Smith (in English history): “Mr. Murphy, how did the Danes cross the English channel?” Murphy: “On horses.” James Carlen: “Give me a sentence of three words meaning ecstacy.” Ed Hudgens: “Pass in chemistry.” “Sweets for the sweet,” said Frances Huffman as she handed Miss Jarmon a sack of lemons. Great was the fall thereof when Mr. Davis fell for “B” White, in the Tech dining hall. DEGREES: ZERO Mrs. Mr. M. A. N. P. a. B. S. NOTICE We appreciate the mention given us by the Tech Oracle. We wish to announce “that” we are known as “The Joyland Six,” and not as the “Hughes Joyland Six.” JOYLAND SIX. GRADUATING CLASS OF 1919 Although a small number gruadating this year, we gain an inspiration when we hear one of its members mentioned, because of the great work each has done and continues to do. This class was composed of Ben H. Murphy, Lilian Johnston, Naomi Ensor, Elise Davis and Alva Wright. Mr. Murphy since leaving Tech has acquired an M.A. degree from Peabody and is now connected with the elementary department of Davis Lipscomb College. Miss Johnston, who taught for two years at Gordonsville, is now in Peabody. Miss Davis is teaching in Manchester. Miss Ensor, who has a B.S. from Peabody, is teaching in Kentucky. Of course, it wouldn’t be natural if some member of the class did not realize that she had a mission of helping some one else make life worth while. Miss Wright married soon after leaving Tech and is now living in one of the Northern states. VALENTINE PARTY The faculty, Palladians and Upper Cumberlands were honor quests at a valentine party given Saturday night, February 14, by the Belles Lettres and Sherwood societies. The guests upon arrival assembled in the auditorium where a mock faculty meeting was in progress. This unusual feature showed up to a good advantage the talent in the two respective societies. One of the most interesting events of the evening was the heart contest. In this Miss Mary Frances McDearman received the prize for being the most popular young lady, while the booby prize was awarded Miss Lucille Lee. Partners for refreshments were found by matching hearts, a delicious ice course being servd by a bevy of Belles Lettres girls. A color scheme of red and white was very appropriately carried out. The auditorium was gorgeous in its decoration of streamers and heart. Streamers carried from windows to the center of the room hung in a heavy fringe, which resembled a huge chandelier. Eight mountains in British Columbia have been discovered and ascended by a University of Chicago professor and a New York engineer. One of the peaks, yet unnamed, ranks among the highest in the Canadian Northwest. THE UPPER CUMBERLAND LITERARY SOCIETY The Upper Cumberland Literary Society met Monday, Feb. 16, with their colleagues, the Palladians. The principle feature of the program was a debate: “Resolved, That powder and paint do more harm than good.” W.Q. Lowe and Clifford Massa represented the affirmative. Miss Mary Frances McDearman and Miss Willard Johnson represented the negative. The young ladies traced cosmetics back to ancient times, declaring that the Queen of Sheba used powder and paint excessively and she “vamped” the wisest man in the world. The young men discussed cosmetics as being injurious to health. The judges rendered their decision in favor of the negative. At the close of the program President Hudgens of the Upper Cumberlands of the Upper Cumberlands read a list of the medal and prizes to be awarded this year. He urged every member to either enter one of the contests themselves or to assist the contestants in every way possible. We believe this year will be the most successful year in the history of the Upper Cumberland society. Many of our members have entered the contests for the medals and prizes; every member has pledged his support to the contestants; and all of us are eagerly looking forward to see the full fruition of our labors and our hopes. BLACK BARTLEMY PIRATE By Elise Gregory Once upon a time, in the long ago days of real pirates with peglegs and real treasures; there lived in England a noble lord—Lord Bartlemy of London, Lord Bartlemy was a tall, handsome young man with black hair and keen black eyes. His uncle owned a large estates out from London and it was upon one of these estates that Lord Bartlemy spent much of his time. On the estate next to this lived Elaine, a beautiful maiden that Bartlemy had lovd since childhood. When he was at the estate these two spent many happy golden hours together. Elaine loved Bartlemy, too, and had given him her promise of marriage when he came into full possession of the vast estates. Now Lord Bartlemy’s uncle had deeded all his property to his nephew but when he died the legal adviser, who was Elaine’s father claimed that no deed was made and took over the property himself. To get Bartlemy out of the way he worked out a plot that put him on board a pirate ship that was bound for the South Pacific. Lord Bartlemy, dregged and gagged, began to come to himself when the ship was two days out at sea. His first vision was a dark little room with rats running about. The room had no furniture except the bed, and hardly any ventilation. The odors stifled him. While he was trying to imagine where he was, when the door opened and the queerest looking little man came in. he loosed Bartlemy and in answer to his questions Bartlemy found that he was on board the “Black Flag,” the most dreaded pirate ship that sailed the ocean. The next day Lord Bartlemy was put to work. Although he had never worked in his life he did the best that he could and soon won the respect of everyone, even the hard-hearted captain. Realizing the situation Bartlemy came to hate all mankind, even the beautiful Elaine; because he felt that she, too, had had part in the plot that had reduced him to poverty and piracy. He determined to trust no man again and to do all in his power against mankind. This attitude was very becoming to a pirate and as the weeks rolled by he began to be a real, sure enough pirate. On the fourth week at sea the “Black Flag” attacked a passing vessel and conquered it, but it had the misfortune to have its own captain severely wounded the captain called Bartlemy to his side and gave him the charts that told where to find a great treasurer on an island they were bound for. He told Bartlemy to take charge of the “Black Flag” and gave him the name of “Black Bartlemy,” captain of the famous “Black Flag.” He died a few hours afterward. The next day “Black” Bartlemy was looking through the list that had been taken from the other hip and he came across a book, “love Ballads.” He started to throw it overboard but decided to inspect it. When he opened the cover the single name “Elaine” stared at him. With most eyes and trembling hands he turned the pages and read her favorite ballads. And hour later one of the other pirates was surprised to find his captain, “Black” Bartlemy, with a parrot on each shoulder, his clothing dirty and disorderly, and actually crying over “Love Ballds.” That night he called all of them together and told them of the great treasure that was now his but that he would give it all to them if they would turn the ship back and take him back to England. They gladly consented. A month later the “Black Flag” sailed into London harbor and the Bartlemy that got got off was an entirely changed Bartlemy to the one that got on less than two months before. He inquired for Elaine and found that she was still living at the old estate. Her father had died suddenly and upon going through his papers she had found the deed that made all the property Bartlemy’s.he found that she , herself, had been searching for him to turn the property over and had been on board the ship that the “Black Flag” attacked, but had barely escaped. He hurried out to see her and what happened when they meet no one knows, but we have been told they lived happily ever after. AS WE SEE OTHERS The Trident, Milligan College, Johnson City, Tenn. We are glad to receive this exchange. Your magazine is well-balanced and interesting. Why not try a few stories? The Babbler. David Lipscomb College, Nashville, Tenn. A very “newsy” paper that shows good support from the student body. The Purple and Gold C.H.S, Clarksville, Tenn. A snappy, well edited school journal. We enjoy reading your interesting stories. Your jokes are specially clver and new. The Cardinal Ogden College, Bowling Green, Ky. Your magazine is rather small. Couldn’t you enlarge each department? A few more jokes would also help. The Echo, Hume-Fogg High School. Nashville, Tenn. You have an exceptionally good magazine which is strong in all departments. Your cover design is very striking as are your stories and locals. TH ORACLE ALPHABET Always pay your subscription. Boost your paper. Cooperate by giving news of interest. Don’t know your paper. It hurts school spirit. Energy can be used for the Oracle. Forget your worries by reading your school paper. Go to Jimmie Miller with your 50 cents (each term). Help those who are doing the work. Imagine a school without a paper. Jealousy does more harm than good. Keep up with the news of your school. Love clean jokes. Make your paper worth while. Never leave work for the other fellow. Open your eyes to good literature. Place the paper above reproach. Quarrel with no one through the paper. Remember your duty to the school. Support the school by supporting the Oracle. To help your fellow man is best. Use good sense in suggesting improvements. Very little is asked of your, so give it cheerfully. Wit and wisdom are needed by the paper. Xtra large number of subscribers wanted. Yonder is the future, take care of the present. Zeal is always useful. THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Printed by Herald Publishing Co. Entered as Second Class matter at the Cookeville Post Office. STAFF Bryce D. Stone ’26 Editor-in-Chief Eleanor Haile ’27 Asst. Ed.-in-Chief Associate Editors: Dewitt T. Puckett ’25 Wit and Humor Shelia Officer ’29 Social Amy Shipley ’28 Class Hallie Ray ’25 Faculty Hendon Johnston ’26 Athletic Thos. L. Passons English Alex Shipley Poet Edwin McKay Exchange Rose Dow Alumni Business Department: James D. Miller ’27 Business Manager Jack Morrison ’28 Assistant Lee S. Darwin Circulation Manager Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY The citizens of Cookeville are to be commended on the splendid manner in which they cooperated with those in charge of arrangements for the tournament. They aided the housing committee by inviting the students from the dormitories to their homes in order to make room for the visitors. They added materially in financing the undertaking by patronizing every game. The Polytechnic Institute is fortunate in being located in such a progress and public spirited town. How have you spent your time during the term? Of course, you have met classes and handed in a few papers and reports that were thought necessary at the time, but are you ready to meet the test? “Exams” are the crises of your college training. They should be proof of the work and evidence of its benefits to the student. Prove that you have the necessary pluck and stamina for the pinches by passing the “finals.” Tech needs a new gymnasium. One of the effects of the tournament was to emphasize this already keenly felt need. The department of physical education is recognized by modern educators as being of vital importance to the proper development of the student, yet we at Tech have less equipment for this branch of education than for any other. For the past two years we have been renting the city school gymnasium, but this is only a makeshift at best. We should have a first class gymnasium, modern and scientifically equipped. This would require quite a sum of money, which could hardly be raised in an instant, but the movement must be begun sometime, so why not now? Why should not the Alumni Association interest itself in the forwarding of the movement? STUDENTS NOTICE! Among the many qualities necessary to make a fine student body, the support given to the various school activities is a most prominent one. In looking over the record of who’s who one the subscription list of the Oracle, we find that the percentage of subscribers is very low, when compared with the size of the student body. In as much as the Oracle is now entered as second class matter at the Cookeville post office, and each issue is mailed out to day students, every subscriber is assured of receiving a copy of the paper. There will be six issues of the Oracle during the spring term, and the last will be a souvenir, sponsored by the Senior classes of the institution. This souvenir promises to be one of the best editions ever sent out from the school, as it is being planned along lines usually considered in the publication of school annuals. Each subscriber will receive a copy of this souvenir, no charge being made other than the regular term subscription. Let’s support the school paper; let’s support the Seniors who are working to make the souvenir a success. During the first week of the spring term, each student will be called upon to cooperate in this work with a paid up subscription to the Oracle at the regular rate of fifty cents per term. Don’t be a slacker. Have your fifty cents ready. JAMES D. MILLER Business Manager Oracle; HARRY DRAPER, Business Managers Souvenir. TO OUR EXCHANGES We will appreciate any criticism that might help us to make the Oracle bigger and better. We wish to see ourselves as others see us. The following exchanges have been received: The Cardinal, Ogden College, Bowling Green Ky. The Trident, Milligan College The Babbler, Davis Lipscomb College, Nashville, Tenn. The Purple and Gold, Clarksville High School, Clarksville, Tenn. The Booster, Shop Springs, Tenn. The Echo, Hume-Fogg High School. Nashville, Tenn. The Central Star, Dickson Central High, Dickson, Tenn. The Bayonet, T.M.I, Sweetwater, Tenn. RESOLUTIONS At a meeting of the coaches of the various teams represented in the Upper Cumberland Valley Basketball Tournament held in Cookeville, Tennessee, under the auspices of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, on February 19, 20, 21, 1925. The following resolutions were adopted: First: Be it resolved, that we thank President Q.M. Smith of the Tennessee. Polytechnic Institute for his interest in the high schools of this section and for making possible the holding of this tournament under the auspices of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Second: Be It Further Resolved, that we thank T.P.I. as a whole: First for the magnanimous spirit of the students of the boys’ dormitory, for giving up their rooms to the visiting teams; Second, for the excellent dining hall service: Third, for the courtesy of the entire student body of T.P.I. Third: Be it Further Resolved That we thank Coach Overall for his interest and enthusiasm in conducting this tournament and his leadership in organizing a permanent Upper Cumber and Valley Athletic Association. Fourth: Be It Further Resolved, That we thank the City School of Cookeville for the use of the gymnasium during the tournament. Fifth: Be it Further Resolved, That we thank Referee Smith and his assistants for their untiring efforts in conducting the games in a manner that gave unanimous satisfaction. Seventh: Be it Further Resolved, That we commend the conduct and good sportsmanship of all teams in the tournament. Eighth: Be it Further Resolved That we place our stamp of approval upon the permanent organization of the Upper Cumberland Valley Athletic Association, as effected during this tournament. Ninth: Be it Further Resolved,That we pledge to T.P.I. our hearty cooperation and efforts in her future growth and development. Tenth: Be It Further Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the local paper for publication, a copy to the President’s office, a copy to the visiting teams, and that a copy be read in chapel at T.P.I. Eleventh: Be It Finally Resolved, That we thank all spectators for their sportsmanlike conduct at all games. Emmett Smartt, Baxter Seminary., He.E. Scott, Spencer. DeWitt T. Puckett, T.P.I. Preps. Joel Barnes, Sparta. Moss Farmer, Alpine. J.G. Wilhite, Livingston. Wm M. Beasley, Gladeville. J.E. Walker, Monterey. G.B. Thackston, Celina. W.B. Overton, Gainesboro. Sllas Anderson, Algood. E.H. Davis, Shop Springs. Lewis Loftis, Cookeville. NOW YOU TELL ONE They were discussing ways and means of getting down off an elephant. “Well, how do you get down?” asked Bob. “You climb down, of course.” “No,” replied his friend, Tom. “Well, you grease his sides and slide down,” suggested the other. “Wrong again,” insisted Tom. “Then you take a ladder, if one is handy, and get down?” was the next suggestion. “No” “Well, you slide down his trunk.” “No, you ass; you don’t get down off an elephant. You get it off a duck.” –Exchange. A PROPHECY OF THE OFFICERS OF THE PALLADIAN, LITERARY SOCIETY On a recent trip to England I had many pleasing experiences and saw much beautiful scenery but what interested me most was a visit to an old, old house. This house was made historical by the fact that many years ago an old man, of whom the village people knew very little, lived there. All that the people knew about him was that he was very wealthy, having many carriages, a beautiful mansion, and frequent visits to the old man. The many servants kept around the house were just as mysterious as their master. The village people knew nothing more of this quaint old man except that when he died, his wealthy friends and visitors carried him away in state leaving the old house as he had left it in the hands of the servants. They never told the secret until years afterwards, when the guide called us all to him and said in low, mysterious tones, “We have now come to the secret of the old house and if you are interested enough in finding it out to pay the amount of money we ask of all the visitors that come here and wish to know the secret, I will be glad to do my best in explaining it. Of course, we were all excited when he told us this and were perfectly willing to pay the money, which was just a mere sum to be used in the upkeep of the house and grounds. The guide then led the way into a smaller hall, very dimly lighted. We followed the hall until we came to a very small door which the guide easily opened but we were greatly surprised upon entering to find ourselves facing a large door just inside the smaller one. The guide lifted the knocker and in a few minutes the door slowly opened as if by itself. We entered and to our amazement found ourselves in a medium size room dimly lighted and upon looking around dressed in gray. The guide told us to be seated and then explained to us that this was the room that was kept secret because it was in this room the former owner interpreted the future, aided by his wealthy friends. He then asked if any of us had any old friends that we were interested in enough to want to see their position in life ten years from now. At this all of us tried to answer at once, so something had to be done. The guide then said he would begin at the left and as I was near the center I made myself comfortable so I could watch the proceedings. We were all wondering what would happen next when all of a sudden one end of the room began to move (so we thought) but it was only a curtain that we had not noticed being there. We then saw before us a beautiful woman in a white robe. She said the members of our party that sat on the left whom he wished to see. But this would not be interesting to you all as you would know none of them, so I will tell what happened when my turn came. I had been thinking of some one to ask about when suddenly I thought of my dear old society, the Palladians; but of course I could not ask to see every member for the other members of the party would grow impatient, so I decided would be best to only ask to see the officers: So when the beautiful lady said it was my turn I said, “Well, I would like to see the officers of the Palladian Literary Society of 1925. The first was the president, Miss Catherine Hargis.” Then there appeared before me a room in a kindergarten, through the windows the sun was shining brightly, about fifteen little children sat in a circle around their teacher. She was telling them a story. But I hardly recognized the teacher, whom the woman told me was Catherine, for she was almost white-headed. This surprised me very much and when I asked the reason of the great change I was told that was due to so much grieving over the fact that she had heard of the marriage of James Miller to someone else, so she had settled down to her old hobby as teacher in a kindergarten. I would liked to have learned more about Catherine but lack of time prevented it. So the next vision was of Miss Bill Johnson, the vice-president. Her situation seemed to be very pleasant. At that hour she was entertaining a few of her friends at tea in her beautiful little home in Baxter. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Terry I was glad to see Bill so happy and still smiling as she had smiled so many times at Tech, even at times when she could not find Fred. The picture changed then to a scene in California. It was a music room in the University of California. At the piano sat a very modest looking young lady attired in white. At once I recognized my old friend and secretary of Palladian Literary Society, Miss Jonnie Bilbrey. I learned that her greatest wish had been fulfilled, that of graduating from the New England Conservatory of Music. She seemed very happy at her work and, although thousands of miles from home she wasn’t nearly so homesick as she was when, she first left Algood and came to stay in the dormitory at T.P.I. , and then she was allowed to make her journey of four miles to her home in Algood for every week-end. I would have gazed longer at this pleasant scene but just now it shifted and there was before me the inside of a large building in New York, and there, performing before a vast audience, was a beautiful girl attired in the latest gown from Paris. I soon recognized the treasurer of the Palladian Literary Society, Miss Lillian Pointer. She had just returned from a successful three months tour through Europe. I learned that although she had lost Clifford Massa to someone else, she was contented with singing away her cares as well as those of her audience. The next scene was that of a beautiful homestead in Mississippi. While I watched closely I saw a stately young lady emerge from the door. It did not take me long to recognize the critic of Palladian Literary Society, Miss Anna Elizabeth Bracey, known at T.P.I. as “Sis,” but known in Nashville as Mrs. Jones Maxon. Although “Sis” tried to look as dignified as er position required, she could not resist the temptation of grinning as she did at Tech, for she was to meet Jones that afternoon when the train rolled in at the station. He had just the day before brought his men to a glorious football victory. “Sis” stepped into a waiting car and was carried quickly away. So was the vision that I could have gazed upon forever, but as “Sis” completed the list of officers of Palladian Literary Society, I had to be contented because the other members of the party were growing impatient. The rest of my visit in England was exceedingly happy because I was convinced of the happiness of five of my schoolmates at old Tech and fellow members of the Palladian Literary Society. Dimple Greenwood. PATRONIZE ORACLE ADVERTISERS.  

1925 March 2

 What Are YOU Doing for Tech? THE TECH ORACLE TECH DEFEATS CARDINALS 12-6 Ogden Game Played in the Mud At last the age old maxim that like breeds like has run true to form in Tech football history. Vanderbilt football teams are known the South over for their brainy playing for their smartness and alertness. Tech’s coaches are Vanderbilt products and have been doing their utmost to install that same spirit of alertness –of always following the ball—into Tech football teams. Friday, October 16th saw their efforts materialize when the Tech “Golden Eagle” journeyed over to Bowling Green, Ky., pounced upon the Ogden Cardinals when he was seemingly asleep and came home the victory 12 to 6. The game was played on a field ankle-deep in mud played on a field ankle-deep in mud and made anything but straight football out of the question. Determined to win and realizing that the team who cashed in on the breaks of the game would emerge the victor, Tech was not only waiting, watchful for anything that came her way, but by constant rushing of the punter, made a break, seized it, ran away with a touchdown and eventually the game. Tech kicked off to Ogden who was downed on their 25 yard line. On the very first play Ogden attempted to kick but the punt was blocked by Moss and Jobe grabbed the ball and was off for the first touchdown. Again Ogden received, and again were downed on their 25 yard line. Again they attempted to kick, but the kicker being greatly rushed and exceedingly nervous dropped the ball, whereupon, dapper Mr. Wilson pounced upon it as an eagle should and was away for touchdown number two and the last, but quite enough to come home the victor, for Ogden earned nothing () the remainder of the game. However, due to a slight misunderstanding as to when the game should end, after the last minute of play in the first quarter, Ogden bucked one over from Tech’s 3 yard line and therefore the Ogden six points. But if the old maxim that like produces like runs true to form another one known as old man. “Dope” received a rather rude jolt. In their first game of the season Ogden defeated Cumberland University 6 to 30, the next week G.P.I. defeated Tech 14 to 0; the next week Cumberland defeated G.P.I. defeated Tech 14 to 0; the next week Cumberland defeated G.P.I. 14 to 0; and the next week Tech defeated Ogden 12 to 6, all of which leads us to believe that on a dry field Tech would have beaten G.P.I. and thus removed what promises to be the only blemish on an other wise clean schedule. In the line Moss and Wilson were the outstanding stars, while Jobe played his usual great game in the backfield. The punting of Hughes was good enough to keep Ogden outside of scoring territory except in the last moments of the first quarter, when they advanced to our three yard line. The Tech line-up: Watson, L.E.; Brown, L.T.; Moss L. G.; Suggs, C.; Miller, R.G.; Wilson, R.T.; Cooper, R.E.; Hughes, Q.B.; Lewis, L.H.; Starnes, R.H.; Jobe, F.B. Ogden not available. SOME FACTS ABOUT MEMBERS OF ALUMNI ASSN. Total number of graduates from both Institute and High School, beginning with the first class of 1928, 313. Number of Institute graduates, 71 or 23%. Number of boys, 133 or 42%. Number of girls, 180 or 58%. (The following figures are only approximately since the address and occupation of all graduates are not available.) Number in school at present, 60 or 19%. Number teaching, 125 or 40%. Number married, 80 or 25%. Number dead, 4 or 1%. Number whose address in the same as when they graduated, 125 or 40%. COLLEGE STUDENTS FORM ORGANIZATION At noon Monday, October 19th, the students of the three College Classes met in the main auditorium and organized as a unit, electing officers for the college student body as follows: President Bryce D. Stone 1st V.-Pres. Hazel Wall 2nd V.-Pres. Harry Draper Sec’y.-Treas. Fred Terry This is a continuation of the organization which proved so effective last year in successfully executing a great many worthwhile movements for the betterment of Tech. prominent among the organization’s past accomplishments is the presentation of a Shakespearean Drama which was given as a part of the 1925 Commencement program. Plans are now being made to present another of Shakespeare’s plays, and every effort will be put forth to make it an even greater success than our previous performance. College spirit is emphasized and encouraged by the organization. We have the “pep,” a splendid staff of officers and plenty of room to work for we are starting just one to work for we are starting just one notch from the bottom, so lets cooperate in the efforts for improvement. Let every college student aim to do something beneficial for Tennessee Tech during the coming year. FOOTBALL SCHEDULE Oct. 23 –M.T.T.C. Here Oct. 30—Bethel Russellville. Nov. 6—Hiwassee Madisonville Nov. 13—Sewanee Freshmen Here Nov. 20—Cumberland Lebanon IMPROVEMENTS FOR OUR LIBRARY Old students and alumni who visit T.P.I. always express themselves as being highly pleased with the growth or the library. The library has been enlarged year by year until now it is a library of which any institution might well be proud. We now have a much larger reading room, more tables, a more convenient track with binders for periodicals, and a larger stacks room well filled with volumes that bear directly upon the courses offered at T.P.I. The president and the faculty are succeeding in their efforts to extend the library still further. Miss Ray, who last year was student librarian ahs been made regular librarian and is now in full charge of her department, Miss Ray is still doing the splendid work this year that she did last, and we are fortunate indeed to have her. Four hundred new books will be added to the three thousand that are already in the library. These books will deal chiefly with subjects related to English, Education, and English and American History. Next month one hundred regular library chairs will be placed in the reading room. With its many improvements, including the new card system which has been installed, our library is quite modern, and when the new library tables come next year it will compare favorably with the libraries of the largest institutions in the south. Every Tech student who has not already done so, should subscribe for The Oracle at once, and urge others to do so. It is your newspaper. TEACHERS ARE COMING FRIDAY A Good Game Expected. Tech Ready. On the afternoon of Friday, October 23rd, the Tech “Golden Eagles” will have as their opponents on the gridiron, the team from Middle Tennessee Teachers College (former M.T.N.) at Murfreesboro, Tennessee. The “Teachers” come in quest of revenge for a 6-0 defeated which was handed them last year when Tech’s warriors journeyed down to Murfreesboro. The Murfreesboro team is rated as stronger than that of last year and has been playing good football all season. A real struggle may be expected when the teams take the field next Friday. “EAGLES” EVEN OLD SCORE Beat “Heights” 54-0 Smarting under the defeat at the hands of Gallatin Private Institute a week before, the Tech “Golden Eagle,” on Friday October 9th, sunk his claws deep into the very marrow of the Castle Heights football team and tore it all to shreads. And thus was last year’s 20 to 0 defeat of Tech by Heights avenged and well done at that. The final count was 54 to 0 and would have been twice as much had the varsity team been used the entire game. The game had hardly started, however and Tech had scored her first touchdown when the reserves were sent in to show their ability. Only straight football was attempted, and that quite effectively. Runs by Jobe anywhere from fifteen to thirty yards were quite a common thing, and Dowell, Hughes, and Lewis likewise received their share. The game was such a runaway that instead of comparing the merits of the two teams we are compelled to substitute a comparison of our own squad. For the varsity, Jobe and Wilson had a slight edge over the others in individual playing, while the work of Dowell and Carr of the reserves looks very promising indeed. But after all has been said and done, the victory was an empty one at that, for Heights was only a shadow of her former self, and is () really not in Tech’s class. Her victory at Tech’s expense last year was mainly due to better physical condition and not to a better quality of playing material. For Heights, Captain Rochelle was all of the team, but as it takes eleven like him to make an efficient, smooth-running team, his efforts were useless. The line-up and summary: Tech Heights Watson L.E. Rice Brown L.T. Fletcher Moss L.G. Rochelle Clark C. Doval Miller R.G. Love Wilson R.T. Waldrum Cooper R.E. Rutledge Hughes Q.B. Sewall Starnes L.H. Barnette Lewis R.H. Morton Jobe F.B. Martin Score by quarters: 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q Final Tech 13 6 14 21 54 Heights 0 0 0 0 0 Scoring touchdowns: hughes, Jobe 3, Carr, Cooper, Starnes. Points after Touchdowns: Wilson 4, Hughes 2. Substitutions: For Tech; most of the reserves; for Heights: McGregor for Rice, Sewall for Powell. Official: Referee Hughes (Nashville); Umpire, Carlen; Head Linesman, Bryant. THE RESERVES DEFEAT CLAY COUNTY HIGH It has been said, somewhere, that when hard luck comes it comes all at once, and the opposite should also be true –at least it was for Tech the week-end of October 10. After helping the varsity lick. Castle Heights 54 to 0 on Friday, October 9th, the resevres went over to Celina the next day and proceeded to give the Clay County High School a good drubbing to the tune of 21 of 0. The reserve team, during the afternoon frolic, completed three passes for a distance of 100 yards, two of them resulting in touchdowns. Matheny scored two touchdowns and Minor one. On the defense Bassett and Keene were exceptionally strong, but it was the good work of the whole team which made possible the well-deserved victory. PICTURE SHOW On Saturday evening, October 17, the Y.M.C.A. presented the picture “Top of the World” in the auditorium of the main building. The picture was splendid and was attended by quite a few of the students and faculty. All who like movies should attend these shows, for the pictures shown are first class in every particular, the proceeded go to the Y.M. and Y.W.C.A. which organizations purchased the screen upon which the pictures are shown, and the price of admission is small, being 10 cents each for students. Don’t miss the next picture. SOPHOMORE PEP The meetings of the Sophomore College Class are very enthusiastic and full of pep. Each member seems willing to do their part in making their class the best in school. Mr. Darwin has withdrawn from the office of secretary and Miss Bracey has been elected in his place. Plans have been made for some kind of class entertainment, to be decided on later, and the president. Mr. Miller, urged that every member be present and make it a full-fledged Class affair that will be enjoyed by all. TECH GIRL’S SOCIETIES HAVE JOINT PROGRAM The P.L.S. and B.L.S. started something new when both Societies voted one hundred per cent for a joint program. Almost every member of both Societies were present Monday afternoon, October 19th, in the auditorium. The following interesting program was given, by talent from both Societies; Devotional Beulah Clark (B.L.S.) Vocal Solo Emily Stanton (P.L.S.) Reading Edith Gentry (B.L.S.) Vocal Solo Mary E. Rash (P.L.S.) Piano Solo Mary B. Davis (P.L.S.) Jokes Lucille Lee (B.L.S.) President McKeel of the Palladian Society and President Quarles of the Belle Lettres Society, each made an interesting address. A large number of visitors were present. The sentiments of several Society members were given and it is believed that a practice has been started which will prove beneficial, as well as distribute a feeling of good spirit and fellow among the student and Society members, heretofore unknown. THE ENROLLMENT Tech now has an enrollment of 207 students. Of these 111 are high school students, and 96, or 47%, are students of College grade. While the total enrollment is less than that of last year, this is not especially discouraging since Tech trains most of the teachers for the grammar and high schools in this section of Tennessee. We anticipate the return of many of these teachers for the winter and spring terms at Tech. The percentage of college students is increasingly annually. Watch us grow into a four-year College. ANNUAL HALLOWEEN PARTY TO BE GIVEN On the evening of October 31st, the P.L.S. and U.C.L.S. will entertain the entire student body and faculty members with their annual Halloween party. Committees have been appointed including Invitations, Decorations, Entertainment and Refreshments, and elaborate plans are being made. Owing to past records of Tech Halloween parties, a large crowd will be in attendance and the social is sure to be a success. THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute Printed by The Herald Publishing Co. Entered as Second Class matter at the Cookeville Postoffice, Cookeville, Tenn. EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief Bryce D. Stone ‘26 Assistant Editor Edward McKay ‘27 ASSOCIATE EDITORS Athletics M. Douglas Robbins ‘27 Wit and Humor David Dow ‘29 Exchange Elizabeth Ensor ‘28 Classes Martha Sedivak ‘27 Society Shelia Officer ‘29 Alumni Hazel Wall ‘27 Faculty Advisor Thos. L. Passon BUSINESS Business Manager Lee S. Darwin ‘27 Assistant Bus. Mgr. J. Fred Terry ‘27 CIRCULATION Circulation Manager Otto Masters ‘28 Asst. Circ. Manager Nola Quarles ‘27 Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY NEW ATHLETIC FIELD Our new Athletic Field is daily becoming more a reality and less a cherished dream. It is an addition to our school plant and will fulfil a long felt need. For several years we have been losing money at baseball and football games because we have had no adequate playing field. We may now expect our Athletic Association to be more prosperous in the future. The field will be ready for use during the next baseball season. TO WHOM PRAISE IS DUE To girls of the Y.W.C.A. are proving themselves about the peppiest crowd on the campus this year. They are holding regular services every morning, have taken two hikes into the country and are planning others, and are selling sandwiches and confections on the campus and at ball games. It takes real pluck for girls to brave wintry weather, such as we have had at ball games this year, in an attempt to better an organization. Let’s patronize them, fellows –they deserve it. THE NEWS REEL We appreciate the courtesy of the Strand Theatre management which permits us to enjoy the regular Pathe News Reel occasionally at Chapel hour. This picturization of the world’s current events is a worthwhile innovation to our daily routine and is enjoyed by all. “Why do they call the dental office a parlor?” “That’s just another name for drawing room.” “KEEPING FIT” By Ruth Van Hooser What is health? Health is that quality of life that renders the individual fit to “love most and serve best.” Health results from living in the proper way. It flows from life as a by-product of actions, responses or conditions that are wholesome. But in order for you to secure and maintain health you must know more than the mere meaning of the word. You must know the laws governing and the conditions influencing good health. Now, these leading conditions essential to health may be thus enumerated, discussing each in turn. 1st. A constant supply of pure air. Everyone knows that we must constantly be supplied with air –pure air, for if it be loaded with mixtures or it’s proportions deranged it cannot be breathed without producing injurious results. Various conditions such as improper temperature, improper humidity and lack of air movement tends to surround us with contaminated air must accordingly be guarded against. It is probably in bedrooms, theatres, churches, and schools that the most harm is done. 2nd. A sufficiency of nourishing food rightly taken. You should become acquainted with the process of nutrition in order to understand how to eat, what to eat, when to eat, and how to conduct yourself after eating. Mastication of food is thoroughly inductive to health, while fast eating is injurious and even dangerous. Farinaceous foods of all kinds are highly suitable to the human constitution, while beverages increase the wasting of the natural strength and their use is unwise. Water has a very important place in the diet, the individual requiring six to eight glasses per day. A variation in food is both useful and important. With regard to the number and time of meals nothing can be said with authority, but breakfast, dinner, and tea as a light meal may be considered as a safe if not very accurate prescription for the daily food of a health person. A short period of repose should be allowed before and after each meal and no exercise, either mental or bodily, should be taken directly after eating. 3rd. Cleanliness To keep the body in a cleanly condition is important, and the bath is the most important of all things as an aid to securing both cleanliness and beauty. The mind should likewise be kept clean, for an unclean mind retards growth in that id does not function as it should and lowers the vitality of the individual. The preservation of the teeth is also an important factor. 4th. A sufficiency of exercise to the various organs. The amount of bodily exercise taken should be adapted to age, sex, occupation, climate and the individual himself. The body must be in a state of sufficient health to endure the exertion, and the exercise must never be carried beyond what the parts are capable of bearing with ease. In activity there is an increase in the force and rate of the heart, the respirations are increased in depth and frequency, perspiration becomes more and more marked and more waste is eliminated. The brain should also be exercised for by disuse it will fall out of it’s proper state and create misery to its possessor, however, by over exertion the functions of the brain are liable to be deranged and destroyed without a due share of exercise to the whole of the mental faculties, there can be no soundness in any. 5th. A right body temperature. Theat degree of heat which the body finds agreeable when in a state of inactivity is sixty degrees Fahrenheit, and this temperature should never vary; and it cannot without producing injury. Proper clothing should be worn at all times and that worn in proportion to the temperature of the climate and the season of the year. Wet clothing should never be applied to any part of the body as it tends to reduce the temperature. At all periods of life it is desirable to avoid exposure to low temperatures. 6th. A sufficiency of cheerful and innocent enjoyment and exemption from harassing cares, for –“All work and no play will make you a dull person.” Now summing up we have— 1st a constant supply of pure air. 2nd a sufficiency of nourishing food rightly taken. 3rd cleanliness. 4th a sufficiency of exercise rightly taken. 5th a right body temperature. 6th a sufficiency of cheerful and innocent enjoyment and exemption from harassing cares. You abide by these suggestions follow these instructions and maintain your health. Keep fit. Y.W.C.A. NOTES This year the Y.W.C.A. is a live, enthusiastic organization inspired by the many splendid new ideas gained at the Blue Ridge Conference last summer. The leaders are conducting the work in such a way as to make the strongest appeal possible to the vital interest of the members. A new conception of the meaning of the Y.W. organizations is being have been suspended by “discussion groups,” which gives an opportunity for intimate, comradely discussion of vital problems. FUN Wilson –Go to town Jimmie and get me an Arrow collar. Miller –How narrow? “Merrill,” said Dannie Wright, “will you love me when I grow old and ugly?” “Dearest,” he replied, “you may grow old, but you will never grow uglier.” “She was a fine girl, B.C.” “B.C.?” “Yes, Before College.” Mr. McClannahan –Stop arguing. You are as bad as the man who argued all day as to whether his grandfather was 97 or 98 when he died. Fred Terry –How old was he? Frosh –Ever home sick? Soph –Yes, that’s why I left. “Waiter,” said Winningham, “have you any shelled corn?” Waiter (Surprised) –“Yessir.” Winningham –“Well take this egg out and feed it.” R.E. Smith –The bath over at our hall hasn’t been working for a month. Moss –When did you find out? R.E.S. –This morning. She is only a farmer’s daughter, but she sure does know her oats. Elsie –What is your idea of a smart girl? L. Puckett –One that can make her complexion taste as good as it looks. Dean Smith –A burglar broke into my house last night. Mr. Kittrell –What did he get? D.S. –Practice! He –You look like Helen Brown. She –Thank you! I even look worse in white. Wilson –Boys, I just heard from my girl. Brown –Where’s she cooking now? Denny –What are you going to give your girl for Christmas? Luke – Nothing. Denny –Engagement broke? Luke –No—I am. “Ditty” Bruce –Are you the man who cut my hair last? Barber –No, I’ve only been here a year. McKay –What shall it profit a man that he earn ten bucks and yet lose his own soul? Jobe –Ten bucks. Frank Small (With changing voice) –(Fine) Let me in (Course) Let me in. Elise –Come in both of you. Amy S. –Oh, Aubrey, I’m so glad you’ve come back. I heard some silly man had toppled over the cliffs –and I was afraid it might be you! My bonnie was fond of jazz dancing had a partner –weight five hundred three. The floor was too slick and too slippery— O bring back my bonnie to me! JUST IMAGINE Brownie without a chew of “Star Navy.” James Miller with hair all wavy. Nola Quarles being a “gink.” Jellie Watson without a “kink.” Jack Morrison with a date. Mr. Passons being late. The Dean without “Teaberry.” A “special” not addressed to Fred Terry, The East Hall without a Wa-o-w! Robley Jobe not having a “row.” Mr. Barnes with a smile. Simon Suggs walking a mile. C.W. Davis teaching aesthetic dancing. Louise Woods without incessant prancing. Jesse Clarke in a “mad fury.” Lee Darwin in abject penury. Merrill without Danny Wright, Elizabeth Hargis doing something right. CUPID’S VICTIMS In the wake of an epidemic of marriage “it is” which struck Cookeville during the past summer, the ranks of the Tech “hobnobbing” society are sadly depleted. Many of the old familiar “pairs” recently trod the road to the domicile of the Justice of the Peace, via the County Clerk’s office, incidentally exploding the theory that the college “flame” of romance does not last. Four of the five couples, who are now so blissfully wedded, who are now so blissfully wedded, did their Romeo and Juliet-“ing” while in school at Tech. the victims of Cupid’s darts are: Ruby Barksdale and Hunter Hill, Lola Massa and Emmett Smartt, Wilsie McGee and James Bockman, Pearl Sadler and Lewis Loftis, Delia Gentry and Odessa Johnson. Adieu, enchanted ones. You have crossed the bar into those ethereal realms where each shall hold the key to his own and another’s happiness. We, who are left behind, salute thee, and solemnly resolve to cause Dean Smith to do Nick Carter’s daily dozen at least once each day and to require his strict attention to his duties as a sleuth, at the same time upholding our historic traditions as hobnobber of the first order. WHAT THE FRESHMAN ENGLISH CLASS IS DOING The members of the Freshman English class have been providing quite a bit of entertainment as well as improving their oratorical powers. The class is studying the foundations of speech-making. This course embodies a great deal of practical experience, since each student delivers two speeches before the class. The art of speech making is something that is sadly lacking to the average individual. The first year English course is doing much toward remedying these defects. While the freshies may not become as silvery tongued as Demosthenes, they are at least learning to express their thoughts and ideas better. The student body has had the treat of hearing some of the freshmen deliver their speeches. Four of the best orators were selected by the class and their speeches formed a very interesting part of the Chapel program. Those speaking were: Ruth Van Hooser—“How to Keep Fit.” Leslie Myers—“The important of Good Roads to the Farmer.” Amy Shipley –”Planning, Meals for Economy and Nutrition.” Charles Davis –“Effective Ways of Advertising a Certain Class of Good.” We are printing Miss Van Hooser’s speech in this issue of the Oracle.

1925 October 22

 THE TECH ORACLE THE 1924 BASKETBALL SQUAD Cart Puckett, Jobe, Blount, Poteet, Watson, Clark (Captain), Winningham, Alcorn, Coach Overall. GOLDEN EAGLES CLOSE THE SEASON ON ROAD On Wednesday, Feb. 25, the Tech basketeers encountered the Presbyterian Preachers of Clarksville and were defeated 39-21. Newton with 18 points was easily the star of the contest, having garnered 7 field goals and 4 free shots. Alexander was second with 14 points. Lineups: Tech Pos. S.P.U. Poteet F Newton (18) Blount (6) F Perrine Jobe (8) C Alexander (14) Winningham (2) G Wilson (1) Alcorn G Gardner (2) Substitutes: Tech—Clark (4) for Poteet; Poteet for Jobe; Jobe for Blount; Watson (3) for Winningham; Winningham for Jobe. S.P.U. –Davis (1) for Perrine; Lindsey for Alexander; Hall (3) for Newton. WIN FAST GAME? On Thursday night, Feb. 26, the Tech boys met and defeated Ogden College on the latter’s floor. The game was fast and clean throughout, with Tech holding the lead from start to finish. The entire Tech team played well, with () Alcorn especially guarding in excellent style. D. Smith played best for Ogden. Lineups: Tech Pos. Ogden Clark (4) F Swift Blount (8) F D. Smith (8) Jobe (7) C Brown (4) Winningham (4) G J. Smith Alcorn G Pickles (1) Substitutions: Tech – Watson (1) for Winningham. Ogden –Hartford for Brown; McGinley for Swift; Brown for McGinley. NEWS FROM THE DIAMOND Large Squad Reports for Baseball Practice On Monday, March 9, Coach Overall sounded a call for diamond toilers. About thirty stalwart young men answered the call and were given their task at showing their wares from their respective positions. From this group of huskies there should be molded a good college team. Those who aspire to twirl the horsehide are, Sidwell, LeFevre, Denny, Lee, and Puckett. The receiving will be cared for by Winningham and Hughes. First base will be guarded by Bryant and C LeFevre. Second base must go to Blount, Clark or Johnson. Watson is unopposed for shortstop, and Clark will probably be shifted to third () base. The candidates for outfield positions are, D. Puckett, L. Puckett, Shipley, Jobe, Ross, Gill and Leonard. From present indications the starting lineup will be –catcher, Winningham; first base, Bryant; second base, Blount; shortstop, Watson; third base, Clark; outfielders, Shipley, D. Puckett, L. Puckett or Jobe. With the good offensive and defensive work that this team is able to produce Tech should have its greatest year in diamond history. BASEBALL SCHEDULE Date Team Place March 27 Baxter Cookeville April 2-3 Castle Heights Lebanon April 10-11 M.T.N. Cookeville April 16 Bethel Russellville April 17-18 S.P.U. Clarksville April 20-21 S.P.U. Cookeville April 29-30 M.T.N. Murfreesboro May 1-2, Cumberland Lebanon May 5 Maryville Cookeville May 8-9 Cumberland Cookeville May 15 Livingston Livingston May 22 Open Cookeville COLLEGE TO PRESENT DRAMA “As You Like It” To Be Given By College Classes One of the most commendable actions taken by the college department of T.P.I. within recent years is the decision to present a Shakespearean play during commencement. The idea originated in the Senior class and was presented to the other college classes. The plan is also being encouraged by the members of the faculty. The present Senior class is not large enough to prevent the play, but it is hoped that in future years his class will be large enough to support this plan. We hope that it will be an annual affair. The committee which was appointed by the presidents of the three classes, after considering several plays and with the advice of the faculty, presented the play “As You Like It” as one of the best fitted for presentation this year. The action of the committee was approved by a vote of the body. Further plans are being made and work will begin on the play immediately. TENNIS CLUB The students interested in tennis met and organized a tennis club under the direction of Miss Jobe. The following officers were elected: E. B. Hudgens, president; Wendell Johnston, secretary and treasurer. A day was set to clean off the court and there has been some new material ordered. The tennis club is planning on having a tournament at the end of school, which we hope will create a good deal of interest in this sport. We urge that every student interested in tennis become a member of the club. Y.M.C.A. NIMINEES ELECTION SOON At a recent business meeting of the Young Men’s Christian Association nominations for the next year’s leaders of the association were made as follows: For president –C.W. Davis, Lee S. Darwin, Harry Chitwood For Secretary –Robert Rose, Paul Tidwell. The election will be held at the next regular meeting of the organization. A request for assistance in raising funds for the donation of emblems to varsity players on Tech’s athletic teams was brought before the meeting by the president of the Tech letter club. This movement was approved by a vote of the association members and plans were made to donate the net proceeds of the next picture shown by the “Y” to the T club. LOSE IN EXTRA PERIOD On Friday night, Feb. 27, Tech was defeated by Bethel College on the latter’s floor by a score of 23-20. Tech held the lead almost the entire regular period, but were tied at 20-20 in the last seconds, and were defeated in the extra playing period. Lineups: Tech Pos. Bethel Clark (2) F. Taylor (7) Blount (6) F Higgins (2) Jobe (3) C Newman (4) Watson G Barnes (4) Alcorn G Wallace (1) Substitutions: Tech –Poteet (2) for Clark; Winningham (7) for Watson. Bethel –Reynolds (5) for Taylor. BELLES LETTRES The Belles Lettres Literary Society held its regular business meeting March 2. The following officers were elected: President – Myrtle Bullock. Vice-president –Mary Tom Johnson. Secretary –Gladys Bohannon Chaplain –Anna Roberts Sergeant-at-Arms –Treva Cooper. Critic –Daisy Leonard. Reporter –Clyde Jackson. Program Committee –Flora Montgomery, Ruth Quarles, Arnie Parham. After the business we adjourned to meet again after the holidays. The Belles Lettres Literary Society met March 16th, and the following program was given: Song –“Wearing of the Green,” Society “Origin of St. Patrick’s Day,” Gladys Bohannon. Reading, Alberta Cassety. Irish Jokes, Lucile Lee. Irish Stunts, Jewel Lee, Bulah Milligan. We were delighted to have a new member added to our society. We were also glad to have a number back. Though they entered too late to take part in some of the contests, the cooperation which they will give the contestants will help determine whether the Eagle will hold in the Rose and Gray or the Black and gold in 1926. PALLADIAN LITERARY SOCIETY The Palladian Literary Society held its first meeting for the spring term Monday, March 16. The following new officers were elected: President –Rose Dow. Vice-President –Mildred mcDearman. Secretary –Jonny Bilbrey. Treasurer –Willard Johnson. Critic –Gorda Carrington. The officers who had served during the winter term are to be commended for their good work and the president, Miss Catherine. Hargis, especially, is to be praised for her earnest efforts and for her excellent leadership. One new member, Miss Elizabeth foster, was taken into the society and several old members who have just entered school were present. As it is just a short time until the close of school and until time for the reading contests, debates, etc., the society as a whole and each member are determined to do all they can to come out victorious and thus hold the banner that was won last year. SHERWOODS ELECT OFFICERS The Sherwood Literary Society met in its regular meeting room on Monday afternoon, March 16, for the purpose of electing officers for the spring term, president Cantrell presided, and the following officers were elected: President –C.B. Johnson. Vice-President –Turner Evans. Secretary –J.P. Buck. Treasurer –Alva Starnes. Chaplain –C.W. Davis Critic –Herman Langford. Attorney-General –Lester King. Sergeant-at-Arms –Houston Haile The Sherwoods have just finished an excellent term’s work, and are concentrating their efforts to win in the inter-society contests during the spring term. GRRRRRR! The great Missouri halfback was a special guest of honor at the enemy training table before the big game. “How would you like your meat, sir?” queried the waiter of one of the enemy. “Raw,” rumbled the giant guard. “And you sir?” asked the waiter of another of the enemy. “Red, raw meat,” bellowed the huge tackle. “How about you sir?” said the waiter to the man on our hero’s left. “Bloody, red, raw meat,” roared the third and scowled at the guest of honor. There was silence as the waiter put the question to the great Missouri “back.” “Aw, hell,” he thundered, “drive in your cow and I’ll cut of my own slice.” –Missouri Outlaw. “A desire for knowledge is the natural feeling of mankind; and every human being whose mind is not debauched, will be willing to give all that he has to get knowledge.” –Johnson. Beware how you criticize. If you are the tallest person in the crowd, do not scold others before they cannot see all that you see. THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Printed by Herald Publishing Co. Entered as Second Class matter at the Cookeville Post Office. STAFF: Bryce D. Stone ’26 Editor-in-Chief Shelia Officer ’29 Social Amy Shipley ’28 Class Hallie Ray ’25 Faculty Hendon Johnston ’26 Athlete Thos. L. Passons English Alex Shipley Poet Edwin McKay Exchange Rose Dow Alumni Business Department: James D. Miller ’27 Business Manager Jack Morrison ’26 Assistant Lee S. Darwin Circulation Manager Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY Into your life and mine there must come periods of darkness. We must face business and personal reverses. We must struggle through the miasma of misunderstanding and doubt. We must cross swords with the hundred and one petty evils that beset our ways and would pull us back. And yet –and yet “there is no failure except in no longer trying. There is no defeat except from within – no really insurmountable barrier save our own inherent weakness of purpose.” Keep on! --Exchange BRITISHERS COMMENT Before their recent departure for Hawaii, the Oxford debate Team was asked by the Stanford University Daily Palo Alto for their opinion of the American college life. Concerning fraternities the three Englishmen voiced unanimous disapproval. J.D. Woodruff, leader of the Oxford team, echoed the opinion of William Robson, of the London School of Economics, whose much discussed article on American colleges appeared in The New Student, December 20. “The college fraternities seem to exist to force their members into a mould,” said Woodruff. “The pressure on the individual is tremendous. Every tangent and every angle that would make him stand out as an individual is removed. One fraternity man told me that they took in only the boys who gave promise of doing something big. That, to me, seems appalling. It implies a scramble for a certain sort of success that crowds out some of the finest value of the living.” Contrasting the American plan of university with the English, Mr. Woodruff said: “There is a genial tolerance at Oxford for students who would rather talk than work. American colleges over over-organized and students are too earnest for high scholarship. It is a great mistake to do everything too well. There are many things that, although they are worth doing, are not worth doing well. “Few persons have a taste for scholarship, which is of no more importance in itself than a taste for doughnuts or cabbage. It is a mistake for a college to try to force education on a student.” Malcolm McDonald, the third member of the team, found more to his liking in American universities than either of the other visitors. He said he sympathized with the earnestness of American college men. –The New Student HOW TO HANDLE A WOMAN ELECTRICALLY When a woman is bored –Exciter. If she gets to excited –Controller. If she won’t come when you want her –Coaxer. If she is willing to come half way –Meter. If she is willing to come all the way – Receiver. If she is an angel –Transformer. If she is a devil –Converter. If she tries to cross you –Detecter. If she proves that your fears are wrong –Compensator. If your fears are right –Arrester. If she goes to pieces –Coherer. If she goes up in the air –condenser. If she is hungry –Feeder. If she is a nice girl –Shocker. If you have one just like her –Alternator. If she is too faster –Reducer. If she fumes and sputters –Insulator. If she becomes upset –Reverser. And when you get tired of her –Electrocute her. –Exchange. HINTS FOR HOUSEWIVES The big toe makes an excellent stopper for the bathtub. Holeproof hosiery, when properly worn, makes an excellent container for hubby’s pay envelope. If the gas goes off, don’t curse the gas company. Put another quarter in the meter. Don’t throw coffee grounds out. Dry them in the oven and give them to friend husband as grapenuts. –Exchange. NEW AND OLD FRIENDS The Babbler, David Lipscomb College, Nashville, Tenn. The Central Star, Dickson High School, Dickson, Tenn. The Cardinal, Ogden College, Bowling Green, Ky. The Trident, Milligan College, Johnson City, Tenn. The Normalite, M.T.N., Murfreesboro, Tenn. The Bethel Collegian, Bethel College, Russellville, Ky. The Purple and Gold, C.H.S., Clarksville, Tenn. The Soulwester, S.P.U., Clarksville, Tenn. The Booster, Shop Springs, Tenn. The Bayonet, Tennessee Military Institute, Sweetwater, Tenn. The bugle Call, C.M.A., Columbia, Tenn. The Babbler –Your paper compared favorably with any college journal. Don’t you think it would look more attractice in magazine form? The Essay on Boys and Essay on girls was clever and original. The Bugle Call –A new exchange. We like your spirit. You have alive exchange editor. Ask him what he thinks of us. The Normalite –Another new friend. Your paper seems well arranged. Why not try a few more jokes and get your exchange editor busy? The Central Star—we are glad to welcome your paper. We like the neat form and clever jokes. Your debaters are certainly showing up well. The Booster –Your magazine has not so much material, but it lacks nothing in appearance and arrangement. Send us the Booster regularly. Bethel Collegian –We are waiting for your next issue. Don’t fail to remember us. Congratulations for the fine record your basketball team has made. The Purple and Gold –Your journal is always good. You must have an excellent staff. Your Dumb Dora Department is something new. Give me regards to “Miserable” Meacham and “Dejected” Bowen. A dairy maid milked the pensive goat, And, pouting paused to mutter “I wish, you brute, you’d turn to milk.” And the animal turned to butt her. --Exchange. PATRONIZE ORACLE ADVERTISERS “Aspiration sees only one side of every question; possession, many.” –Lowell. RELIGIOUS AND EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS On Wednesday evening, March 11, the Y.M.C.A. held its regular meeting. Alton Adams was the principal speaker and Herman Langford conducted the devotional Mr. Adams also gave several appropriate poetic selections in a very able manner. A variation was made in the program for March 18. Two reels of industrial films were furnished by the industrial department of the National Y.M.C.A., and gave some splendid views of the historic Mohawk valley in New York. The second reel showed some of the improvements made by medical science during the great war. ARTISTS GIVE CONCERT Mrs. Malone, soprano soloist; Mrs. Hoffman, pianist; Mr. Kenneth Rose, violinist; appeared in a concert Tuesday evening, March 10, at the City School Auditorium. These artists gave an animated, spirited performance. Such a trio is rarely assembled for participation in one work. Mrs. Malone, without doubt the best soprano in Nashville, displayed a voice of unsurpassable sweetness and warm tone. She explained briefly several of her numbers before their presentation, which added greatly to the interest of the music. She was recalled for encored between each group by her enthusiastic listeners. Mrs. Offman, an exceptionally gifted pianist, revealed her artistic capabilities in her part of the program. The audience gave evidence of sincere pleasure in the music offered by Mr. Rose, teachers of violin in Ward-Belmont. The Duo-Art was an unusual and interesting feature of the well planned program. A good sized audience took keen delight in this splendid recital. T CLUB MINSTREL The minstrel given by the T Club under the direction of Miss Jobe was well attended. This was the first entertainment of its kind given this season. The jokes were new, and the music snappy. Those having a special part in the minstrel were, Jeff Reagan, Clifford Massa, Dale Lee, Luther Puckett, Lauren O’Dell, Benton Cantrell, Jimmy Miller, Harold Blount, Gradis Winningham, Dewitt Puckett and Merrill Hughes Mr. O’Dell gave several clarinet solos which were very enjoyabl.e vocal solos and quartets added to the program. Mr. Cantrell was master of ceremonies. Miss Effie Judd was accompanist. The Joyland Six furnished a musical program before the performance. Recent chapel visitors were Mrs. W.A. Howard and Mrs. J.H. Carlen. A very enjoyable musical program was given by Mrs. Howard and Mrs. Carlen. Mrs. Howard played “Valse Brilliante” and the “Handerschiel Dance” Her short story of the latter, made it much more interesting. Mrs. Carlen sang, by request, “Thank God for a Garden,” “Memory,” and as an encore gave “Love Sends a Little Gift of Roses.” Mrs. Howard and Mrs. Carlen are always welcome visitors. They never fail to bring something worthwhile to the student body. Announcements were made regarding the concert given recently under the auspices of the Cookeville Music Club. JOKES Robert Smith (reading): “Say, W.Q., what’s the meaning of lethargy?” W.Q. (working trigonometry) “I can’t give a definition, but Alex Shipley seems to be a good example.” C.W. Davis (to S.H. Bracy) “Say, big boy, be careful whose pencil you use in touching that petrified finger.” Wheeler Allen in the library (after smoking his first cigar) “Well, b’gosh, first time I knew that Hallie ran a circulating library.” Frances H. (in Loftis’ store) “My sucker is broke.” Fred Shipley (to himself): “I wonder how she found it out.” A permanent guest “I have a new baby brother.” “Is he going to stay?” “I think so; he’s got all his things off.” Poet’s Corner COLLEGE ALGEBRA Swear your heart out, ruin your eyes. All the problems seem like lies. Bone all night; not quite alive. A “quiz” next day, just forty-five. Lose religion, then your soul; Cuss quadratics for a “Ghoul,” Hurl your book beyond your sight, Darn the stuff, I’m thru tonight. --Alex Shipley. ON THE CAMPUS On the campus comes the thrill, From the swamp is heard the trill Of the lazy frogs, quite gay; Making music all the day. From the diamond comes the crash Of horsehide meeting ash; Then a vaulter twists a knee, Clearing only eight feet-three. All C.E.’s are now at work, Khaki trousers and woolen shirt; Sight and measure all day long, In their math, they must be strong. On the courts lawn tennis reigns. Fast are volleys down the lanes; Lovers meet to watch the play, Do they see it? None can say. From East Hall there comes the tone Of a wailing Saxophone: Then a cornet drowns it all; Scenes of campus life enthrall. --Alex Shipley Keith: “C.W. Davis burnt a hole in his pants.” Jackson: “did he have insurance?” Keith: “No, this coat tail covered the loss.” Satisfaction Guaranteed “Are you sure,” questioned the old lady, “that this century plant will bloom in a hundred years?” “Positively, Madam, positively,” answered Buff, the florist. “If it doesn’t bring it back.”

1925 March 20

 THE TECH ORACLE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT, MARCH 4, 5, 6 “SUPER-LIBRARY” PLANNED FOR YALE New Project Brings Memories of Eventful History of Old Yale College Library “—And Now,” as the advertisers say, “the Super-Library,” No less than 192 feet high and 85 feet square, the “book tower” is to rest within two years on the campus of Yale, costing $6,000,000, housing eventually 5,000,000 volumes, admitting two thousand readers at a time: the Sterling Memorial Library, “the largest and best-planned in the world.” Before the huge central pile, the freshman as he approaches will soon notice the smaller Memorial Hall Entrance; and entering this he finds himself in the nave of a cathedral lighted by sunrays through the stained-glass windows on a tessellated pavement; passing through and turning to the right, he is in a cloister court with a fountain and trees; above him and the massive buttresses. In a moment he disappears into the fortress or erudition protected by the Gothic style, the massive stone, the marvelous efficiency of the appointments against the distractions of the every-day human world while he glides through the mysterious shrine of Privileged Learning –The New Student. SOCIETIES TO PRESENT “AMAZON ISLE” MARCH 6 The principal incidents of the play follow. A masquerade ball is in session at the home of Cyrus B. Quackenbush (Earl Suggs), self made millionaire. It is given in honor of his oldest daughter Violet (Sheila Officer), Squire Sykes (Charles Davis) and his niece Pansy (Mary Crenshaw), arrive from Onion Center, Squire has a map of Tom Tom Island and he and Cyrus are going in partnership to hunt for a treasure buried there. The map is a stolen one. It belongs to Jack Davis (Douglas Robbins), who is in love with Rose (Elizabeth Crenshaw), Cyrus’s younger daughter, Cyrus is much opposed to Jack and has his secretary, Simpson (Robert Smith), send for a butler to throw Dawes out of the house. George (Sewell Brown), the colored butler and black faced comedian, butler and black-faced comedian gets the wrong idea and throws Cyrus out of his own house. The entire party go to Tom Tom Island. They are captured by the Amazon head hunters, a band of wild women. The Queen, Lula Palaza (Rebecca Johnston), has made George the general of her army; he having come to the island with Jack Dawes, but Dawes was () drowned. He pleads for their lives and freedom for a few more days and they all continue to hunt for the treasure. Peggy Rexcford (Robley Jobe), the social idler, has fallen deeply in love with Pansy, by chance they find the treasure. POPULARITY CONTEST CLOSES Final Ballots Cast on February 13 Much interest and enthusiasm has been manifested by Tech students during the balloting for the popularity contest which has been conducted by the Annual staff. The contest ended Saturday, Feb. 13. After having held the attention of the student body for two weeks. The winners are to be given places in the feature section of the Annual. It is hardly possible for us to mention everyone who receive votes for in some instance the votes were very widely distributed. We shall print the names of those who received the first and second highest number of votes, together with the number of votes each received. Prettiest Girl in High School Mary Ellen Rash 25,900 Lucille Cameron 5,700 Prettiest Girl in College Mary Elizabeth Ensor 23,200 Juanita Montgomery 8,300 Most Popular Girl Lucile Lee 18,400 Amy Shipley 12,600 Most Popular Boy James Miller 37,100 Lee S. Darwin 5,100 Best All-Round Boy Jesse Clark 24,500 Eddie Watson 21,100 DANTE’S “INFERNO” TO BE SHOWN HERE Saturday, February 27, Is The Date The moving picture to be shown next Friday night is a stupendous production based on the great Italian poem “The Divine Comedy” by Dante Modern film artists have left nothing undone to make this () great picture an adequate representation of that marvelous literary masterpiece. In the picture, as in the poem, we follow the travels of a person, in company with an angel, through the gruesome paths and by ways of Hades, where each unfortunate seems to have his own cell of torture and a private devil to administer the eternal punishment at opportune moments. The picture gives a splendid idea of the medieval and perhaps the modern conception of Hell. Few, if any, of us will ever take the occasion to read the poem, but we can all see the picture. It is worth your time. “EAGLES” HAVE SUCCESSFUL TRIP Win From Bethel, and Bowling Green Business University The Tech varsity basket ball team has just returned from a very successful trip to Kentucky, winning two out of three games played. Bethel was the first to fall before our attack, the score being 26 to 21. Moss and Jobe starred for Tech, and two of them scoring 25 points of the total number of points. Gish and Bush were outstanding for Bethel. Tech Line-Up Bethel Jobe (12) R.F. (9) Gish Lewis L.F. (4) Reynolds Moss (13) C. (5) Bush R. Robbins R.G. (3) Higgins Davis L.G. Baker Substitutes: Tech Denny for davis: Carr for Robbins Bethel Rogers for Higgins; Haynes for Baker. On Friday night we fell before the onslaught of the strong Ogden quint. The score was 49 to 27. Ogden had previously beaten all comers including Centre College. However, the bunch thinks they can avenge themselves next weekend when Ogden comes down for a return game. Smith, Ogden’s right forward, scored 27 points during the affair. Tech Line-Up Ogden Lewis (7) R.F. (4) Rice Jobe (8) L.F. (27) Smith Moss (7) C. (12) Hartford Davis L.G. Pickles Substitutions: Tech: M. Robbins (5) for Lewis; Denny for R. Robbins; Carr for Denny. Ogden Sledge (6) for Smith: McGinley for Hartford: Davis for Lawton. Referee: Temple. On Saturday night, contrary to () expectations, Tech downed Bowling Green Business University, who had beaten us on the local gym a few weeks before. The game was fast, cleanly played, and hotly contested. Two seconds before the game ended the score was 27 to 26 in B.G.B.U.’s favor. But just as the pistol fired M.L., Robbins attempted a long shot which went good, and was properly ruled legal by the referee. Jobe was high scorer for Tech, while Everett was most successful in ringing the basket for B.G.B.U. Tech Line-Up B.G.B.U. Lewis (2) R.F. (4) Denny Jobe (13) L.F. (4) Perisho Moss (7) C. (1) Gadd Denny (2) R.G. (13) Everett Davis L.G. (2) Clayton Substitutions: B.G.B.U.: Pitman (2) for Denny; Davis for Pitman. Tech: Carr (2) for Denny; Denny for Davis; R. Robbins for Lewis; M. Robbins (2) for Carr. THIRTEEN SCHOOLS HAVE ENTERED TEAMS Mr. J.T. Martin, of Castle Heights, Will Officials On Thursday afternoon, March 4, at 2 p.m., Tech’s third basket ball tournament will begin in full sway. Among the teams who have already sent in their application blanks properly drawn up are: Shop Springs High, the High School team of Burritt College at Spencer, Crossville High, Livingston Academy, Alpine High, White County High, Baxter Seminary, Jackson County Central High, Algood High, Monterey High, Crawford High, and Watertown High. The teams who have requested application blanks, but who have not returned them are: Lebanon High, Smith County High, Liberty High, Smithville High and Gladeville High, the winners of last year’s tournament. The Tech Preps will also enter. These teams are the pick of the Upper Cumberland section and should present the lovers of basket ball with quite an array of fast, hotly-contested games. Mr. J.T. Martin, formerly of the University of Oklahoma, and now an instructor in the Castle Heights Military Academy will officiate. The following are the rules which are to govern the tournament: 1. Each player must have been in school at least six weeks continuously, prior to March 5, 1926. 2. Each player must not be over 21 years of age. 3. Each player must be passing at least three units of standard high school work. 4. No player is eligible who has finished four years of high school work. 5. No player is eligible who played over three years of basket ball. 6. All team must be in the charge of the Coach or some member of the faculty: said member in charge to be responsible to the housing committee for the conduct of its members at all hours. 7. The tournament committee has the authority to disqualify any member of any team on any of the above reasons: also to disqualify any team or any member of any team for any misconduct on the part of any member of that team. 8. Entrance fee of $3.00 is enclosed. 9. All entrance blanks must be received by February 25th. CO-EDS LOSE TWO ON TRIP On a trip to East Tennessee last week the Tech Co-Eds lost to both Carson-Newman and Maryville by rather one-sided scores –to Carson-Newman 39 to 20 –to Maryville () 39 to 21. The Tech victory makes eleven straight for Carson-Newman. Their passing and floor-work was exceptionally good. The only consolation we get out of the game is the fact that we ran up a higher score than any other team they have encountered this season. In the Maryville game, Miss Shipley was high scorer for Tech with 15 points. For Maryville, Miss Belk was high scorer with 17 points. HISTORY OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION The Alumni Association was first organized on June 6, 1921, with T.W. Kittrell as President. Since that time the following men have been president: Cleburne Hatfield and Henry Barger, T.W. Kittrell having been elected for the third time in 1925. The growth in membership of the Association has been rapid. The first class graduated in 1918 and numbered twenty-two. The number of students receiving diplomas at the close of summer school has tripled during the three years that diplomas have been given at that time of the year. The growth of the graduating classes is shown by the following: Class of 1918 Institute graduates 10 Technical High School 7 County High School 5 Total 22 Three members of the high school class later graduated from the institute. Class of 1919 Institute Graduates 6 Technical High School 6 County High School 11 Total 23 Class of 1920 Institute Graduates 6 Technical High School 6 County High School 23 Total 41 Four members of the high school graduated later from the institute. Class 1921 Institute graduates 7 Technical High School 16 County High School 24 Total 47 One member of the college class later completed the three-year college course. Five members of the high school class graduated from the Institute, one of the five completing the three-year course. Class of 1922 Institute Graduates 12 Technical High School 27 County High School 16 Total 55 One member of the college class later completed the three-year course here. Ten members of the high school class graduated from the Institute, four of them taking their third year in college here. Class of 1923 Institute graduates 11 Technical High School 27 County High School 9 Total 47 Two of the institute graduates later completed the three year course. One of the high school graduates completed the two-years of college work here and two of them will graduate from the institute department at the close of this year. Class of 1924 Institute Graduates 14 Technical High School 44 Total 58 Two members of this class completed the three-year college course, one of them having been here for seven consecutive years. Class of 1925 Institute Graduates 6 Technical High School 51 Total 57 This was the first class to complete the three-years of college work. All six of these graduates had been graduates of the High School Department of T.P.I. at some time in the past. GRAND TOTAL 350 TENNESSEE TECH CO-EDS DEFEATS LOGAN COLLEGE In a game that was fast, and yet at the same time uninteresting, because it lacked that dash and vim so necessary to a good game of any kind. The Tennessee Tech Co-Eds defeated Logan College of Russellville, Ky. Monday night Feb 8th, 29 to 17. The Logan girls were visibly tired as a result of a long trip, but as the Tech girls were considerably below the form they had displayed the previous week in defeating the Nashville Y.W.C.A., the affair was about even. This is the first game Logan has lost this season, having previously defeated the strong Western Kentucky Normal team and others. Miss Shrader was outstanding in her efforts for Logan. In fact she is the equal of any center seen on the local court this season. Miss Shipley was high scorer of the game and for Tech with 14 points to her credit. Tech Line-Up Logan Shipley (14) R.F. (1) Belcher Shanks (4) L.F. (3) Morgan L. Whitson (11) C. (8) Shrader Moore R.G. M. Ellis Starnes L.G. Anderson Substitutions: Tech: McKeel for Starnes; A.P. Whitson for Moore; Van Hooser for Shanks. Logan: O’Neil (5) for Morgan: King for Ellis; Ellis for Anderson. King for Ellis; Ellis for Anderson. Referee: Wihite (Transylvania). Timer: Miller (Tech) Scorer: Robbins. “See here, young man,” stormed Mr. Officer from the hall at one in the morning, “do you think you can stay in the parlor with my daughter all night?” “I’ll try, sir,” replied the imperturbable Jobe modestly, “but I’m really afraid I’ll have to be leaving about four five o’clock.” EXCHANGE COLUMN A Boomerang When a bit of kindness hits ye, After passing of a cloud, When a bit of laughter gits ye An’ yer spine is feeling proud, Don’t forgit to up and fling it At a soul that’s feeling blue, For a moment that you sling it, It’s a Boomerang to you. “Face The Sun” Don’t grumble, don’t bluster, Don’t dream and don’t shirk. Don’t think of your worries, But think of your work. The worries will vanish, The work will be done. “No man sees his shadow Who faces the sun.” Something that runs in the best of families –silk hose. –The Babbler. THE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING The Administration Building was erected in 1912. In 1921, some additions were made bringing the total cost of the building to $110,000. The building contains the offices of the school administration, the auditorium, library, domestic science laboratory, Chemistry Laboratory, Gymnasium, Bookstore, and Fourteen Classrooms. EXCHANGE COLUMN A chaperon is an old maid who was sweet enough to eat in her young days, but none of her suitors were hungry. –Exchange. The Charleston The Charleston began when a farmer armed with a two pronged pitchfork and a hound dog with sharp teeth and a nasty disposition caught a worthless man in his chicken run. The farmer jabbed the colored boy with the pitch fork and that brought into being the first step of the Charleston. Then the dog attaches itself to the seat of the thief’s pants making movement number two. The dance steps, alternative from that point on with successive jabs from the pitchfork and bites by the dog ending in a grand climax as the colored boy cleared a six-foot tone wall in a frenzied bound. –The Blue and Gray EAST DORMITORY The East Dormitory was erected in 1916, at a cost of $35,000. It contains twenty-five Rooms, and the School Dining Hall is located in the basement of this building. WEST DORMITORY The West Dormitory is similar in cost and construction to the East Dormitory and was also erected in 1916. The Biology Laboratory is located in the basemen of the building. If You Were Busy If you were busy being kind, Before you know it you would find You’d soon forget to think it’s true That someone was unkind to you. If you were busy being glad And cheering people who were sad Although your heart would ache a bit You’d soon forget to notice it. If you were busy being good And doing just the best you could You’d not have time to blame some man Who’s doing just the best he can If you were busy being true To what you know you ought to do You’d be so busy you’d forget The blunders of the folks you met. If you were busy being right You’d find yourself too busy quite To criticize your neighbor long Because he’s busy being wrong. PREP CO-EDS WIN TWO GAMES Friday, Feb. 5th, the Prep Co-Eds played Algood in basket ball. The following girls plaed: Hazel Thompson –Forward Virginia Wilcox –Forward Estelle Wall –Guard Annie P. Whitson –Center Letha Capps –Center Mattie Whitson –Guard Mabel Cassity –Guard Mary F. Whitson –Forward. Due to a three division court, and six players, our girls were not as successful as had been expected. The forwards played well, Thompson scoring 4 and Wilcox 6 Wall, Cassity, and Whitson guarded well throughout the game. The team outclassed Algood in every way Score 10-3. Saturday, Feb. 6 the Prep Co-Eds played Monterey Annie Pearl Whitson was the star player in the game, caging 3 long field goals in the last 4 minutes of play. The forwards played a good game, Cassity scoring 2 and Shanks 3. The guards Cassity, Wall and Whitson fought a hard game, Score 11-10. INCREASED STIPEND FOR RHODES SCHOLARS Rhodes scholars from the United States and Canada during the past 20 years, according to a statement of the American secretary of the Rhodes Trust, have made almost identical academic records at Oxford University. Among the 420 candidates for appointment considered at the last election of scholars to enter the university in October, 1926, Ohio led with 30 candidates, and Pennsylvania had 30. The stipend has been increased recently and the 32 men elected will have an annual income of 400 each for the three years of their residence at Oxford. A Warning Wives of great all remind us Men may die any time And departing leave behind them Widows more or less sublime. Widows that perhaps another Traveling through this vale of tear A bereaved and forlorn brother Might take on in spite of years They are zealous, they are earnest And a man their only goal. When they try to do their earnest You had better hunt a hole. --the babbler THE TECH ORACLE Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute Printed by The Herald Publishing Co. Entered as Second Class matter at the Cookeville Postoffice, Cookeville, Tenn. EDITORIAL STAFF Editor-in-Chief Bryce D. Stone ’26 Assistant Editor Edward McKay ‘27 Assistant Editor Nola Quarles ‘27 ASSOCIATE EDITORS Athletics M. Douglas Robbins ‘27 Wit and Humor Robert Cox ‘30 Exchange Elizabeth Ensor ‘28 Classes Martha Sedivak ‘27 Society Sheila Officer ‘29 Alumni Hazel Wall ‘27 Literary Mary Crenshaw ‘27 BUSINESS Business Manager Lee S. Darwin ‘27 Asst. Cir. Manager Robt. Smith ‘27 Asst. Cir. Manager David Terry ‘29 Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY In a recent speech to the Chapel assembly President Smith spoke of loan funds and scholarships as being a desirable aid in building up a school. We are glad to announce that plans have already been worked out for the establishment of at least one scholarship to Tech. Details of the plan will be published later. Also, in regard to the plan for student speaking campaign we have thought for some time that students could, with proper organizations get as good or better results through this means than faculty members have gotten. But regardless of the origin or novelty of the ideas, they are good ones, and we should use them for all they are worth. Tech is a growing institution, and is now in a stage of development where every student can do something tangible towards aiding the school to increase its scope of usefulness. Do not let the opportunity pass. If you have an idea or a suggestion for improvement, take it to the administration or to some student organization. But remember that there is a remote possibility that your idea may not be practical, so do not get disappointed if it is not immediately adopted. The world is an echo that returns to each of us what we say. –Emerson. VALUE OF A COLLEGE EDUCATION The uppermost question in the mind of nearly every young man is how to achieve success and gain financial independence. There have been many men who by clean living and honest effort alone have reached positions of trust and honor in the hearts of their friends and acquaintances even though the years brought them nothing in the way of financial reward. Such a life has its compensations, but does not a man owe himself and his family something more than just the means of keeping the proverbial wolf barely from the door? The average man must think so since one of his greatest goals is to be able to enjoy a reasonable number of life’s luxuries. Bearing that thought in mind our young men energetically set forth with a high ambition to figuratively conquer the world. Entirely too many try to plunge themselves quite unprepared into the business world. What is the result? They find themselves hopelessly stranded and unable to compete with the vocationally trained men who surge over their heads every day. It is possible, of course, for a person whose education in limited to push himself into prominence by sheer common sense and will power. He can get by on this mixture of nerve, bluff, and experience; nevertheless, such a person will always be at a disadvantage in competition with trained men with an educational background. The old age is gone, and many of its axioms have been discarded. There is a college within reach of everyone. The man who fails today has no excuse and only himself to blame. The idea that colleges are institutions only for the rich and privileged has no foundation. American colleges are based upon no such principles. Indeed the very opposite is true. A college is the gateway to success. It is founded with the purpose of keeping young men of little or moderate means to become successful and capable of enjoying fuller life. On the other hand a college graduate is not given success on a golden platter the day he gets his diploma. He is prepared to fight and work for it intelligently; and when he gains prosperity he is able to enjoy it to the fullest and to spend his money for the good of himself and others. The way is open to all, but there is little time to hesitate. As said before, the old age with its standard is gone. The standard of today is most exacting, and the person who falls short is left behind and pushed into oblivion. FRIENDSHIP Friendship, peculiar boon of heav’n. The noble mind’s delight and pride To men and angels only giv’n To all the lower world deny’d --S. Johnson There is no friend like an old friend Who has shared our morning days, No greeting like his welcome, No homage like his praise --O.W. Holmes There is no better book In life, than a wise friend; For with his teaching-look His teaching-voice shall blend. --Calderson. A speaker comes to the chapel Some wise words to say He looks at the student body And then says “Let us pray.” --The blue and gray. OLD FASHIONED VALENTINE PARTY One of the most look-forward to events in Tech’s school year took place Saturday evening, Feb. 13, when the B.L.S. and S.L.S. entertained with their annual Valentine social in the form of an Old Fashioned Party. The halls and auditorium were beautifully decorated with red hearts and red and white streamers. On the stage a large red heart covered with smaller hearts held the secret of the most interesting contest of the evening. The young men shot arrows toward the heart and the small heart which they chanced to pierce contained the name of their partner for the remainder of the evening. The handsome and stately 18th century couples found one of their chief diversions in the gymnasium in the form of the Virginia Rell, which followed the grand March. In this Miss Mamye Gibson and escort were awarded the prize as the best costumed couple. Various other contests and amusements were enjoyed which proved equally interesting. Delicious refreshments consisting of brick cream, cakes and nuts, carrying out the Valentines idea were served. Tiny, red, heartshaped baskets were the lovely and unusual favors. It was a new, well planned and splendid party and one in which every guest seemed to throw himself with abandon and the single view of a good time for everyone. CAMPUS GOSSIP Jess Clark has decided to sell books again, beginning June 1. Bob Rose was seen driving with a young lady who formerly drove with Lochinvar Puckett. Trouble brewing. Fred Terry is trying to borrow $500 by June 1. Wonder why? Some dire calamity will surely overtake us, since the “Dean” has turned evolutionist, and Mr. McClanahan is now espousing the cause of fundamentalism. James Miller’s mustache seems to need pruning. Those visiting McMinnville last week were Lee Darwin and James Carlen. Simon “Selling” Suggs hasn’t offered anything new for more than a week. NEWS NOTES Among our visitors at chapel for the last few days was Mr. Coley, a traveling secretary from Bowling Green Business College. He made an interesting talk, telling us something of their school. Another visitor of much interest was Mrs. Graham secretary of Presbyterian Board of Missions. “Our Relation to Foreign Countries.” The points and illustrations she brought out made us consider the other part of the world. The Prince of “Wails” now wails louder but less frequently. MARY N. MURFREE –ONE OF OUR TENNESSEE WRITERS By Mary Crenshaw In the period immediately following the civil war there was very little literature produced in the South, and most of this was poetry. We have our supreme Southern poet—Lanier, who gave utterance to the feelings and aspirations of our entire Southland. Timrod and Hayne of South Carolina, although not as great as Lanier, helped to perpetrate Southern ideals in poetry. But during this period there was little fiction written. In 1884, “In the Tennessee Mountains” a volume of stories, was written by Miss Mary N. Murfree under the pen name, Charles Egbert Craddock. Other stories followed from her pen. In 1887 another book of short stories, “In Ole Virginia” was written by Thomas Nelson Page. These provided the stimuli for other Southern stories. Thus Miss Murfree became a leader in Southern fiction. Charles Egbert Craddock interests us not only as a Southern story writer but also because she was a Tennessean. She was the great grand-daughter of Colonel Hardy N. Murfree of revolutionary war fame and for whom the town of Murfreesboro in 1850. When a child, she had a stroke of paralysis which left her lame and could not play with other children she became a great reader and scholar. As the family fortune was greatly reduced after the civil war they moved a number of times, going from Nashville back to Grantlands and then to St. Louis. At St. Louis, Miss Murfree and her only sister, Fanny, attended a girls seminary. After they had finished school there they moved back to Murfreesboro Miss Murfree continued to devote her time to very extensive reading. As her father was a lawyer she became greatly interest in law and even wrote a book on the subject. In recognition of this, the University of the South conferred on her the honorary degree of L.L.D. However, the subject of law was not her chosen field, for she began to write stories of life in the Tennessee Mountains, where she had spent much of her time. The people there interested her; and she created many beautiful stories about them and their ways of living. Her stories appeared in the living. Her stories appeared in the Atlantic Monthly, always under the name of Charles Egbert Craddock. It was several years before her identity was known. In fact she had created much interest among critics and north men of letters, none of whom suspected that the writer was a woman. After she had published a number of stories, she went to New York, at the request of her publishers. When she was announced to them, they were completely surprised to find that Charles Craddock was a woman. Miss Murfree never married but she and her sister, Fanny, lived a very quiet life in Murfreesboro. Later in life she had very serious trouble with her eyes. They were afflicted with cataract growths and an operations was performed which was unsuccessful and she became totally blind. Although crippled and blind she was always cheerful, and cordial to her friends. She died in September, 1922. Miss Murfree’s stories are interesting because they picture a type of real life that is romantic in its simplicity and its natural air and pitiful in its ignorance and superstition. The settings are found in the East Tennessee mountains –one of the most beautiful regions of the entire South, while the characters are true mountaineers. The author has treated her subjects with a freshness and fidelity born of a keen perception and a complete familiarity with what was typical and appealing in them. Not only has she written as one who understands and sympathizes with the rugged conditions of mountain life and with the veracity of its people. And above all she tells the story well. Her descriptions are beautiful and are used to create the proper atmosphere for the story. She knew the dialect of the people and she let them tell the story in this dialect, thus adding a flavor and a charm she could not have attained in any other way. She does not criticize nor ridicule the people but shows them as nature made them. Superstition plays a great part in the life of these people and our author makes very interesting as well as weird stories based on this element. One of the best of these is “Phantoms of the Foot-Bridge.” She has not created any outstanding characters, yet she has certainly individualized her characters and made them live for us. “The Haint that walks Chilhowee” is one of her most typical stories. In this story superstition plays an important part. The author shows the people’s ignorance of law and life in the “valley.” We see something of the customs of the mountaineers’ family life. Not only do we get a good picture of the life in the mountains but also of the characters –and we must sympathize with the heroin, Clarise, in her narrow world of superstition and ignorance. Even if Miss Murfree’s stories are never classed with the truly great in literature, her work assures her an honored place among the Southern writers of her generation. Y.W.C.A. Miss Betty Webb, national Y.W.C.A. secretary, who is making a tour of the Y.W. organizations met with the group at this institution on Feb. 13. In a delightfully informal manner Miss Webb outlined the World Student Friendship fund project making suggestions whereby our small band might contribute to this international student movement, which is occupying a chief place of importance in Y.W.C.A. work at present. The plan is raising a fund for aiding needy students in all parts of the world, thus establishing friendly relations with students across the sea. The charming personality and business-like efficiency of Miss Webb won the admiration of all who came in contact with her. WILL YOUR WIFE LOVE YOU? Some writer asserts that “a French woman will love her husband if he is either witty or chivalrous; a German woman if he is constant and faithful; and Dutch woman if he does not disturb her ease and comfort too much; a Spanish woman if he wreaks vengeance on those who incur his displeasure; and Italian woman if he is dreamy and poetical; a Danish woman if he thinks that her native country is the brightest and happiest on earth; a Russian woman if he despised all Westerns as miserable Barbarians; an English woman if he succeeds in ingratiating himself with the court and the aristocracy; and American woman, if –he has plenty of money.” THE BEST YOU CAN By Nola Quarles What use to frown when things go wrong? A frown won’t set them right Be brave of heart, and sing a song To make the burden light. That this is true I quite believe He is the wisest man Who sings when care and trouble come. And does the best he can The man who broods o’er trouble finds His burdens heavier grow, As he climbs up the hill of life The wise man does not so. He gathers flowers beside the way; He says to fellow-man; “Let’s make the most of pleasant things And—do the best we can.” Think and Grin When Louise Woods Fainted Doctor No. 1: “Did you hold the mirror to her face to see if she was still breathing?” Doctor No. 2: “Yes, and she opened one eye, gasped and reached for her powder puff!” Suggs: “Don’t tell a soul, but I need five bucks.” McKay: “You can depend on me. I shall act as if you had not said a word to me about.” McCoin: “How are you?” Frank Hall: “Rotten. I’ve gotten insomnia.” McCoin: “How come?” Hall: “Woke up twice this morning in Geometry class.” “This soup isn’t fit for a pig.” Said the indignant Buford Murphy. “I will take it away,” said the waiter, “and bring you some that is.” “You will notice,” said the eccentric physics teachers as he placed his fingers on a piece of mechanism and seized the handle, “that this machine is turned by a crank.” And he wondered at the titter that went round the class. I hear that you have lost your valuable dog, Mr. McClanahan,” said a sympathetic friend. “Yes, in a railway accident. I was saved, but the dog wasn’t, “replied Mr. Mac. “Goodness! What a pity!” “Count!” McKay: “May I call this evening?” Lucille Cameron: “Oh! I’d be tickled.” “Count”: “Aw, I’m not that kind of a boy.” Mr. Hudgens: “Why is it that you are always at the bottom of the class?” Joe Frank: “Oh! I doesn’t make any difference. They teach the same at both ends.” Obliging Book Agent (entering Governor’s office): Pardon me, sir. Clement Governor (reaching for pardon slip): Certainly. What did you do? Sick Man: “The doctor has given me a month to live.” Jew: “Iss ye insured?” S.M: “Yes.” Jew: “Den vy worry?” Grocer: “So you want a job, eh? Do you ever tell lies?” William Massa: “No. But I’m willing to learn.” It’s torture “Talk about torture—” “Yes?” “nothing is worse than sitting in a barber’s chair with your mouth full of lather, watching the boy trying to give another customer your new $6 hat.” Rah! Rah! Rah! Steam Captain (who had just fallen overboard): Don’t stand there like a dumbbell! Give a yell, can’t you? Green student deckband: Certainly, sir. Captain! Rah! Rah! Rah! Captain! Sunday Morning Customer: Give me change for a dime, please. Druggist: Sure. And I hope you enjoy the sermon. Three of a Kind Jessie Beau (waiting for her to come down stairs): Is Jessie your oldest sister? Kid Brother: Yep. Jessie Beau: And who comes after her? Kid Brother: You and two other guys. TECH VANQUISHES BETHEL The highly-touted basket ball team of Bethel College, Russellville, Ky., received a rather rude jolt Tuesday night, Feb. 2, thanks to a revamped but aggressive, Tech team. Tech had much the better of a 44 to 23 contest, despite the fact that two regulars –Watson and Winningham –were missing from the line-up. Nothing daunted, however, Tech went in and come out with more spirit and desire to win than has been shown in any game of the present season. The game was rather rough, probably due to this aggressive spirit, but it was a fair one at that. And if such a spirit wins ball games, and we are inclined to think that, it does, give us more of it. put Tech on the map. Jobe was a individual star of the game, if there was one, having 18 points to his credit. He caged them from all angles with equal ease. M.L. Robbins played a good game, and added 10 points to the evening’s totals. For Bethel, Reynolds, who scored 10 points, was the whole show. Tech Line-Up Bethel Jobe (18) R.F. (10) Reynolds Lewis (3) L.F. (2) Gish Moss (8) C (3) Bush R. Robbins (2) R.G. (6) Higgins Davis (1) L.G. (2) Baker Substitutions: Tech: M. Robbins (1) for Lewis; Lewis for Jobe; Denny (2) for Moss. Bethel; Sanders for Gish; Brandenburg for Reynolds; Higgins for Bush for Higgins; Sanders for Higgins. Referee: Houtchens (Tulane). Timer: Miller (Tech). Scorers: Robbins (Tech) –Sanders (Bethel). Moss: “Is he mean?” Jelly: “Mean? Say, that guy should have apologized to the doctor when he was born.” Most marriage ties are made of beau knots. East Tennessee Teachers’ College will confer degrees on approximately 40 students at the end of the present school year. Careful psychological tests have revealed that eighty-five per cent of women are inherently insincere. We are forced to wonder how long the other fifteen per cent. Have been dead. –The Babbler. At 6 she wants a candy store, at 16 a box of sweets, at 26 a “sweet papa.” –highland Echo. The age of adolescence is when a girl begins to powder and a boy begins to puff. –The Stampede.

1926 February 20

 The Tech Oracle Vadus Carmack Elected Editor-In_Chief of 1927-28 Tech Oracle David Terry Reelected Business manager and Alfred Gill Elected Circulation Manager. At the annual Tech Oracle Staff Banquet on the evening of April 20 Vadus Carmack was elected editor-in-chief of the Tech Oracle for next year. Mr Carmack ahs been the poet on the staff this year and has been contributed many interesting articles other than poetry. He will be a Senior next year and there is no doubt but that he will publish a good paper. Mr. Terry has been a very efficient manager during the past year and has already shown his ability as a business man. Mr. Gill has had experience as assistant circulation manager this year will fill the manager’s place well. T. Club Banquet Held at Methodist Church on May 6 The second annual T. Club banquet took place May 6, in the Sunday School rooms of the Methodist Church. The following Delicious menu was served: Iced Fruit Cocktail, Fried Chicken, Mashed Potatoes, String Beans, Blushing Apples, Rolls, Tomato Salad, Strawberries with whipped cream and Angel cake. Besides the active members of the club present, there were a number of old letter men and women who are honrary members of the club. The program consisted of the following: (1) Football outlook for 1927 –Alva Starnes, Captain. (2) Basketball –Gradis Winningham, Captain (3) Girl’s Basketball –Lucy Whitson, Captain. (4) Baseball –Arlie Moss, Captain (5) Athletics in General –Dr. Howard. (6) Relation of Athletics to Studies –Mr. Lane. (7) Response –Coach Overall. Four New Members Added to Faculty The increased enrollment for the spring short term has necessitated some additional instructors for various departments. M.E.V. Hendrix, a graduate from the University of Tennesse and for the past year principal for the Robertsfield High School at Edgemoor Tennessee, is assisting Mr. Lane in the education department. Mr. W.R. Rogers is instructor in English and History. Mr. Rogers received his B.S. and Master’s degrees in the University of Tennessee and for the past year has been a student in the Southern Baptist Seminary at Louisville, Kentucky. Mr. J.O. West, was principal of the Oneida High School for two years and has also worked in the Robbins High School. He received his training at center () in the Science Department. Miss Stella Gooch is dietician of the dining hall. She is a graduate of Peabody and was formerly manager of the dining hall at the Middle Tennessee Teachers College. Before coming to T.P.I she was dietician at the Nashville General Hospital. “Pirates of Penzance” By T.P.I. Glee Clubs “The Pirate of Penzance” is a Gilbert and Sullivan comic opera in two acts. The two glee clubs of T.P.I. under the direction of Miss Tennie Alma Stanton, head of the music Department, are preparing to give this opera on May 18. The story of the opera is as follows; Fredic, when only a small child was apprenticed to a pirate chief until his twenty-first birthday. This was a through a mistake of his nurse, Ruth, who was told to apprentice him to a pilot. The first act begins with a band of pirates, who are celebrating Frederic’s twenty-first birthday, as he has now become a real pirate, and is an apprentice no longer. Frederic surprises them by saying that he is going to leave them s his apprenticeship is over. Ruth becomes very much alarmed and begs to accompany him as his wife. Frederic never having seen any other woman doesn’t know that she is old and ugly, and decides to marry her. Then the voices of young maidens are heard, and when Frederic sees the difference between them and Ruth, he renounces his old nurse. He is charmed with the beauty of the young girls and offers himself to any one of them. Then all refuse him except Mabel who loves and pities him. As Mabel Frederic and the girls are planning to get away the pirates appear. Each () seizes a girl and they announce that they think this is a first rate opportunity to get married. The Major-General, who is the father of the girls, comes in and asked them to have pity on his lonely state, as he is an orphan and would miss his lovely daughters. So now, it is one of the pirates rules never to harm an orphan, so they release them. In the second act the girls are trying to console their father –the pirates have learned that he has told a terrible story about being an orphan and they are planning to attack again. Frederic is willing to help the Major-General and his daughters as he is now free from the pirates, so with a company of policemen, he prepares to fight the pirates. Then the pirate King and Ruth come to tell Frederic that he is still apprenticed to the pirates for he was born on Feburary 29, and that his twenty-first birthday will not be reached until 1940. Frederic, who has a keen sense of duty goes back to the band. The pirates creep up to the hiding place of Major-General and when they are discovered there is a struggle between them and the police. The police are overcome by pirates who in the turn give up to the police as they are asked to surrender in the name of the Queen. Ruth then discloses a secret: the pirates are all noblemen who have gone wrong. The Major-General then willingly gives his daughters to the expirates who plan to resume their legislative duties. The cast of characters is as follows: Richard, the pirate King; James Green. Frederic, the pirate apprentice; Oyama Winningham Major-General Stanley, of the British Army; Robert Smith Edward, Sergeant of Police; Leonard Crawford. Mabel, General Stanley’s youngest daughter; Dannie Wright Jarvis General Stanley’s daughters. Kate; Virgie Lowery Edith; Bulah Allison Isabel; Elsie Young Ruth, a piratical “Maid of all work”; Emily Stanton General Stanley’s other daughters: Sammie Ruth Womack, Muriel Gipson, Elise Biles, Millie White, Jessie Bar, Ellen Rash, Josephine Carrington, Bertie Brown and Lucile Camerson. Pirates and policemen: Bill Breeding, Clem Allen Womack, Donald Moore, Clyde McDonald, Armon Clark, Eugene Woods, Herman Matheny, and Wallace Mitchell. May Day Festival Enjoyed by Tech Students on May First Miss Rebecca Johnston Crowned Queen of May. –Music and Natural Dancing Featured Program. One of the most attractive programs given at T.P.I. this year was that celebrating May Day. The feature of the day was the cornwing of Miss Rebecca Johnston, a senior, who had been elected by the student body as queen of the May. The following girls were selected to serve as maids to the Queen: Mrs. Eddie Watson and Misses Sammie Ruth Womack, Louise Settle, Lucile Lee, Dan Jarvis, Mary Nilla Graham, Maurine Quarles, Margaret Darwin, Bertie Brown, and Eleanor Haile. Master Thomas Passons acted as crownbearer and the the little Misses McClanahan and Foster served as train () bearers. The approach of the queen was herald by Misses Hazel Thompson and Lena Breeding. The maids wore dresses of organdie in the pastel shades with picture hats of harmonizing colors. The train-bearers wore dainty hand-made voile frocks of lavender and green. The queen was attired in a dress of white flat crepe combined with lace. After the crowning of the queen the audience was entertained by a group of natural dancers who gave a dance of Greetings, Old Rustic, and the Scarf Dance. These dancers were Misses Mary Ellen Rash, Agnes Greenwood, Muriel and Kathleen Gipso. The next number was a dance by the maids. Following this was the May Pole Dance given by Misses Carrie High, Lucile Cameron, Shelah Officer, Grace Wheat, Jessie Barnes, Beulah Allison, Pearl Cornwell, Jonny Bilbrey. Hazel Swafford, Pauline Hudgens, Anna Henry, and Elsie Young. Music for the dances was played by Miss Virginia Wilcox, while Miss Tennie Alma Stanton rendered the march for the processional and recessional. Following the recessional punch was dispensed from an attractive booth. The T.P.I. Orchestra played several numbers. The program was repeated before the Cookeville Lions club at the City School auditorium Monday night at 8:00 o’clock. The affair was directed y Miss Carolyn McClanahan, head of the Physical Department for women, and the costumes were designed by Miss Margaret Johnson, of the Home Economics Department. “Tech Oracle” Staff Hold Banquet The Staff of the “Tech Oracle” held its annual banquet at the Shanks hotel on Wednesday evening, April 20. The banquet table had as its centerpiece a beautiful basket of purple iris, Cutt glass candle sticks tied with purple ribbon held gold candles, spaced along the middle of the table. Place cards and menu cards carried out the purple and gold color-scheme, of the table decorations and the menu was in harmony with it. Miss Hazel Wall, the efficient editor-in-chief of the “Oracle” for the past year was toastmistress for the occasion. Mr. J.M. Hatfield faculty advisor, who has been loyal, faithful and has rendered much aid to the Staff, was the first speaker of the evening; He started the program with a “peppy” talk in which he commended the work of the past year and gave hopes for a successful future. Next Harry Burrows gave a unique lecture, “At The Bat” which showed his skill at making and delivering speeches, Then, Miss Lucile Lee caused an uproar of merriment when she told “The Joke of The Scar.” Next on program was Robert Smith who sang to the accompaniment of his ukulele a number of popular songs. Appreciation of his singing was shown by requests for more, to which he gallantly responded. Last, Vadus Carmack, the poet, read two beautiful poems of his own composition which verified () the fact that he is a “real poet”. After the program the election for 1927-28 Staff was held. Vadus Carmack was elected editor-in-chief for the ensuing year, insuring the success of the “Tech Oracle”. David Terry re-elected for business manager. He has been a capable and efficient worker for the past year and assures T.P.I. of a prosperous paper for next year. Albert Gill was also re-elected. He has been the untiring circulating manager and gives promise of a more active future. These newly elected Staff members will select their assistants at the opening of Fall term of 1927. They are excellent students, true workers, and highly deserving the honor which has been bestowed upon them. The evening’s entertainment was concluded with an extemporaneous speech from each member of the Staff who had not appeared on the program. With much trembling and merriment the banquet was concluded and the Staff proclaimed it was the biggest, best and jollied banquet ever had by a “Tech Oracle” Staff. 160 Students Enrolled at Beginning of Spring Short Term The enrollment of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute is the largest in its history, the freshman college class alone having a greater number of students than were enrolled in the entire college department last year. One hundred and sixty students from various countries over the state were enrolled during the last week, making a total enrollment for the year of five hundred and sixty. The Senior College Class has thirty-four enrolled at president, the second year college forty-five, the first year college class, two hundred and sixty-seven, the fourth year high school class seventy-eight, and the third year high school class seventy-two. All the dormitories are filled to their capacity and many students are boarding in town. A large number come from the near-by towns every day, some driving twenty-five miles. Annual Picnic to be Held on May 24 The annual picnic this year will be at Ozone and Waldensia on the edges of Cumberland and Roane Counties. The places selected are noted for their mild mountain scenery. Beautiful falls are at Ozone and a deep lake for swimming and fishing is at Waldensia. Probably the latter place will be visited during the forenoon and Ozone later. Perhaps a stop of one hour will be made at Crossville on the return trip. As usual, Mr. Hamilton, Tennessee Central Agent at Cookeville is doing all he can to make the train service as excellent as possible. “Ezra, tomorrow is our 25th wedding anniversary; hadn’t we better kill a chicken?” “Why punish the chicken for what happened 25 years age?” Most of the fire in the modern girl’s eye is quenched by the water on their brain. Junior-Senior High School Receptions The Junior High School class entertained the Senior class with a delightful informal Reception, Saturday evening, May the seventh at 8 o’clock in the administration building. The main event of the evening was Treasure Hunt, in which many unique treasures were found. At the close of the evening delicious refreshments were served. Progress of the Shakespearean Play The first full rehearsal of “The Taming of the Shrew” was held Wednesday evening, May 11, and every member of the cast made a creditable showing. This play requires a cast of thirty. In the present cast thirteen Counties are represented. The costumes and scenery have been ordered and the presentation on May 31 will mark another successful event in the history of the institution. Gordonsville Beat T.P.I. Egalets The Reservers suffered their second defeat in the last three games when they met Gordonsville on the local field April 27. The visitors snatched a 2 score lead in the first inning and again added twins in the fourth. Although the locals put out all they had, they were never within real scoring distance. Score by innings: Gordonsville 200 200 000-4 Reserves 000 000 000-0 The Tech Oracle Official Publication of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Published Semi-Monthly Subscription Rates $1.50 Per Year Editorial Staff Editor-in-Chief Hazel Wall Assistant Editor Eleanor Haile Assistant Editor Benton M. Carr Associate Editors Athletic Harry Burrow Wit and Humor Robert Smith Exchange Alberta Cassetty Class Editor Luccille Lee Society Odell Cornwell Alumni Rebecca Johnston Feature Editor Jonnie Billbrey Poet Vadus Carmack Business Manager David Terry Assistant Business Manager Circulation Manager Paul Tidwell Asst. Circulation Manager Alfred Gill Faculty Advisor J.M. Hatfield Printed by Herald Publishing Company. Entered at the Cookeville Post Office. Second-class rate pending. Tech and the Upper Cumberland What has Tennessee Tech meant to this section of the state? First of all it has furnished work for ambitious students above the high school. The teaching ranks of the Upper Cumberland section have been strengthened and revitalized by this institution. Students go out to places of leadership in their respective communities with a broader, deeper vision and a profound sense of their responsibility in this new social and economic order; and above all they have the training commensurate with the task before them. The Upper Cumberland is rapidly undergoing a change or a series of changes which vitally affect our social, political, and economic life. The rising generation is putting new blood into the fight, the added punch that brings victory is coming from the students of today. Tech is responsible for most of this. We are breaking away from the old moorings of superstition, hide-bound precedent, and intellectual, social, and religious bigotry and intolerance. What is bringing about this new social order? Education. Free and unhampered education is doing more for our people today than any other force. Tech is the center of this educational system in this section and deserves most of the credit for the improvement that has been made. The fact that this institution has outgrown its buildings and equipment is proof that students from half the counties of Tennessee, and four other states realize the opportunities this school has to offer. In the very nature of things the Upper Cumberland has been benefitted more than remote sections. Students have been able to come here for their high school and college work when the opportunity was denied them elsewhere, due chiefly to the economic factor, Tennessee Polytechnic Institute is the greatest force in this section of the state for its material development. I make this statement without fear of a successful contradiction. Our Alma Mater has been to us an oasis in an educational desert, a light-house set on a hill, a power house and a revitalization force such as never touched our lives before. When we leave her, let us be true and ever remember what she has done for. Our debt is heavy. Let us pay it in service to our people. Statistics These wonderful statistics! They tell us now that Colleen Moore, movie star, gets 15,00 “fan letters” every month; Clara Bow, 11,000; and Mary Pickford only 2,000. Lon Chaney, strange to say, leads the male list for letter totals, with John Gilbret and Richard Dix close behind. Ten per cent of this mail comes from people of Polish extraction. They want the pictures that are always sent in return. Many of them never go to the films, it is said, and gets their information from the posters –but a postcard brings a beautiful picture. These photographs, wrapping, and mailing cost the motion picture companies twelve cents each. The large companies pay this charge for their prominent stars, but pity the poor independent who has to foot her own expenses in order to keep “her public” contended. George Sidney, Oliver Borden, and others set side $250 weekly for this purpose –Outlook. $150,000 Appropriated for New Buildings The general Appropriation Bill which was recently passed by the Legislature gives to T.P.I. $150,000 for buildings and $110,000 per year or maintenance. It has not been determined what buildings this fund will be used for, as the State Board of Education will have charge of the building program, but it is thought that a science building, a dining hall and cafeteria, and a gymnasium will be erected. There are some prospects of having an observation school on the campus before very long. This, with $5,000 worth of new library books which are to be added soon, will make the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute a complete teachers training institution. Donald Moore Wins Gold Medal on Essay Donald Moore a student in the department of Vocational Agriculture of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute won the gold medal offered for the best essay by any student studying agriculture under Smith-Hughes teachers of vocational agriculture or any other club member in the 4-H Clubs in Middle Tennessee. There were several thousand contestants in this contest and it took both ability and work to win. Commencement Speakers It is interesting to note the different speakers who have delivered Commencement Addresses and Sermons since the school was established. The list is given below. Elder N.B. Hardeman will deliver the Commencement Sermon for the class of 1927. It is not known who will deliver the address to this class. 1917 –Sermond, Dr. J.H. Stevenson. Address, Mr. T.K. Sisk. 1918 –Sermon, Judge C.E. Snodgrass Address, Dr. Carey Morgan. 1919 –Sermon, Rev. W.S. Claiborne. Address, Dr. J.I. Vance. 1920 –Sermon, Elder Nolan. Address, Judge J.M. Gardenhire 1921 –Sermon, Dr. T.N. Ivey. Address, Mr. Harry Clark. 1922 –Sermon, Elder E.A. Elam Address, Mr. R.L. Jones 1923 –Sermon, Dr. W.P. Stephenson Address, Bishop Maxon. 1024 –Sermon, Judge C.E. Snodgrass Address, Dean Malcolm MrDermott. 1925 –Sermon, Dr. W.H. Dubose. Address, Dr. Shelton J. Phelps. 1927 –Sermon, Elder N.B. Hardeman. Address, ……………….. Contestants for Essay Medal Seven young ladies have entered the essay contest which will be held on Saturday morning May 7 from eight to twelve o’clock. The subject is “The Business Aspect in the Woman’s Life”, and the winner of this contest will be awarded a gold medal, given by Dr. Z.L. Shipley of Cookeville, at commencement. The Belles Lettres Literary Society will be represented by Thelma Music, Elsie Biles, Kathleen Simmons, and Bertha Dunavin. The Palladian Literary Society will be represented by Jonnie Bilbrey, Florence Winfree, and Lucile Thompson. Senior College Class The Seniors had a delightful evening outing on Friday evening April 29, in the form of a hike to Breeding’s mill. Nineteen persons went, including Mr. and Mrs. Overall, the Chaperones, and everybody reported a jolly time. The delegation left the campus about 4:30 and reached the destination about 5:15. Several sandwiches had already been prepared, and cooking utensils were carried to cook, bacon and eggs. All were amply fed, and Eugene Collier ate the remainder. The crowd departed about 3:00, and most of them attended the picture show. Those attended the outing were: Misses Ruth, and Nola Quarles, Lee, G. Whitaker, Wall, Haile, P. Cornwell, Bracey and Johnston; Messrs G. Winningham, Rose, P. Neely, Carlen, Collier, B.M. Carr, Scott, and Johnston; Mr. and Mrs. Overall Chaperones. Cookeville Girl Wins Honor in Oratorical Contest Miss Mary Frances McDerman Wins Way to Semi-finals in Know The South Contest Miss Mary Frances McDearman, one of Cookeville’s most gifted young artists who is a student at the Woman’s College of Alabama, at Montgomery, has added another honor to her long list of honors and to her school by winning the oratorical contest at Auburn where she won over representatives from leading colleges and universities of the South. Miss McDearman will go soon to the Ashville, N.C. National Semifinal Oratorical contest. Another honor given Miss McDearman by her school recently was that she was chosen to represent in the State Contest. Last year she won a similar contest. She won the T.P.I. Reading Contest when a high school student of that institution. Following the close of the school year she will return to Cookeville for a short visit with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.C. McDearman, before going to Ward-Belmont to student again under Miss Pauline S. Towsand. Miss Towsand classes Miss McDearman as one of the most gifted readers among her pupils. –Putnam Co. Herald. Banner Presented to Burritt College On Tuesday May 3, a delegation from the Banner, which the Burrit Preps won in the Upper Cumberland Boy’s Basketball Tournament. The persons making the trip were Messrs Overall, Smith, Passons, Terry, Richardson, and Johnston. A program arranged by the school was supplemented by speeches by the gentlemen from T.P.I. The delegation left Cookeville at 5:30 A.M. and had breakfast on the mountain. The program was arranged for 8:00, and all were back in school at 11:00. Miss Margaret Killeffer Becomes Bride of L. Harris The wedding of Miss Margaret Killeffer and Luther Harris was quietly solemnized at the home of Rev. and Mrs. A.C. Killeffer, parents of the bride, on Monday Morning, May 2, at 6:30 o’clock in the presence of a limited number of friends and releatives. The bride was led to an alter by her brother Lewis Killeffer while Mendelsson’s wedding march was softly played by Miss Anna Lena Livingston. Little Miss Mildred Milligan who bore the bridal train was the bride’s only attendant. Leonard Dunavin served as best man, and the bride’s father, Rev. Killeffer performed the ceremony. The bride was lovely in a gown of white crepe and lace veil with orange blossoms. She carried a beautiful bouquet of bride’s roses and lilies of the valley. Miss Killeffer was formerly a student of T.P.I having graduated from highschool here in 1921. Since that time she has been a student at the University of Tenn. And a most valuable primary teacher of both Putnam and Overton county. The groom was also a former student of T.P.I. and of University of Tennessee. He is at present the Superintendent of Public Schools of Overton County. Dean Smith Delivers Commencement Add. On the night of April 26 Dean A.W. Smith made the Commence address at Byrdstown in the presence of a graduating class of eight. On the following day seven of these students had matriculated at the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute and during the summer school the eighth one is to be in this institution. Last year the graduating class of the Pickett County High School consisted of two young ladies, both of whom are now students in the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Several of the junior class are also students here this term. The Pickett County High School was established only a ew years ago and has had a very remarkable growth. This year It enrolled sixty-five high school students. This makes the fourth Commencement address that Dean Smith has made within the last few months. At ten o’clock on May 17 Dean Smith is to make the Commencement Address to the graduating class at the White County High School at Sparta. Quite a number of the graduates from this school have been coming to Tennessee Polytechnic Institute and have shown that they have had a very through foundation in the high school subjects. These students have already made good and their presence is appreciated by the administration and student body. The Belles Lettres Society The Belles Lettres met April 18 in the auditorium to try out the readers for the reading contest. At this meeting it was decided to postpone the tryout until some old members should come in at the beginning of the spring short term. April 26 the Belles Lettres met in the regular meeting room and gave “Mother Goose Up-To Date”. The program was enjoyed by both students and visitors. Miss Carmack, Miss Bohannon, and Belles Lettres sponsor Mr. Lane, each made an interesting talk. The Essay contests for the Belles Lettres are Thelma Music, Kathleen Simmons, Bertha Dunavin, and Elsie Biles. Two girls who were visiting the Palladian Literary Society sent their names in to the Belles Lettres expressing their desire to become members. The Society accepted them. There being no further business the Society adjourned. Y.W.C.A. Saturday night, April 23 the Y.W. and Y.M.C.A. gave a banquet to which the dormitory students were invited. After the banquet was over both organization elected officers for the following year. The officers for the Y.W.C.A. are as follows: Persident –Auby Scott. Vice Pres. –Elsie Praper. Sect. and Treas. –Rosalene Ledbetter. Chm. Of Prog. Com. –Hazel Swafford. Counselor –Miss Rose. Miss Rose and Mr. Kittrell were present and both made splendid talks. Miss Weaver, the out going president made a interesting farewell speech. Miss Scott expressed her appreciation of the honor done her. Resolution Passed By he Executive Council of The T.P.I. Alumni Association The sum of one hundred dollars shall be set aside each year from the annual membership dues and other funds of the T.P.I. Alumni Association for the establishment of two cash scholarships of fifty dollars each, hereafter known as the Alumni Scholarships, one each for the young women and the young men of the first year college class of T.P.I. These scholarships shall be awarded each year during commencement, to the young woman and young man of the first year college class who have made the highest average grades in their class work during the freshman year. The final term average , for each subject taken as shown by records in the Dean’s office shall be used in computing the yearly average, which computations shall be made by a committee of the faculty appointed by the president of the Institution. In order to be eligible for either of these scholarships a student must be in attendance at the school throughout the freshman year and carry at least 14 credit hours work. It is understood that the winners of thee scholarships will use the money to help defray actual school expenses during the first or second asucceeding school year and to this end the money will be placed on deposit with the Bursar of the school and a certificate (good for $50.00 as stipulated herein) issue each of the winners. If for any reason the winner of a scholarship should not use same in the manner herein set forth, within one year after the award is made, then the money reverts to the treasury of the Alumni Association. The T.P.O. alumni association hereby pledges itself to make all necessary arrangements for the perpetuation and annual awarding of these scholarships. This the 25th day of April, 1927. Alumni Executive Council Bryce D. Stone, President Leonard Dunavin T.W. Kittrell Odell Cornwell Rebecca Johnston Elanor Haile Hazel Wall, Secretary Mr. Lane: --“Do you know what they call lemons in Sioux City? Dumb-bell Hix: --“No, what do they call them?” Mr. Lane: --“Lemons.” The meanest professor was the one who borrowed a knife from a student to sharpen his pencil and then marked him down a flunk. Alumni Banquet Plans are being made for the largest attendance at the Alumni Banquet on June 2 in the history of the association. A prize will be given to the College Class having the greatest percent of its membership present. Reservations are being made and every Alumnus within reach should make a special effort to attend this Banquet. Sophomore Class The Sophomores are glad to welcome the new students who are registered as second year college students into the class activities outside the classroom as well as in class work. The class is now working hard on the plans for the reception for the senior college students which will be given in the main building on the evening of May 13. The following committees have been appointed to plan the entertainment. Entertaining committee: Mr. Myers, Miss Scott and Miss Graham. Refreshment committee: Mr. Carmack, Mr. Whitefield, Miss McClarty and Miss Bilbrey. Decorating committee: Mr. Burrow, Miss Hennessee and Miss Windell. With these efficient committees as leaders there can be no doubt that the senior will be given an enjoyable reception. Flora Montgomery –Reporter Algood Grab Game from Reserves Coming from a 3 run lead to win in the 9th, Algood took a strange game from the Reserves by noising out by a 7 to 8 score Monday afternoon April 25, the game being played on their own pasture. That right-about-face ball game should never have been, the Reserves should have won it in the regular nine acts, 7 to 4, maby 7 to 5 or 6. As the second guessers would sum it up, the Algooders should never have been allowed to persecute Gates until the count was even tied, after he had been staed to a 3 run lead by Watson through the first 7 innings. Score by innings: Reserves 002 020 300-7 Algood 200 020 004-8 Upper Cumberland and Palladian Literary Sociteies The Upper Cumberland and Palladian Literary Societies met in the auditorium on Monday afternoon, April 25, for a joint program. A very delightful musical program with dramatic presentation of the following popular songs was rendered: “That’s a Good Girl” –Elsie Young and Agnes Greenwood, Chorus –Robert Smith “Mary Lou” –Lauren O’Dell and Agnes Greenwood, Chorus-Mary Ellen Rash. “I Never See Maggie Alone” –Robert Smith and Mary Ellen Rash. Chorus –Beulah Allison. “Sunday” –Robert Smith and Mary Ellen Rash. Chorus –Dannie Wright Jarvis. Declamations by Donald Moore and Elmo Willeford were also interesting features on the program, which was concluded by several numbers by the Upper Cumberland and Palladian Orchestra. These two societies extend a cordial invitation to all new students to visit their meetings at any time and assure each one a hearty welcome. Reserves Trim Celina A day in which all the characteristics of an ideal baseball day were lacking, did not keep the Tech Reserves and Celina apart, April 21. The Reserves administrated a 8 to 6 drebbing. A goodly number of errors were piled up on either side and it was somewhat of a tug-of-war affair to see which individual player could make the most errors. The Reserves did the greater part of their scoring while the game was young and the visitors brought up their end of the scoring largely in the latter part of the game. Score by innings: Celina 000 110 002—6 Reserves 303 110 000—8 Tech Wins 4 to 3 From Union Coach Overall’s baseball team won a close game from Union University April 20 with a score of 4 to 3. Moss started on the mound for the Eagles and pitches a good brand of ball until he was released by Summers in the 6th to save his arm. A feature of the game was three straight two-sackers hit by Winningham, K. Evans, and Nixon in the third inning which brought in two scores. Behind the almost air-tight pitching of Moss the Eagles grabbed off a lead and held it throughout the game. The game to be played the following day was canceled due to too great amount of moisture in the atmosphere. Score by innings: Union 100 010 100—3 Tech 102 000 100—4 Bethel Breaks Tech’s Line of Victories Lefty Summer’s string of victories came to an untimely and to a large extent, unjustifiable termination, Saturday afternoon April 30, at Bethel College, the Kentuckyans taking adcantage of a cross-eyed umpire and of some fielding remissness. The eagles were only able to get 3 hits off the Kentucky pill slinger. The play of both teams slumped in the fielding and off-color base running cut down the score to 2 to 1. There be those days when the best ball players go cross-eyed and so ‘tis with some umpires. Score by innings. Tech 000 000 100—1 Bethel 000 020 000—2 Jokes “How would you like to sign up with me for a life game?” said Arlie “I’m agreeable”, said Rebecca “where’s the diamond?” M. Foster: --“here’s where you missed Manganese.” Adelle Crowder: --“I don’t know Miss Manganese.” Jobe: --“I’m just debating whether to give you a book or a kiss. Which would you rather have?” Shiela: --“I can’t read.” Harry Burrow: --“How come you’re all wet?” Alenn Scott: --“I fell in a barrel of cider.” H.B.: --“Didja get hurt?” A.S.: --“No, it was soft cider.” Preacher: --“Have you heard the story about the wicked flea? Dumbbell: “Well?” Preacher: --“The wicked flee when no man pursueth.” Elderly Newsdealer: -“Evening Sun?” Small Boy: --“Evening, Sir.” Dean Smith: --“I’m a man of few words.” Mr. Lane: --“I know. I’m married too.” “He done me wrong,” wailed the algebra problem, as the freshman handed in his exam paper. Don’t buy thermometers now. They will be lower next winter. “This being good is too much trouble.” “Yeah, it’s too much like carrying life insurance; you have to die to get anything out of it.” “What an iinocent girl she is.” Yeah; it has taken her years to acquire that innocence.” “Twinkle, twinkle, cheap cigar, how I wonder what you are.”

1927 February 5

 Girls’ Basketball Tournament February 24, 25, 26,1927 T.P.I. vs. Castle Heights, Tuesday Night, Feb. 15 Societies prepare for debate Question: “Resolved, That Labor Unions as they exist, are on a whole beneficial to the American people.” The century-old labor question will again be brought into forensic prominence at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute this year when the representatives of the Sherwood and Upper Cumberland Literary Societies meet in the annual intersociety debate on April 8th. The question as submitted by the Sherwoods to the Upper Cumberlands on last Tuesday reads as follows: Resolved: That labor unions, as they now exist, are on the whole beneficial to the American people.” The Upper Cumberland Representatives will announce their choice of sides of the question on February 10th. The Sherwoods will be represented by Stanley Carr, of Livingston, and Leonard Crawford, of Baxter. While the Upper Cumberlands are basing their hopes for victory on Robert Smith, of Winchester, and Paul Moore of Cookeville, Route 6. A loving cup is offered the winning team by Womack Drug Co. The society winning the cup three years in succession retains it as a permanent trophy. Home Economics Club Organized The students of the Home Economics department met and organized a home Economics Club. The purpose of which is to further the development of this department at T.P.I. and affiliation with the State organization, so as to better the conditions and increase the efficiency of the work throughout the state. Regular meetings will be held under the supervision of Miss Rose and Miss Johnson. The officers elected were as follows: President: Rebecca Johnson Vice-President: Eleanor Haile Secretary: Mary Della Pointer Treasurer: Jonny Bilbrey Spring Quarter Opens Mar. 14, instead of Mar. 4 An error was made in the general catalogue of the school concerning the date of the opening of the spring quarter, which will be on March 14 and not on March 4 as printed in the catalogue. Some additional instructors will be added to the faculty and several new classes will be organized at that time. A large number of new students are expected both at the beginning of the spring quarter and the spring short term, which will be on April 26. “Be an Optimist” A Great Success On January 28th, at the City School Auditorium, the Sherwoods and Belles Lettres Literary Societies gave the Baker royalty play, “Be an Optimist.” In spite of the rainy weather, there was a large and appreciative audience present. The play is dedicated by the author to “everyone, everywhere who is considered a grouch.” The many complimentary statements received by the young people who were in the play made them feel that they had a done a splendid service in removing any tinge of grouchiness that may have existed in the minds of those present. They appreciate the many congratulations they have received on the manner in which the various parts were presented. The characters were as follows: Isaac Golditch: Leonard Crawford Beck, His Daughter: Alberta Cassety Jimmy Maynard: W.B. Murphy Mrs. Clinton: Lena Breeding Mike: Hollis Ours Ray Hudson: Harry Burrows Miss Hull: Edith Gentry Maggie: Vallie Huddleston Ethel Peabody: Hazel Swafford Spencer: Paul Tidwell Madame Goopher: Ruth Weaver Direcotrs, J.M. Hatfield and J.E. Lane; chairman of publicity and business arrangements, Lester King; costume committee, Treva Cooper, Maurine Quarles. Palladians Entertained One of the most delightful social events of the season was that participated in by the Palladian society at the home of Miss Shelia Officer. Miss Officer, assisted by Misses Rebecca Johnson, Eleanor Haile, Elise Young, and Jessie Barnes entertained the members of the Palladian society with a card party on Saturday, January 29th, from three to five o’clock. Both were progressive bridge and rook were played, with Miss Mary Francis Whitson winning the prize for highest score in bridge, and Miss Virginia Wilcox for the highest score in rook. Delicious refreshments were served at the close of the afternoon by the charming hostesses. The party was heartily enjoyed by all. Moon-light cabaret minstrel Sponsored by football letter men and directed by Mr. T.W. Kittrell. Practice begun last Monday night January 3lst, on the Moonlight Cabaret Minstrel that is being sponsored by the football letter men. This Minstrel is being given to raise money with which to give each letter man a nice sweater. If you like a dry, uninteresting play, don’t see this Minstrel; but if you have good sides that can stand lots of laughter, don't fail to be there. The Minstrel book is a 1926 edition and this guarantees a new set of jokes. We are very fortunate in securing a very able director in the person of Mr. T. W. Kittrell. Mr. Kittrell as everyone knows, has had much experience in directing plays and al— ways makes them a great success. The following characters make up the cast: Director: Mr. Kitrell Interlocutor: B.M. Carr Sam: Oyama Winningham Melancholy: Robert Smith Pete: Gradis Winningham Jolly: Sewell Brown Buck: Merrill Hughes Clarence: Stanley Carr We promise you a good time, and we believe that you will get your money’s worth. The date and the price of admission will be announced soon. Watch for them. Be present, enjoy yourself, and help a good cause. Burritt College Co-Eds defeated by Tech Girls The Burritt Highlanders went back to the hills the other night following a humiliating defeat handed them by the Eagle Co-Eds, 45 to 2 on the local gym floor. The Preps also contributed their part of the big Tech night by winning with as much ease from Celina. High School to the tune of 45 to 22. There was very little out of the ordinary about the game itself. Had the Highlanders played a little better or the Eagles played a little worse, it might have been an exciting game, but as it was, we can only say that it was one of those uninteresting runaways. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Burritt Thompson F. Northcutt A.P. Whitson F. Bell L. Whitson C. Simrell Hale G. Johnson Moore G. Drake Substitutes: Tech-Watson, Jared, M.F. Whitson, Whitaker, McCormick Burritt – Acuff Cumberland loses to Tech 28-18 Speed of Tech Co-eds make Cumberland Five Appear Slow. It was evident from the first few minutes of play that the visitors did not have a ghost of a chance, but the Co-Eds from Lebanon kept at it and gave the gallery something good to watch at different times during the struggle. They were obviously suffering from too much and too hard basketball squeezed into too few nights. The game was far different from the great runaway that the locals staged against Burritt College just a few nights before, but they had in their possession a decided margin on the score board all during the scrap. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Cumberland Thompson F. Whitlock A.P. Whitson F. Alexander L. Whitson C. Vaughn Moore G. Smartt Hale G. Stockton Substitutes: Tech-Watson. Second game McDonald F. Sedwell Moore F. Wendell Greenwood C. Davis Matheney G. Hahnan Rich G. Gates Substitutes: Tech-Robbins, Cobb. Dr. Crume Makes Talk in Chapel On Thursday morning, January 27th, Rev. Sam Edwards and Dr. T.C. Crume, who is conducting a revival at the Baptist church, were present at the chapel exercises. Dr. Crume made a splendid talk on“Making Good in Life," which was enjoyed very much by the students. We were indeed fortunate to have a man of Dr. Crume's ability to visit our school and to give us such an interesting talk. Valentine Party On Saturday evening, February 12th, the Belle Lettres and Sherwood Literary Societies will give their annual Valentine Party for the student body. Elaborate plans are being made for entertainment and each and every student is promised an evening full of pleasure. B. G. B. U. Takes Victory from Take One could travel many a mile in any direction from any given point without seeing a slower game than the one between Bowling Green Business University and Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Both teams labored under the handicap of it being a warm night, but it was, no doubt, Tech's night off. They would work the ball down the floor, through the scanty defense of the Businessmen and then miss a crip shot. The Eagles held the visitors very. Well during the first quarter but after that they simply couldn’t hit the hoops. They had all the breaks against them, too. Time and again the oval rolled around the loop, only to fall over the wrong side. Too, a number of personals were called on the locals and most of the free throws were made good by the visitors. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. B.G.B.U H. Evans F. Sledge Robbins F. Perisho Moss C. Williams Watson G. Weems Winningham G. Seale Substitutes: Tech – K. Evans (1), Jobe B.G.B.U. – Lewis, Stamper. Tech Preps Lose to Livigston The Livingston Academy basketball team defeated the Tech Preps 22 to 18, in the former gym, about a week ago. The Preps played ruggedly due to the lack of intensive practice. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Livingston Vaughn F. Stonecipher McDonald F. Speck Moore C. H.Hinds Matheney G. Bone Rich G. D. Hinds Substitutes: Tech – Cobbs, Robbins Prep Girls Trim Carthage Displaying the same team work that has featured their play all season, the Prep girls continued their winning pace by defeating Carthage High, 47 to 7. The Preps took the lead at the beginning of the game and were never checked. Good passing and excellent teamwork featured the victory for the locals. Thompson, Jared and A. P. Whitson almost shared equal on the offensive plays. Carthage fought hard during the entire game but went unrewarded. In fact the defense of the Preps was so good that they only shot at the goal three times during the first quarter. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Carthage Thompson F. Jenkins Jared F. Hughes A.P. Whitson C. Malone McCormick G. Armistead M.F. Whitson G. Webb Substitutes: Tech – Reagan, White, Starnes. Lebanon Five Beats T.P.I. Castle Heights ran roughshod over T.P.I. in their gym Saturday night, 35 to 14. The cadets took an early lead and at the end of the first half were leading 18 to 7. Burns for the winners, was the high scorer of the game. Robbins led the scoring for the Eagles. The line-up follows: Tech Pos. Heights H. Evans F. J. Martin Robbins F. T. Martin Moss C. Burns Watson G. Haley Winningham G. Dawson Substitutes: Tech – Vaughn, Cobb, K. Evans Castle Heights – Wood Algood Club The Algood boys and girls true to their home town tradition, form a band of united workers who loyally and faithfully enter into every duty that devolves upon them. This group of ten have organized into a club and elected as their officers the following. President: Jasper Harp Vice-President: Mary Della Pointer Secretary: Henry Mallory Treasurer: Odell Cornwell Senior College Class The Senior College Class were in charge of Chapel exercises Friday, January 21st. The program was planned to commemorate the life of one of the South’s greatest heroes, Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson. Because of a visiting minister, Rev. B. T. Watson, only one of the numbers was given, this being a splendid talk on the “The Life and Work on Jackson” by Mr. Benton Carr. Everyone expressed their appreciation by the splendid applause. College students have access to art collections Art loan collections valued at $100,000 for use in teaching art will be sent by the Carnegie Corporation of New York to 20 colleges in the United States and Canada. The collections consist of 1,800 reproductions in photograph and color facsimiles of the greatest works in architecture, sculpture, and painting; 50 original prints representing different processes and schools from the sixteenth century to the present; a set of textiles in 35 pieces illustrating materials and designs of different races and ages; and 200 books, many of which are rare volumes in French and German, as well as English, on the art of every period and people. Cabinets have been provided for the sets and a catalouge prepared giving a description of each piece in the collection. Seventeen colleges in the United States, representing 13 different States and 3 colleges in Canada, are the beneficiaries. All of them are smaller colleges without heavy endowments and located in places not easily accessible to metropolitan centers. Cooperative plan involves half-year alternations One semester each year for three years is spent in an industry as nearly allied as possible to their chosen line of work by students in the department of engineering at the College of the Pacific, Stockton, Calif. During the fifth year students remain continuously in college. This is said to be the only college west of the Mississippi following the co-operative plan of instruction, under which students are enabled, after the freshman year, to gain valuable first-hand experience in the work they expect to follow as a profession and at the same time to support themselves while attending college. College Friendship College friendship is a deep, quiet, enduring affection for our college association. It is affection arising from mutual esteem and good will. College friendship is essential to a successful college career, for the more friends we have in college, the more we get out of college life. It is the desire of every college student to become as popular as possible with his college friends. Popularity, being based upon friendship, depends upon the number and kind of friends we acquire. College life would be a drudgery if it were not for the friendship we establish. If knowledge was the only thing we could get at college, many students would drop out, or not even start to college that would otherwise graduate. Friendship when once established is hard to destroy. It is something you can not loose, nor can it be taken from you so long as there is mutual esteem and good will existing. A large part of our education comes through our college associates. By discussing a topic with one or more college friends we get their views, and thereby broaden our own conception. There are many ways in which we can develop friendship while in college. We can develop it by trying to appear pleasant at all times, regardless of the state of mind. Also by participating in athletics, musical clubs, dramatic clubs, college journalism, class social events, literary societies, alumni associations, and any other organization or function connected with college life. There are many religious organizations in which we may make friends, friends that are worthwhile. Friendship is one of the greatest acquirements during college life. While in college we make friends that will last throughout life. We meet the people that we will expect to help us in the time of need, and those to whom we will render aid. These are the people which we will always cherish. A student goes to college to acquire training in leadership which better enables him to render efficient service to society. Leadership is developed, principally through friendship, therefore the greater friendship is developed in an individual, the more service he is capable of rendering to society. There is nothing that will promote and increase a student’s love for his Alma Mater more than college friendship. It is not, necessarily, the college that holds a warm place in a college man's heart. It is the college friends, and sweet memories that composes the Alma Mater. There is nothing more satisfactory to an Alumnus than to relate the cherished memories of his college friends, and his Alma Mater. Many times positions are obtained through college friendship. A college graduate, when selecting some one to hold a responsible position, over which he has charge, will usually select an old college friend, because he has been tried, and he knows what his friend is capable of doing. The friendship of no one is more desirable than that of a college man, because he is to become a leader in society, a man among men, in the near future. Some of Tech’s Friends I take this means and opportunity of expressing the appreciation of the 1927 Eagle Staff to our friends who have purchased advertising space in “The Eagle.” They merit the patronage not only of our student body, but that of all friends of Tennessee Tech. Those who have reserved space to date are as follows: Williams &' Terry Bros, Jere Whitson Hardware Co, Maddux & Proffitt, Citizens Bank, Cookeville Motor Co., “33" Service Station, Murray Ball, Jewler, Womack Drug Co., Herald Publishing Co.. Gainesboro Telephone Co., Crawford Motor Co., First National Bank, Lassater & Carr, H. 8. H. West Side Drug Co., Royal Cafe, Jenkins & Darwin Bros, T. Robbins, Pressing Shop, Shanks Hotel, ]. A. Isbell, Ragland. Potter & C0., Cookeville Marble Works, Brown Shoe Shop, Apple's Place, Barnes & Clark., Ohero-Cola Bottling Co., Crawford 8: Bates Café, Sam Pendergrass Hardware Co., Coca-Cola Bottling Co, Model Laundry, T. P. I. Café, Clark Shoe Shop, Menzies Shoe Co., Baxter Seminary, Tennessee Central Railway, I. L. Loftis & Co.. The Harding Studio, Tech’s advertisers are “Tech’s, Friends.” Patronize your friends. B. M. CARR, Editor. Y.M.C.A The Y.M.C.A. met in regular meeting room Wednesday evening, January 26th, and enjoyed a most delightful program. Each man took part in the discussion with zeal. The program was as follows: School-days: Wallace Mitchell Childhood Friends: Robert Smith School-day: Wallace Mitchell College friends: Paul Moore Friends in Life: B.M. Carr There has been good attendance at the Y.M. meetings, but there are men in the “halls” who should be in the Y.M. Come next Wednesday evening and help us while we help you make the best of our time. Upper Cumberland Literary Society The Upper Cumberlands are working hard to win the Wilson Banner this year, and furthered their plans by electing Paul Moore and Robert Smith the debaters, to defend the Black and Gold, with Benton Carr and James Carlen as alternates. Both debaters are experienced debaters and the society is looking forward to a winning team. The play “Be An Optimist" given by the .Sherwood and Belles Lettres was enjoyed and appreciated by the Upper Cumberlands and we wish to congratulate the societies and more especially the cast for their splendid performance, and we hope to help further this program by presenting, with the assistance of our sister society, a play in March. Watch Oracle for announcements. Making the Assembly Hour Interesting There is one particular form of sport that seems to be especially attractive to the students in this college; it is that of cutting assembly. So pleasant is this diversion that dire threats and unpleasant publicity are called into use as a means of preventing such untoward behavior on the part of the students in general. I am wondering if in this case cure might not be better than prevention and may we not suggest that with a little forethought on the part of somebody in the planning of assembly programs they might be made so interesting that the enjoyment gained from being at assembly would overbalance that derived from being absent, thus taking from the precedent established by the school authorities. In other words, speaking in the language of the teaching profession, the work should be made so interesting that the students will want to get it instead of punishing them for not wanting to get it as it is. The student goes to assembly after two hours of intensive concentration on work requiring the greatest mental effort. Following assembly he again takes up work of the same nature for another two hours, before the time comes for any break in his work. Viewing it in this light would it not be wise to make the assembly period one more or less of a recreational nature, thus giving an opportunity for relaxation from the strain of the regular class work. Physiologists agree that inhaling fresh air is one of the best ways to refresh a tired mind or body; therefore the assembly room should be well ventilated, It should be the special duty of some one to see that this is taken care of. Singing is one of the best methods of getting this fresh air into our lungs and is a good form of exercise as well, and is also one of the best forms of relaxation. Hence would it not be a good idea to devote a greater part of the period to singing than has previously been done. There is nothing that any group enjoys more than peppy enthusiastic singing in which each one may take part. The assembly program should also be of an inspirational nature and after a few minutes of relaxation a well -planned devotional exercise would mean much to the student body; an exercise into which the one in charge had put some original thought bringing out something different from the subject-matter presented in the class room. This would mean of course that upon some one would devolve the responsibility of seeing that every assembly program was definitely provided for with a leader in charge and that leader notified in time to allow him time for special preparation, If the student does not feel that he is getting enough from the assembly programs at present to justify his attendance, he should feel some responsibility in improving them. The primary object of all clubs, societies and other organized groups on the campus should be to minister to the college life in general. What greater service could any organization render than that of presenting an assembly program that would give enjoyment and inspiration to the entire school? Let’s get busy with our special programs then, and with faculty and student body working together let’s make the assembly hour the most outstanding hour in the day. Why shouldn’t it be? It is the one hour when the entire college gets together. When this improvement has been accomplished we will no longer hear the low rumble of criticism that is now leveled against assembly by the student body in general and the monitors can throw away their little white cards and enjoy the hour with the others. – Chalk Line Agriculture Department From time to time articles will appear on subjects based on the study of Agriculture. This is the second of this series and from them we get an idea of many practical things studied in the Agricultural Department. Clean Milk and Pure Milk Milk may be clean and yet not be pure. To obtain clean milk the following precautions should be observed: First, to have a well ceiled .barn to prevent dust and other flying things from entering the milk While milking; second, to keep the barn well bedded with dry bedding; third, brush the cow and clean the udder with a damp cloth before milking; fourth, a thorough process of cleaning the vessels that are to contain the milk; fifth, to strain immediately after milking through a brass wire strainer of not more than fifty meshes to the inch and three or four thicknesses of loosely woven cotton or woolen cloth. The vessels that it is strained in should be closed well. As far as looks are concerned the above described milk would be alright for use, but it may not be pure These further precautions should be taken to make the milk pure: First, to test the cows for diseases; second, to wash the utensils with hot alkali water, and if possible expose to sunlight two or three hours; third, pasteurize to kill germs. This is done by heating to 155 degrees F. for fifteen minutes and quickly cooling to 50 degrees F. This will not develop a boiled taste. It should be of interest to the dormitory students to know that the milk supply for the lining hall comes from a source where the rules to obtain clean and pure milk are observed. Virginia Offers Extension Teaching In Citizenship Citizenship instruction, through single lectures or short courses, is announced by the University of Virginia Assistance in arranging citizenship institutes is also offered local communities or organizations by the bureau of citizenship education of the university, which will furnish information on any subject in the field of citizenship and government. A short-course meeting presents popular demand in connection with the proposed reorganization in Virginia of State and local governments, embraces a general study of city, county, and State government, and includes public health, education, public welfare, and other activities in which there is State and local co—operation. Lectures will be arranged to suit local convenience, the only expense being for travel and maintenance of the lecturer while absent from the university. Suggested Gifts for Brides Patent snore silencer and romance preserver. Dictograph for recording sleep mutterings. A self-reducer for household bills. Electric Searchlight for use in pocket larceny. Box of chalk for drawing the line. Rock crusher for biscuits. – Exchange. Letter Found by Janitor While Archie, the janitor, was cleaning the rooms at Springbrook during the holidays, he ran across a letter. It was addressed to Mr. Leonard Miller, and read as follows:“My Dearest Leonard: “I said I’d never come back, but here I am.” You know that ”I shouldn‘t mind if you find someone new.” “But I do, you know I do.” Leonard, “I'd climb the highest mountain,” if I knew I’d find you there “sitting on top of the world.” "All alone,” I’ll go where you go and do what you do, “as long as I have you." “So how come you do me like you do?" For ”I love you truly," Lew, and “I’m sorry I made you cry” “all through the night." “But what can I do after I say I’m sorry}? “Dear heart I’ll see you in my dreams,” and “Memories" of “The hours I spent with thee,” make me wonder“where my baby is tonight.” “Sweetheart,” “I wish you were jealous of me,” “as jealous as I am of you,”“Because" it makes me “Angry” to think that you may be “Cheatin’ On-Me,” “My Own” where we have “a cottage small by a waterfall,” “then I’ll be happy," and “at peace with the word.” “Honest and truly," “I love you dear,” “but if you love me I’ll never cry,” so Black-bird, By-Bye. Farewell to thee “Till we meet again.” Thy Own, “Little" Lucy. —The Broadcaster. “Why do people cheat on exams?” Because they hate to “flunk out.” That is such an illogical way of reasoning. A degree is a proof of a person’s having passed successfully certain subjects. If you receive a degree and are a hopeless ignoramus, you become a laughing stock. It is better to know nothing with no pretensions than to pretend knowledge that you do not possess. “Cheating on exams isn’t clever; it is dishonest. To steal another’s brain work is as dishonest as stealing his books. When a paper is handed in the pupil. Whose name is signed to it is swearing that the work is wholly his own. A pledge is superficial—a person who signs h 3 name has signed the best pledge he can. Giving help is as bad as receiving, if not worse. There is a double weight of dishonor on the giver—his own and that of the receiver, who could not cheat even if he wanted to without the giver. “Cheating on exams is the most cowardly of all thefts because it involves the most inordinate of all human instincts, personal pride. The cheaters want to get something for nothing. They hate to fail an exam, regardless of the fact that they have made no preparation, because they hate to make a low grade when their classmates make “A.” They are ashamed to make “F" because others will find out, but they aren’t ashamed to look over a student’s shoulder and “copy." These people can see only as far as their noses—they cannot see how momentary weakness leads to genuine dishonesty. College age is too late to cure the cheating disease. It is a mental habit that grows by leaps and bounds when endured. The Dean’s solution—to expel those who are caught cheating—is about the only course to be followed. It may not eliminate cheating, but it will help rid the school of cheaters. This measure that provides two chances .for an offender is both wise and lenient. Stressing the point may make the practice less common, and people may see the error of their ways and mend them accordingly."—The University Echo. FINALE The longest trail has somewhere its ending; The sweetest day has its twilight of gall, When the Star of our hopes into darkness descending Fades and leaves but the black and the pall. The longest river finds somewhere its ocean; The tallest peak finds somewhere the sky. The sublimes faith and a whole heart’s devotion In the ultimate crux may perish and die. The rarest of flowers has its day of decaying, When its gospel of Beauty no longer it flings To the breeze, and its wilted petals are saying: “We’re dead—but we want no angel wings!” ——Vadus Carmack Tote Fair There’s an awful lot of happiness In this old world I find, If we think well of other folks And treat ’em middlin’ kind. If we meet and everywhere, We do the best we can There's a heap of satisfaction In just “toting fair.” There’s a powerful lot of gladness In being true to men, In carryin’ out your promises Every time—and when They don’t seem to appreciate it— Why, don’t you never care, You’re more ahead than they are By just “toting fair.” There’s rules' and regulations For being happy here But honest, you don’t need them And don't you never fear— You’ll be happy and contented If you treat your neighbor square, For the best way to be happy Is to just “tote fair." ——George P. Kissberger. Formal Instruction for Deans of Women Special course for training advisers of girls and cleans of women have been established in at least 24 higher institutions in the United States, as shown by a survey conducted by the National Association of Deans of Women. Courses vary somewhat in the different institutions. In 10 institutions courses in relation to the high school only are available; in 6, courses in relation to higher educational institutions as well as to high schools are offered. In others the particular field of interest was not stated. The dean of women is the instructor in charge in nearly all the institutions, and replies from 19, indicate that credit of from one to six semester hours is granted. From 50 to 70 pupils a year receive scholarships from the Nicaraguan Government for education in foreign countries, principally in the United States. Jokes Mr. Parsons: “When was Rome built?” Flop Tallent: “At night." Mr. Passons: “Who told you that?” Flop: “You did. You said Rome wasn’t built in a day.” A bright—eyed, shabby little fellow was working his way thru a Crowded street car selling his papers. A white—haired old gentleman seemed interested in the boy, and questioned him about his way of living and his earnings. It appeared that there was a young brother to be supported. “Jimmie is lame and can’t earn much himself," said the boy. "Ah, I see," said the gentleman“That makes it hard. You could do better alone.” The shabby little figure was erect in an instant, and the denial was both prompt and indignant. “No I couldn’t," replied the boy. "Jim's someone to go home to. He’s lots of help. What would be the good of having luck if nobody Was glad? Or of getting things if there was nobody to divide with?” “Fourteenth street!" called the conductor, and as the newsboy jumped out into the gathering dusk, the old gentleman remarked to nobody in particular: “I've heard many a poorer sermon than that.” An absent-minded man was strap hanging in a tram car. He swayed to and fro and finally the conductor said to him, “Can I help you, sir?” "Yes," said the man, ”hold onto this strap while I get my fare out.” Mable Matheny: “Sometimes you appear so manly, and sometimes you are effeminate. How do you account for it?” Willis Huddleston: "I suppose it is heredity. Half of my ancestors were men, and the other half were women." Servant: “The doctor’s here, sir.” Absent-Minded Prof: “I can’t see him. Tell him I’m sick.” Clerk: “The customer asks if this shirt will shrink?” Ikey: “Does it fit him?” Clerk: “No, it’s a size too large.” Ikey: Sure, of course it shrinks.” How much did Philadelphia, Pa ? How much did Cleveland, O.? How many eggs could New Orleans, La? Whose grass did Joplin, Mo? What was it made Chicago, Ill.? Twas Washington, D. C? She would Tacoma, Wash, in spite of a Baltimore, M. D,? You call Minneapolis, Minn.? Why not Annapolis, Ann.? If you can't bet the reason why I bet Topeka, Kan? Who was it lent Nashville, Tenn, when he was nearly broke? Could Noah build a Little Rock, Ark., if-he had no Guthrie, Ok.? Would Denva, Colo. cop because Ottumwa. la., dore? For tho my Portland, Me., did love, I threw my Portland, Ore. “Is Johnny’s new dog a setter or a pointer?” “He’s neither. He’s an upsetter and a disappointment.” If we were asked what it is the most taxed thing in the world, our first guess would be – a mothers patience. “Oh, Ma, C’mere quick!” “What is it, Mary?” “Look, Johnny ate all the raisins off that sticky brown paper.” Do you discipline yourself as severely as you criticize others? Impatience causes as many failures as stupidity. An Englishman just returning to London from a visit over here, was very much impressed with our current slang phrase, “So's your old man," In telling his friends about his visit he said: ”They ’ave a very clevah saying over theya‘h jus’ now. When a man wishes to er— pun, so to speak, another friend. ’e simply says, “Your fawther is the same way. Haw, Haw! Clevah, isn’t it? Haw, Haw! A young minister, attracted by pretty Sister Grace, was dining with the family. Little Evelyn, aged 7, was talking rapidly when the minister was about to ask the blessing. So, turning to the child, he said in a tone of mild reproof, “Evelyn, I am about to ask grace.” Well, its about time," answered Evelyn. “We've been expecting you to ask her for a year and so has she.” High-School Alumni Aid worthy Students Student loan funds granted last year by the student benefit club, an activity of the Lansing (Mich) High School Alumni Association, enabled 13 girls and 8 boys to continue in school. A total of $2,250 was loaned to these 21 pupils. In the 15 years since the organization of the club 82 pupils have been aided. The principal of the fund now amounts to nearly $6,000. One per cent interest is charged until the pupil has been out of college one year, when it is expected that the loan will be repaid. Collegiate Study The Palladian's regular Monday afternoon program was made more interesting by a study of what other college’s are doing. Mary Francis ‘Whitson entertained the members with a charming selection "On Being Collegiate." ”Roommates" and the art of ”getting along” was brought out by Letha Capps. Sheila Officer gave the latest news on“Drinking and Dancing.” “Short Saying” in college life were given by Charlotte Watson. An instructive and much appreciated talk on "Being Young" was given by Muriel Gipson. Eleanor Haile concluded this snappy program by giving the very latest “Collegiate English.” Sherwood Society The Sherwood Literary Society met in the regular meeting room, January 24th, and rendered the following program: Devotional – Chaplain. Debate: Resolved, that Stonewall Jackson was a greater leader than Robert E. Lee. Affirmative, Henry Mallory; Negative, E. J. Wood. Oration –Roy Leonard. Several new men affiliated with the society. We are always glad to have new men come in and put their heart to the work and help us along. Our enrollment is increased at almost every meeting and we are continually climbing to higher things. If you are not affiliated with a society, we welcome you to ours, open heartedly. To establish 100 scholarships for rural teachers in summer schools of George Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tenn., the sum of $100,000 has been donated to the college.

1926-01-05

 THE TECH ORACLE TEAM AT HIWASSEE SATURDAY “Eagles” Battle “Teachers” To A Scoreless Tie The best and hardest fought football game since the Tech Milligan game of 1922, when Tech fought the highly touted Milligan “Buffaloes” to a scoreless tie, was the verdict given by everyone who saw the game on Friday, October 23rd, between the Tech “Golden Eagles and the “Teachers” from Middle Tennessee. The game was an exact replica of the Tech Milligan game, with both teams exhibiting a strong defense and neither having the punch to cross the goal. Coming up with a team ten pounds heavier to the man than the Tech clan, the Teachers expected to go away with a victory by at least three touchdowns, but instead they went away with exactly what they brought with them –nothing, they even lost something –a hope to avenge our last year’s victory at their expense. It was really a victory for Tech, because the Teachers with their heavier and more experienced team should have won, but the kicking of Hughes and Tech’s stubborn defense soon, had them to the wall, fighting desperately lest we should emerge the victor. After the first quarter, when the Teachers exhibited their greatest power, the ball was in enemy territory all the time, but Tech lacked the power of the punch to carry it over. The begin the game Winningham kicked off to the Teachers. The () kick was low and hard and the Teachers attempting to receive it fumbled, Winningham recovering, by means of short bucks and passes, Tech advanced the ball to the Teachers’ four-yard line. Here Tech lost the ball on downs and the Teachers kicked out of danger. Tech was again held for downs and McBride returned Hughes’ punt fifteen yards. From this point the Teachers, showing steady power at the line and with the help of a nice twenty-yard pass, advanced the ball to our ten-yard line. However, a pass, which Miles just barely missed getting, was incomplete and the ball went over. Tech kicked out of danger and from then on were always in enemy territory, at one time within fifteen yards of the goal where Hughes narrowly missed a drop kick from his thirty-yard line. The punting of Hughes and the deadly tackling of Wilson featured the game. Hughes averaged 32-yards to the Teacher’s 22, while Wilson’s tackling was the best seen on the local field since McKibbon, who is now playing with Vandy, came up with Morgan in 1921 and proved very, very irritating to the Tech men who were trying to advance the ball. For the Teacher’s Thronberry was exceptionally strong in the line till taken out in the last quarter because of grogginess. McBride was the backfield mainstay. The Teachers made eight first downs to our four, mostly in the first quarters, but as is often the case they did not extend far enough to cross the goal. They also completed eight passes to our four, but as all except one was very short, they went naught. Tech M.T.T.C. Watson L.E. Miles Brown L.T. Thronberry Moss L.G. Parks Clark C. Johnson Miller R.G. Ralston Wilson R.T. Presgrove Winningham R.E. Jones Hughes Q.B. Sneed Lewis L.H. McBride Starnes R.H. Freeman Jobe F.B. Hackman Substitutes: Tech: Davis for Winningham; Cooper for Davis for Brown; Winningham for Watson. M.T.T.C.: Fowler for Freeman: Thompson for Hackman; Huffines for Sneed; Fowler for McBride. Official: Referee Hughes; (Nashville); Umpire Carlen; Head Linesman Bryant, (Tech). WHERE ARE THE SENIOR OF ’25? Institute Graduates Smith Herbert Bracey is in Pompano, Florida, engaged in contracting work with his father. James P. Buck is principal of the school at Quebeck, Tenn. Benton Cantrell is principal of the high school at Clarkrange, Tenn. John M. Frazier is Principal of the Tasso High School, Tasso, Tenn. T.W. Kittrell is Bursar and Head of the Commercial department at T.P.I. DeWitt T. Puckett is teaching English and Mathematics in one of the branch schools of the Georgia Normal and industrial college in Bowdoin, Ga. High School Graduates The following are teaching this year: Jonnie Bilbrey, Oliver Bohanon, Beulah Buck, Gorda Carrington, Ona V. Ellis, Anna Ruth Grimes, Thelma High, Loraine Huddleston, Willie Hugens, Ellen Jared, Lecil McDonald, Dimple Knight, Eunice Minor, Lucy Whitson, Clara Joe, Bilbrey, Anna Lee Boles, Pasco () Tollison, Notie McCormick, Ludia Wheat. The following are in school: Charles Cox is at the University of Tennessee. Louise Gibson is in Virginia Intermont College, Bristol, Va. Dimple Greenwood is studying music in the New England Conservatory of Music, Boston, Mass. Helen Lansden is in school at Winter Haven, Fla., where she now lives. Mildred McDearman is studying in Alabama State Normal, Jacksonville, Ala. Vera Anderson, Beulah Clark, Mary B. Davis, Harry Lee Draper, Mamye Gibson, Elise Gregory, Pauline and Joseph Frank Hudgens, Leland Leonard, otto Masters, Rozelle Pendergrass, Amy Shipley, Rebecca Reagan, Ruth Van Hooser, Lucille Moore, Una Payne, and Emily Elsa Stanton are in T.P.I. again this year. Hassie Cole is employed by the DuPont rayon Company, Old Hickory, Tenn. Roy Leonard is connected with the Farm Bureau, Woodstock, III. Mrs. Lola Massa Smartt resides in Cleveland, Tenn., where her husband is psincipal of the Cleveland Grammar School. Ryman Robbins has a position in Detroit, Michigan. Fred Shipley is in Illinois. Alton Adams is in Nashville. Thomas Van Hooser has a position with the Citizens Bank in Cookeville. Ben J. Welch is in Florida. Charles L. Whitley is in Florida also, and has a position with the First National Bank, at Miami.

1925 November 5

 Freshman Number THE TECH ORACLE TECH BASKETEERS OPEN THE SEASON TECH WINS FROM WILD CATS 48-16 On Friday night, Dec. 12, the Monterey “Wildcats” came to our town, and left with the small end of a 48-16 count. The visitors were sorely outclassed, and were unable to score until the second quarter was well under way. The entire Tech team played well and with a little more training should be able to perform in excellent style. Clark at forward, and Alcorn at guard played their usual steady game, and the newcomers who showed good form were Blount, Jobe, Watson, Gipson Poteet, and Puckett. Blount was the high scorer of the game with 11 points, and Clark was second with 10. Jobe and Gipson were tied for third honors with 8 points each. Blount and Jobe played the floor in excellent style, while Alcorn showed his old form in guarding the basket. With these men, and those who will be added to the squad after the holidays, Coach Overall should be able to develop a very strong squad Among the newcomers to the squad Carr, a guard, from Livingston, looks to be the best bet. The lineups follow: Tech Monterey Blount (11) F Garrett (4) Clark (10) F Holloway (4) Winningham (6)C Hicks (4) Alcorn (4) G Ledbetter (4) Score by halves: Tech—27; 21: Total, 48. Monterey—6; 10 Total, 16. Substitutes: Tech—Jobe (8) for Winningham; Puckett for Alcorn; Gipson (8) for Clark; Poteet (4) for Blount; Blount for Gipson; Tardy for Alcorn; Smith for Blount; Masters for Poteet; McCulley for Winningham. Monterey –Romines for Garrett; Garrett for Hicks; Mitchell for Ledbetter. START BOOSTING THE TOURNAMENT FEB. 19, 20, 21 TECH DEFEATS BAXTER FIVE On Friday night, Jan. 9, Tech clashed with the strong Baxter Seminary quint, resulting in a 28-16 count, with Tech on the large end. The game was, on the whole, slow and marred by much roughness. The visitors received ten of the personal penalties, while 9 were chalked against Tech, Jobe was expunged via the foul route. The Seminary outfit presented a very strong defense, but very mediocre shooting by the Tech offense kept () the score to the low margin. All the Tech men missed many close shots, several of which should have been counters. They also failed to convert ten of the sixteen free throws which were offered them. The visitors converted four their twelve free shots. Tech held the lead throughout the entire fray, but the lead never was so commanding that Coach Overall would send the scrubs in. Watson and Judd were tied for scoring honors with 8 points each, and were easily the stars of their respective teams. Blount and Jobe played well for Tech, and Anderson and Swallows presented a stubborn defense to the Tech offense. The lineups: Tech Pos. Baxter Clark (c) (7) RF Boyd (5) Blount (4) LF Judd (8) Jobe (4) C Phillips (3) Watson (8) RG Anderson Pucket (1) LG Swallows Substitutions: Tech—Alcorn (2) for Puckett: Winningham for Jobe, Jobe for Clark; Poteet (2) for Jobe; Jobe for Blount; Blount for Poteet; Poteet for Winningham Puckett for Watson. Field goals –Clark 3, Blount 2, Watson 2, Jobe 2, Poteet 1, Alcorn 1, Philips 1, Judd 3, Boyd 2. Fouls –Clark 1 in 1, Blount 0 in 5, Jobe 0 in 2, Watson 4 in 5, Puckett 1 in 1, Alcorn 0 in 2, Judd 2 in 8, Boyd 1 in 2, Phillips 1 in 1, Swallows 0 in 1 Official –Clark, Referee Boys’ Schedule (Tentative) Jan. 19 –Lincoln Memorial here Jan. 23 –Normal, here Jan. 27 –Maryville, here Feb. 2 –Cumberland, here Feb. 9 –Castle Heights, here Feb. 16 –Castle Heights, there. Feb. 21 –S.P.U., here Feb. 25 –S.P.U., there Feb. 26 –Bethel, there Feb. 27 –Ogden there Feb. 28 –Bowling Green Business College, there FRESHMAN COLLEGE The Freshman College class held the first meeting of the Winter term Jan. 7, in the English room Wheeler Allen was elected manager of the boys’ basketball teams. Miss Vaughn serves as manager of the girls’ team. This class is at present the largest in school, there being 77 on the roll. The following students have joined the class this term: Nona Webb, Alice Elizabeth Tardy, Dena Langford, Marie McCoin, Margaret Peters, Reuben McCoin, Hellen Stonecpher, Stanley Carr, Irene Paschall, Benton Carr, Lester King, Gaskil Whitaker, Henry Chapman Hargis, Mary Tom Johnson, Wheeler Allen, Frank Loomis, Ethel Smith, and Percy Neely. FRESHMAN RESOLUTIONS Ban McDearman –Resolved always to sit on the front seat in McClanahan’s classes. Lee Sadler Darwin –Resolved not to go to Alabama “on business” this year. Fred Terry –Resolved not to put any more CS2 on dog. Jimmie Miller –Resolved not to go to Granville or Algood but to go to the dormitory instead. Bill Johnson –Resolved not to sit by Fred any more in Psychology. Lucile Lee—Resolved not to let Buff get out of my sight. Merrill Hughes –Resolved not to burn more than ten gallons of gas per week for the presiding elder. Dan Jarvis –Resolved not to cry when my sweetie sends a telegram that the bus has broken down. Bill Johnson –Resolved to quit grinning for 23 minutes. Alex Shipley –Resolved not to make love to any girl but Mary Frances McKay –Resolved not to flirt with more than a half dozen girls at the same time. Dale Lee –Resolved never to return to Hornbeak, Tenn. Katherine Hargis –Resolved to quit flirting. Eleanor Haile –Resolved to quit flirting. Frances Huffman –Resolved not to let Puckett go with any other girls. The Freshman Class –Resolved not to be any greener than nature intended us to be. COLLEGE FRIENDSHIPS In attempting to present a few thoughts on “College Friendships” there are at least four questions that readily come to mind: Just what do we mean by “College Friendships,” upon what do they depend. Where are they cultivated, and what is their value? In this article each shall be dealt with separately and in order. There are at least three different ways in which college friendship may be construed. First, most people are prone to consider college friendships as mere acquaintances, but this is not friendship in its truest sense. However, there () are, and should be many mere acquaintances formed in college, especially in large colleges. Others consider friendships as personal associations with fellow students. Many of you have had and will have many personal associates from whom you derived much lasting good, but we cannot call even this real friendship, even though the great majority of college friendships come under this class. The last class of friendships we will call true friendships. A true friend is your counselor when advice is needed. Bacon in his essay on Friendship has said: “The light that a man receiveth by counsel from another is drier and purer than that which cometh from his own understanding and judgement which is ever infused and drenched in his afflectations and customs. A true friend will share his comforts, his means, or anything he might possess if you are in need. College friendships depend to a great extent upon the class of the students in school. First of all there are the bashful and shy students, of which there are but a few. This bashful condition among students is usually due to one of two factors. Either they have no natural attraction or they are too obvious of self. They make very few friends or a sociates until they are made to forget their peculiar characteristics. And one of the best remedies is friendship. They should be befriended at once, especially if they are new students, because a friendless student is apt to get discouraged and will leave school at almost any opportunity. Second, there is the care-free, happy-go-lucky kind of student, who isn’t much of a student after all. He makes the poorest friends because he does not take things seriously enough to be of any real service as a friend. His association should be cultivated, however, for friendship’s sake, if for no other reason. Third, there is the amiable and sociable type of student who has personality and natural attraction; you see friendship written all over his being. This kind of student makes the most desirable and lasting friendships, and should, therefore be diligently sought after. College friendships may be cultivated in various school organizations and functions. A very important place where personal associations may be made is in the societies and fraternities. More lasting friendships are made in college fraternities than in possibly any other school organization. At present we do not have fraternities in Tennessee Tech; but with the advent in the near future of a four-year college course we will undoubtedly have fraternities to promote friendships and perpetuate college traditions. Other important places where friendships are wont to be made are the various college social functions. Chief among these may be mentioned parties and picnics. Personal associations may also be had in the class-room, where the constant intermingling should produce a closer relationship between each student. Lastly, personal associations and more especially true friendships may be cultivated among dormitory students. In dormitory life roommates are thrown together, and it is a natural consequence that more lasting friendships should be there formed. College friendships are of inestimable value not only during school days; but also in the after years. First of all friendships open the heart. Francis Bacon aptly expresses the thought as follows: “No receipt openeth the heart but a true friend; to whom you may impart griefs, joys, fears, suspicions, counsels, and whatever lieth upon the heart to oppress it.” Friendships help clear the understanding, on which we again quote Bacon: “Certain it is, that whosoever hath his mind fraught with many thought, his wits and understanding do clarify and break up in the communicating and discoursing with another: he tosseth his thoughts more easily; he marshalleth them more orderly, he seeth how they look when they are turned into words; finally, he waxeth wiser than himself, and that more by an hour’s discourse than by a day’s meditation.” Friendships broaden the student’s outlook on life. Some famous writer has said, among his other writings, “I am a part of all I have met” This expression may be very fittingly applied even to mere acquaintances, but with friends we have more than met –we have well met. Consequently, constant association with friends cannot fail to impress upon the student their ideals –what they are and what they are striving for. DOUGLAS ROBBINS HOW FRESHMEN SPEND THEIR TIME Annie Pearl Larkin –Primping Martha Sedivack –Chewing gum. Bill Johnson –Where Fred is. Frances Huffman –With Puckett. Douglas Robbins –Arguing. Merrill Hughes –At the presiding elder’s. Tommie VanHooser –In the restaurant. Count McKay –Writing love letters. Effie Wood –Don’t have any. Lester King –Chemistry lab Ban McDearman –Talking. Gaskil Whitaker –Filling up space. “Algood” Bunch –Together. Catherine Hargis –Flirting. Lucille Lee –Keeping up with Buff. H. A. XIV Girls –Gossiping. Buff LeFevre –Ringing the bell. Robley Jobe –Down the Sparta Pike. James Carlen –Cutting Chapel. Ed Huggens –Doing nothing. Ruby McKeel –Practicing basketball. Eleanor Haile –Serving on committees. Wheeler Allen –Studying Botany. Margaret Vaughan –Inventing a way to keep from studying Lillian Pointer –Singing. “Sis” Bracey –Grinning. Frank Loomis –Building dams. Jimmie Miller –Getting subscriptions for Tech Oracle. Lee Sadler Darwin –Going to Alabama. Nona Webb –Looking for a letter from Raymond. Mary Tom Johnson –Watching for a Ford roadster. CO-EDS LOSE TO M.T.N. SCORE 30-16 Saturday night the Tech Co-Eds were handed the smaller end of a 30-16 score, in the City Gym, at the hands of the Middle Tenn. “Normalities.” We were somewhat outclassed by the visitors, but this was the first college game in which several of our girls had ever participated, and on the whole we think that our girls made a very creditable showing. Had the goal shooting of our girls made a very creditable showing. Had the goal shooting of our girls been more accurate we should have had a much better count, for many of the easy tosses went to naught. The work of the guards was very good, and they broke up many of the visitor’s passes and held the score to a low count. For the visitors Miss Marshall, at center, was the outstanding star, scoring over half of her team’s points and also playing the floor well. Miss Pope, also played well, donating eleven points. Beasley, a former Tech girl, was kept at bay by excellent guarding by Moore. The visiting guards also played well. The lineup follows: M.T.N. Tech Pope (11) F Shipley (10) Beasley (3) F Vaughan Marshall (16) C Whitson (6) Jones G Haile Snell G Moore Substitutions : M.T.N –Gannaway for Marshall. Tech: McKeel for Haile; Shanks for Vaughan; Vaughan for Shanks; Haile for McKeel Referee, Overall Score by quarters; M.T.N. 1-13-11-6-30. Tech 6-0-6-4-16 TECH TOURNAMENT Feb 19, 20, 21. WANTED-A NAME! Tech has made remarkable progress in athletics during the past few years, but no one has suggested a name for the teams that have brought honor to the school by their prowess. We feel that the name should come from the student body, so we are giving each student an opportunity to suggest one name by filling out the blank below and placing it in the Oracle mail box in the office. All names must be turned in by Wednesday, January 21st. I wish to submit the following name for Tech Teams: T.P.I. TOURNAMENT BEST Feb. 19, 20, 21. YET THE TECH ORACLE Official Publications of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Printed by Herald Publishing Co. Entered at the Cookeville Post Office. Second class rate pending. STAFF Bryce D. Stone ’26 Editor-in-Chief Eleanor Haile ’27 Asst. Ed.-in-Chief Associate Editors: Dewitt T. Puckett ’25 Wit and Humor Shelia Officer ’29 Social Amy Shipley ’28 Class Hallie Ray ’25 Faculty John J. Bell ’26 Exchange Hendon Johnston ’26 Athletic Thos. L. Passons English Alex Shipley Poet Business Department: James D. Miller ’27 Business Manager Jack Morrison ’26 Assistant Subscription Rates $1.50 per year PUBLISHED SEMI-MONTHLY T.P.I. FOUR YEAR COLLEGE CLASS THE AIM Whether or not T.P.I. will become a four year college depends upon the student body. If the students will T.P.I. enough all of the Senior Class of ’25 will return and bring some one with them. The old saying is that “It pays to advertise,” and the best way to advertise is through the student body. The aim of the Class of ’27 is to make T.P.I. a four year college within a year or two. The class is determined to have its wish “Where there is a will, there is a way.” The approval of the faculty is necessary to make a movement of the student body a success. T.P.I. is as well equipped as the Normal schools, and has better equipment than many of the smaller colleges of the state. Having the equipment, why not have the students? It is up to every member of this class to do all he can to make this school the success it should be. Start the drive for new students today and do not stop until our ideal is realized. It seems that a majority of the High School Class of ’25 will be back next year. This year the Freshman Class has 77 members, the largest number in the history of the school. What is there that 77 high-spirited Freshmen can not do? Start the drive today! Let’s go, Freshmen! E.B. HUDGENS What’s a bride? A new broom, that hangs around the parlor for the first month, but spends the rest of its days in the kitchen. NEW STUDENTS ENTERTAINED On Thursday evening, January 8, the Sherwood and Belles Lettres Literary Societies gave a reception for the new students in the Auditorium. A very entertaining program, given by members of the two societies, was as follows: Welcome Address Dewitt Puckett Piano Solo Velma Murphy Declamation Alton B. Adams Aims of the Society Effie Wood Solo D.T. Puckett Popular Music Merrill Hughes Debate: Does marriage increase the happiness of the person married? Affirmative, Miss Clyde Jackson. Negative, Gilber H. Hatfield. Jokes… Alex B. Shipley The program was concluded by the serving of refreshments, after which a very delightful social hour was spent in playing Virginia reel and other games. The evening was pronounced a great success. Perhaps the high point of interest in the program was the debate. Discussing a question of wide popular appeal and utmost importance both speakers were at their best. Of course, experienced and competent judges could not be found in the societies but an effort was made to procure ones with open minds. However, the deep-founded convictions of the two near-bachelors could not be overcome, and the negative was awarded the decision by a vote of two to one. The Sherwoods and Belles Lettres wish again to express their sincere appreciation of the presence of so many new students. We wish them to understand that the societies are open to them the same as the oldest student in school. Our highest aim and desire is for the uplifting and inspiration of the individual and not for the glorification of the society as a whole. It is hoped that as a result of the impression received by the new students, they will be influenced to join one of the societies. We are not so egotistic as to hold out visionary claims incapable of realization, nor do we expect that all or even a large majority of the new students will affiliate with our societies, but if an interest in society work can be created and they can be influenced to join some society our aim will have been accomplished. SOCIAL AFFAIRS A crowd of the college boys and girls were entertained with a beautifully arranged dance given by Whitney White at his country home, Dec. 24. Music was furnished by the “Joyland Six.” At a late hour delicious refreshments were served. Forty guests enjoyed the occasion. HILL-DOWELL Miss Edna Dowell and Mr. Holmes Hill were married on January 1, at the home of the bride. The bride graduated from T.P.I. in the High School cass of 1923. She is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J.B. Dowell, and the groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Hill. They will reside with the groom’s parents. FRESHMAN FROLIC Combustible Bobby: “Do you know Fat Burns?” Bill: “No.” Bobby: “Well, it does.” A Novelty Dale: “I have an idea.” Lee Sadler: “Be good to it; it’s in a strange place.” Will She Turnip Her Nose? My Sweet Potat: Do you carrot at all for me? My heart beets for you. You are the apple of my eye. If we cantaloupe lettuce marry. We will be a happy pear. If Nevada wore Arizona’s New Jersey, what would Delaware? Alaska St. Peter (to applicant): “You say you were editor of the Tech Oracle?” Applicant: “Yes, sir.” St. Peter: “Take the elevator.” Applicant (stepping into elevator): “How soon does it go up?” St. Peter: “Up? It doesn’t go up; it goes down.” Hendon: “I have electricity in my hair.” James: “You ought to have. It is attached to a dry cell.” Mr. Passons: “What are the three words most commonly used in English?” Willie Hudgens: “I don’t know.” Mr. Passons: “Correct” Jimmy: “I see where three persons were killed in a feud yesterday.” Effie: “Those little cheap cars are dangerous.” Jobe: “I heard that Mr. Passons received compensation because of deafness caused while in the army.” McKay: “Huh. He can hear well enough in class.” James W. (loudly): “John T. Jr., come here and get this dog!” Y.W.C.A. We are exceedingly glad to have so many former members back with us this term. We are planning to make the work of the Y.W.C.A. a better success this year than ever before. There has been a number of new girls who have already become interested and expect to become members soon. The regular meeting was held in the parlor Wednesday, January 7, 1925, and the following program was given: Song All Prayer Catherine Hargis “Thou Shalt Love Thy Neighbor as Thyself” Clyde Jackson Music Johnnie Bilbrey Story Mildred McDearman Song All Benediction All The moving picture machine is now ready for use. The Y.M. and Y.W. have charge of it. There will be several educational pictures shown, starting in the near future. Only a small admission fee will be charged. We want to urge every student to come. Every one is invited to attend the vesper services which will be rendered in the Chapel of the Administration Building every Sunday afternoon at 5 o’clock. JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL The Junior High School class met Wednesday, Jan. 7, to elect officers for the present term. Suggestions were given to the class by former presidents for a better organized class. New members were welcomed and old ones received. We hope to improve under the leadership of the new president, Donald Ferrell. The other officers are: Vice-President, Arrie Bohannon; Secretary, Maurine Quarles, Treasurer, Hubert Davis; Critic, Willis Huddleston; Sergeants-at-arms, Jno. T. Berry, Agnes Greenwood; Reporter, N.E. Ensor. Palladians The first meeting of the Palladian Literary Society for the year 1925 was held Jan. 5. Election of to lead the black and gold for the officers took place. Those elected Winter term were: Catherine Hargis, President; Williard Johnson, Vice-President; Johnnie Bilbrey, Secretary; Lilian Pointer, Treasurer, and Anne Elizabeth Bracey, Critic. BELLES LETTRES The Belles Lettres met in the regular meeting room January 5, 1925. A very interesting program was rendered, which consisted of the following numbers; Roll Call –Answered with New Year resolutions. Welcome to New Students –Miss Myrtle Bullock The value of a Literary Society Lola Massey. A Pathetic Reading –Vallie Huddleston. Jokes –Ruth VanHooser. Miss Gladys Bohannon, a former member of the society, was present and made a very interesting talk. Plans were completed for the reception to be given Thursday evening, January 9, by the Belles Lettres and Sherwood Societies, in honor of the new students. The following committees were appointed: Refreshments, Beulah Clark, Maurine Quarles, Anna Montgomery. Decorations, Lucile Lee, Mabel Cassety. LOCALS Miss Mabel Womack, Class of ’24, who is now attending the Conservatory of Music at Boston, spent the holiday season with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. Womack. Robert and Edward Gibson, Classes of ’20 and ’21, came from University of Tennessee to spend the holidays at home. Glenn Sisk, son of Prof. T.K. Sisk, a former T.P.I. teacher visited in Cookeville during Christmas vacation. Miss Callie Marcom, College Class of ’24, was recently married to Mr. J.D. Anderson. Misses Lillian Young and Mary Cox, Class of ’22, who are studying in Nashville, were at home recently. Old students who have recently visited the school include Messrs. Cleburne Hatfield, Odessa Johnson, John Frazier, Leonard Dunavin; Misses Mabel Womack and Delia Gentry. Harry Jenkins, Gillem Maxwell, and Levi Cooper, former T.P.I. students at Vanderbilt spent the holidays in Cookeville. John and Nan Holladay were at home from Milligan College. We are glad to welcome Mr. McClanahan back as our instructor in Psychology.

1925-01-15

 THE TECH ORACLE “GOLDEN EAGLE” ADOPTED AS NAME FOR TECH TEAMS Name Adopted After a Heated Discussion at Meeting of Athletic Association As a result of he movement, begun some time ago by the Oracle, to secure an official name for Tech’s warriors, quite a number of names were submitted by students and others interested in the school. Al names were carefully considered by the committee appointed for the purpose, and two, the “Golden Eagles,” and “Mountaineers,” were selected as best by the committee and placed before the members of the Athletic Association for a vote. At the first meeting of the association it developed that some members were inclined to call for a vote on other names than those selected on other names than those selected by the committee. This action was permitted by those in charge of the election and two other names, “Mountain Eagle,” and “Lions,” were placed before the meaning. On the first ballot two names, Mountain Eagles and Lions were eliminated. Two other ballots were necessary, but on the final vote the name “Golden Eagle” was adopted by a count of 139 for and 18 against it. The vote left no doubt as to the choice of the majority of the members present, and those opposing the selection are now full supporting the choice of the majority of the members present, and those opposing the selection are now full supporting the choice of the majority. The name should give future teams something to aspire to, and an inspiration to greater accomplishments in the athletic world. GIRLS ROMP ON MARYVILLE On Wednesday night, Jan. 28 our Tech Lassies took the Maryville Co-eds into camp to the tune of 46-13. The Tech girls showed their superiority at the onset and we’re never in danger. Misses Shiple Vaughn and () Whitson ran wild on the offense but were unable to shadow the work of Haile Moore and McKeel on the defense. Miss Painter played the best game for Maryville. Misses Haile and Kellar were disqualified through the personal foul route. Lineups: Tech Pos. Maryville Shipley (17) F Painter (9) Vaughan (17) F Kellar (2) Whitson (12) C Kellar Haile G Heiskell Moore G Kessenger Subs: Tech –McKeel for Haile; Starnes for Whitson; Wheat for Moore; Dow for McKeel. Maryville –Hooper (2) for Painters Cooper for Kellar. Referee –Barnes. PREPS LOSE FIRST STARTS On Friday night, Feb. 6, the Preps played Livingston Academy in the local gym and were defeated 21-16. Poston was the individual star for Livingston, while Robbins and Massa played well for the Preps. Lineups: Preps. Pos. L.A. Hobbins F. Poston Matheny F. Stonecipher Whitley C. Mallory Massa G. Carson Johnston G. Parrott Referee –Clark. Lose to Monterey 37-14 On the following night the Monterey High School lads ran roughshod over the Preps on the former’s floor. Garrett and Hicks starred for the winners. The game was a bit rough, and the Preps were at a decided disadvantage because of the deficient lightning. COMIC OPERA TO BE GIVEN AT COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES “H.M.S. Pinaford” one of Gilbert and Sullivan’s Most Successful Operas H.M.S. Pinafore, a comic opera by W.S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan, will be given the latter part of the school year by Tech students under the direction of Miss Tennie Alma Stanton. Work has already been started on the score. Pinafore was first presented at Strand Theatre in Lodon May 25, 1978, and is one of the most successful of the series f Gilbert and Sullivan operas. It was performed 700 nights in London and in America no piece is ever remembered to have had such a reception. It is said to have been on the stage of four theatres at once in New York alone, for months together. Among the most popular and best known of the Gilbert and Sullivan operas are. The Mikado and H.M.S. Pinafore. The Mikado was given last year by Tech students with great success and with this experience the cast, which with a few exceptions is the same as in the Mikado, should be in line for good work in Pinafore. The opera will be sponsored by the Senior High School class. OVERTON COUNTY STUDENTS ORGANIZE The student from Overton county in Tennessee Tech met January 29th and organized an Overton County Club. The following officers elected: B.M. Carr, president; Herman Langford, vice-president; Verna Huddleston, Secretary; Beulah Milligan, and Stanley Carr, reporters. This club has for its purpose: First, to keep the activities of this institution before the young men, and young women of the home county, and the opportunities it offers them for training; second, to promote fellowshinp among the student body, and cooperate in everything that will aid in making a greater T.P.I. We are considering the matter of () drawing up a constitution and making the organization permanent, so that students coming in the future will have an opportunity of advertising the school in an organized capacity. This club will give the students an opportunity to meet together, get acquainted, and plan together things that are of vital concern to their home county, to the institution, and to themselves. The following students represent the county: Benton M. Carr, Stanley Carr, Roscoe Carr, Lelia Carr, Herman Langford, Verna Huddleston, Helen Stonecipher, Velma Murphy, Dana Langford, Ernest Stringfield. W.Q. Lowe, Buford Murphy, Gradis Winningham, Roy Carmack and Beulah Milligan. BOYS WIN FAST GAME FROM CASTLEHEIGHTS TEAM Heights Team Showa Unexpected Strength. Score 35-31 On Monday night, Feb. 9, the Tech boys defeated the strong Castle Heights team of Lebanon by a score of 35-31. This feat was not accomplished during the usual period of play, for when the time was up, there was a 25-25 score. An extra five minute period did not decide the contest for it was again deadlocked 29-29 and another period was necessary. This time Tech scored 6 points and held Heights to 2 counters, thus ending the fray 35-31. The game was a thriller throughout and the final result was always in doubt. Alcorn, Jobe and Winningham played best for Tech, while Selby and Jordan were best for Heights. The game was ably handled by Referee Chest, of the Nashville Ramblers, and the fans in turn showed their appreciation of the fast play. Lineups: Tech Pos. Heights Clark (6) F. Wilson (4) Blount (9) F. Selby (15) Jobe (9) C Jordan (8) Winningham (7) G Bristow Alcorn G Cook () Subs: Tech –Watson (2) for Winningham; Winningham for Jobe; Jobe for Winningham; Winningham for Watson; Poteet (2) for Winningham; Winningham for Jobe; Watson for Poteet; Poteet for Clark. Heights: Smith for Bristow; McCracken (3) for Wilson; Gordon (1) for Selby; Gordon; McCracken for Wilson Referee –Chest. BOYS LOSE HARD GAME TO CUMBERLAND, 28-25 On Thursday, Feb. 5, our boys were forced to take the sting of a 28-25 defeat at the hands of the Cumberland “Bulldogs.” The game was hard fought and the lead was exchanged several times. Miller and Moore were stars for Cumberland while Blount and Alcorn starred for Tech. Miller is the best long-distance shot seen on the local floor this season. Lineups: Tech Pos. Cumb. Clark (c) F Miller (c) Blount F Moore Jobe C Elam Watson G Murray Alcorn G Irwin Subs: Tech—Winningham for Watson; Watson for Clark Referee—Delon SAM RICKMAN DIES AT HIS HOME IN HARTSVILLE, TENNESSEE Former Tech Student Succumbs to an Attack of Pneumonia After a Short Illness A wave of gloom swept over the student body last week when the news came of the untimely death of one who was near and dear to the hearts of all old Tech students, Sam Rackman died at his home in Hartsville, Tennessee on February fourth, after an illness of only a few days. The sudden death of “Big Rick,” as he was known to the student body, brought to a close the brief career of one of Tech’s best loved students. His record here is one worthy of commendation. Sam was one of Tech’s greatest football heroes. He played full back in 1921-22 captaining the team in 1922. His ability and clean sportsmanship won him the admiration and respect of all with whom he came in contac.t he was regarded as one of the greatest football players in the state. Sam was also a member of the basketball and baseball squads of 1922. His record of achievements does not stop here. He manifested a great interest in all school activities, being president of the Upper Cumberland Literary Society in 1922. Sam’s admirable disposition won for him many warm friends. His impressive personality and gentlemanly qualities made him a leader of his fellows, and his will always be a sacred memory to us. RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT Whereas, God in his infinite Wisdom has seen fit to call from earth our beloved teammate, schoolmate, companion, and friend, Sam Rickman; and Whereas, he was he’d in high esteem by us all; and Whereas, We deem it fitting and proper that we should give expression to our love and affection for him in the form of a resolution; Therefore, be it resolved: 1. That we, the members of the T Club of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, desire to express earnestly and sincerely our genuine appreciation and love for Sam. 2. That we esteem his loss a great loss to each and every one whose privilege it was to know him personally. 3. That this organization has lost in him an enthusiastic supporter and advocate of clean athletics, a clean sport, and a loyal and true Christian gentleness. 4. That as his schoolmates, we are grieved beyond expression at his untimely departure. Be it Further Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to his mother, a copy to the press, and a copy to the Athletic Council of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, the members of which join us in pronouncing these resolutions. L.B. LeFevre Chairman Catherine Hargis Rose Dow. Com Co-eds Defeat Cumberland On Friday night, Jan. 30, the Tech Co-eds defeated Cumberland University in the local gym to the tune of 18-14. The game was close and interesting throughout, and the result was doubtful until the final whistle blew. Misses Whitson and Shipley played best for Tech, while Miss Ayers was best for Cumberland. Lineups: Tech Pos. Cumb. Shipley (6) F Ayers (6) Vaughan (7) F Wesson (6) Whitson (8) C Hamilton (2) McKeel G Donnell Moore G Vaughn Subs : Tech-Haile for McKeel C.U. –Smartt for Donnell. Referee –Balcomb. Lose to Peabody 44-15 The girls lost a heart-breaking game to Peabody College Tuesday, Feb. 3, in the local gym. For Peabody Miss Burns, substitute for Britton, played a stellar game, with Miss Perkerson also playing well Miss Moore was the only Tech girl to reach anything like the expected form. Lineups: Tech Pos. Peabody. Shipley (4) F Perkerson (17) Vaughan (3) F Elliott (7) Waitson (8) C Britton Moore G Crowley McKeel G Dean Subs: Tech –Haile for McKeel, McKeel for Haile. Peabody –Burns (20) for Britton. SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL CLASS The Senior High School class met and elected members of class to serve on staff for Senior edition of Tech Oracle to be published during commencement. The following members were elected: Editor-in Chief –James Berry Assistant Editor-in-Chief –Alva Starnes Wit and Humor Editor –Henrietta Jared Social Editor –Rozelle Pendergrass Business Manager –Harry Draper Assistant Manager –Harold Blount Class Historian –Beulah Cleric Class Poet –Rymond Robbins Class Prophet –Elise Gregory. Mascot –Elizabeth Hargis. The Senior class is doing “best” in basketball. Blount is a star player on the varsity and Robbins and Massa play on the Prep team. Every season the Senior class does its part in putting out good players for all sports. When you want to see “pep” look for a Senior. SHERWOODS The Sherwoods have selected as their representative in the annual intersociety debate with the Upper Cumberlands, Mr. Dewitt T. Puckett and Mr. J.B. Cantrell. Herman Langford and James P. Buck were selected as alternates. These men, in collaboration with the sponsor of our society, Mr. J.M. Hatfield, selected and presented to the debaters of the opposing team the following question: “Resolved, That the Muscle Shouls power plant should be leased to a private interest.” The question is one of great economic importance and immediate popular interest. This is in keeping with our policy of selecting questions of an educational nature, which may be of lasting benefit to those concerned in the actual preparation, as well as those who may hear the speeches delivered. The debate will be staged about the middle of April and much interest and rivalry is anticipated. DANCE FOR VISITING TEAM A number of school girls and boys were delightfully entertained on Thursday evening, Feb. 5, when Miss Mildred Darwin gave an after game dance for the Cumberland basketball team at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Claude Darwin on Dixie avenue. Music was furnished by Hughes’ Joyland Six Orchestra. Tutti-frutti frappe was served throughout the evening and dancing hours were from 10 to 12. Margaret Vaughan: “Mr. Barnes, I spilled some acid on my foot and it surely made it smart.” Mr. B.: “Why not drink some then?” When you have nothing to say say it with silence. KUM! Don’t forget to come to the “Y” Tea Room for your lunch. It is open daily from 12 until 1. THE TECH ORACLE Official Publications of the Students of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Printed by Herald Publishing Co. Enter at the Cookeville Poet Office Second class rate pending. STAFF Bryce D. Stone ’26 Editor-in-chief Eleanor Haile ’27 Asst. Ed.-in-Chief Associate Editors: Dewitt T. Puckett ’25 Wit and Humor Shelia Officer ’29 Social Amy Shipley ’28 Class Hallie Ray ’25 Faculty Hendon Johnston ’26 Athletic Thos. L. Passons English Alex Shipley Poet Business Departments: James D. Miller ’27 Business Manager Jack Morri