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Description
Date

Letter to the editor page 2 of the April 26, 1968 issue of The Oracle student newspaper expressing disapproval that Tennessee Tech University flown the United States flag at half-mast in honor of the murder of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

1968-04-26

Clipping from page 2 of the May 28, 1965 issue of The Oracle student newspaper on law enforcement's unjust entry into the home of Tennessee Tech University international students.

1965-05-28

Letter to the editor from page 2 of the April 12, 1968 issue of The Oracle student newspaper on a graduate assistant instructor's response to freshmen students at Tennessee Tech University expressing racism and hate over the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

1968-04-12

Letter to the editor from pages 2 and 3 of the April 19, 1968 issue of The Oracle student newspaper on students cutting down the United States flag that was lowered by Tennessee Tech University administration in recognition of the murder of Martin Luther King, Jr.

1968-04-19

Letter to the editor from page 2 of the April 12, 1968 issue of The Oracle student newspaper on the aftermath of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

1968-04-12

Clipping from page 4 of the April 12, 1968 issue of The Oracle student newspaper on the Rev. Beverly Asbury's presentation on civil rights for Public Programs at Tennessee Tech University.

1968-04-12

Letter to the editor from page 2 of the May 2, 1968 issue of The Oracle student newspaper about criticism of the planned creation of a private student loan to honor Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by members of the Tennessee Tech University community.

1968-05-02

Main poster for the "What Affects One Group Affects All of Us": Black Student Activism at Tennessee Tech exhibit installed in the Office of Multicultural Affair's exhibit case on the second floor of the Roaden University Center on February 1, 2021.

2021-02-01

Records of the "What Affects One Group Affects All of Us": Black Student Activism at Tennessee Tech exhibit installed in the Office of Multicultural Affair's exhibit case on the second floor of the Roaden University Center on February 1, 2021.

2021-02-01

Letters to the editor from page 2 of the April 19, 1968 issue of The Oracle student newspaper on Tennessee Tech University students's response to the murder of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rev. Beverly Asbury's Public Programs presentation.

1968-04-19

Clipping from page 2 of the May 17, 1968 issue of The Oracle student newspaper of letters to the editor criticizing Tennessee Tech University community members's memorialization of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

1968-05-17

Letter from Tennessee Tech University alumni Nelia J. Kimbrough, Calvin Kimbrough, David E. McIntyre, and Patricia McIntyre to the editor of The Oracle student newspaper in response to Tennessee Tech men's tennis coach Larry Ware's abandonment of David Brents, a Black tennis player, in Johnson City, Tennessee, and the activism of and backlash against Tennessee Tech Black athletes. Included with the letter is a clipping from The Atlanta Constitution.

1973-04-19

Letter to the editor from page 2 of the November 13, 1992 issue of The Oracle student newspaper on an unknown person's racist vandalism of the Tennessee Tech University Black Student Organization's homecoming sidewalk art.

1992-11-13

Clipping from page 2 of the January 17, 1975 issue of The Oracle student newspaper. The clipping consists of a letter to the editor about a Tennessee Tech University honor society refusing membership to a white student because she associated with Black students.

1975-01-17

Clipping from page 6 of the October 17, 1969 issue of The Oracle student newspaper on Rev. Woodie White's lecture at the Tennessee Tech University Wesley Foundation.

1969-10-17

Clipping from page 2 of the April 10, 1970 issue of The Oracle student newspaper on housing discrimination against Black students in Putnam County, Tennessee.

1970-04-10

Letter to the editor by members of the Tennessee Tech University Omega Psi Phi Interest Group published in the February 24, 1978 issue of The Oracle student newspaper. The letter defends the group against a previous article's implication that they caused damage to the University Center. The letter points out the newspaper's discrimination against positive coverage of the group and its members.

1978-02-24

Clipping from page 2 of the February 16, 1973 issue of The Oracle student newspaper.

1973-02-16

Panels for the "What Affects One Group Affects All of Us": Black Student Activism at Tennessee Tech exhibit installed in the Office of Multicultural Affair's exhibit case on the second floor of the Roaden University Center on February 1, 2021.

2021-02-01

Page 111 from the Eagle yearbook for 1973-1974. on Tennessee Tech University men's tennis coach Larry Ware's abandonment of David Brents, a Black tennis player, in Johnson City, Tennessee, and the activism of and backlash against Tennessee Tech Black athletes in response.

1974

Clipping from page 3 of the February 3, 1978 issue of The Oracle student newspaper on Ed Osborne's speech on the needs of Black students at a Tennessee Tech University Luncheon Forum.

1978-02-03

Letter to the editor from page 2 of the February 18, 1972 issue of The Oracle student newspaper.

1972-02-18

Photograph of David Brents, a Tennessee Tech University Black student athlete, standing at the President's Luncheon Forum. Jeff Axel spoke about tennis Coach Larry Ware's abandonment of Brents in Johnson City, Tennessee, and other instances of racial discrimination at the Forum.

1973-04-16

Pages 3-5 from the Tennessee Tech University Communication/Journalism Program's biannual Eagle Eye magazine. The article discusses Corinne Johnson's experiences growing up and starting college as an African American in Chicago, Illinois, and visiting Memphis, Tennessee; what Chicago was like during the 1960s; her work in the Office of Multicultural Affairs at Tennessee Tech; the racism that underrepresented students face on campus at Tech; and the current racial climate in the United States. The article includes three photographs of Johnson and one photograph of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

2020-12

Photograph of Jeffrey Axel, a Tennessee Tech University Black student athlete, standing behind a lectern and leaning over to pick up a sports brochure. Axel called out men's tennis Coach Larry Ware’s racist treatment of David Brents, the university’s lack of recognition of Black athletes’ abilities, underrepresentation of Black athletes in publicity materials, and racism in the “T” Club for varsity student athletes.

1973-04-16

Photograph of Jeffrey Axel, a Tennessee Tech University Black student athlete, standing behind a lectern and speaking at the President's Luncheon Forum. Axel called out men's tennis Coach Larry Ware’s racist treatment of David Brents, the university’s lack of recognition of Black athletes’ abilities, underrepresentation of Black athletes in publicity materials, and racism in the “T” Club for varsity student athletes.

1973-04-16

Photograph of Jeffrey Axel, a Tennessee Tech University Black student athlete, standing behind a lecturn and speaking at the President's Luncheon Forum. Axel is holding a brochure for the men's track and field team. Axel called out men's tennis Coach Larry Ware’s racist treatment of David Brents, the university’s lack of recognition of Black athletes’ abilities, underrepresentation of Black athletes in publicity materials, and racism in the “T” Club for varsity student athletes.

1973-04-16

Photograph of Jeffrey Axel, a Tennessee Tech University Black student athlete, standing behind a lectern and speaking at the President's Luncheon Forum. Axel called out men's tennis Coach Larry Ware’s racist treatment of David Brents, the university’s lack of recognition of Black athletes’ abilities, underrepresentation of Black athletes in publicity materials, and racism in the “T” Club for varsity student athletes.

1973-04-16

Photograph of Jeffrey Axel, a Tennessee Tech University Black student athlete, standing behind a lectern and speaking at the President's Luncheon Forum. Axel is holding and looking at a brochure for the men's track and field team. Axel called out men's tennis Coach Larry Ware’s racist treatment of David Brents, the university’s lack of recognition of Black athletes’ abilities, underrepresentation of Black athletes in publicity materials, and racism in the “T” Club for varsity student athletes.

1973-04-16

Photograph of Jeffrey Axel, a Tennessee Tech University Black student athlete, standing behind a lectern and speaking at the President's Luncheon Forum. Axel called out men's tennis Coach Larry Ware’s racist treatment of David Brents, the university’s lack of recognition of Black athletes’ abilities, underrepresentation of Black athletes in publicity materials, and racism in the “T” Club for varsity student athletes.

1973-04-16

Photograph of Jeffrey Axel, a Tennessee Tech University Black student athlete, standing behind a lectern and speaking at the President's Luncheon Forum. Axel is holding and pointing at a brochure for the men's track and field team. Axel called out men's tennis Coach Larry Ware’s racist treatment of David Brents, the university’s lack of recognition of Black athletes’ abilities, underrepresentation of Black athletes in publicity materials, and racism in the “T” Club for varsity student athletes.

1973-04-16

Photograph of Jeffrey Axel, a Tennessee Tech University Black student athlete, standing behind a lectern and speaking at the President's Luncheon Forum. Axel called out men's tennis Coach Larry Ware’s racist treatment of David Brents, the university’s lack of recognition of Black athletes’ abilities, underrepresentation of Black athletes in publicity materials, and racism in the “T” Club for varsity student athletes.

1973-04-16

Clipping from page 2 of the April 27, 1973 issue of The Oracle student newspaper. The clipping is a letter to the editor in response to Tennessee Tech University men's tennis coach Larry Ware's abandonment of David Brents, a Black tennis player, in Johnson City, Tennessee, and the activism of and backlash against Tennessee Tech Black athletes.

1973-04-27

Page 125 from the Eagle yearbook for 1973-1974 on Tennessee Tech University men's tennis coach Larry Ware's abandonment of David Brents, a Black tennis player, in Johnson City, Tennessee, and the activism of Tennessee Tech Black athletes in response.

1974

Clipping from page 3 of the April 27, 1973 issue of The Oracle student newspaper on Tennessee Tech University football coach Don Wade's and track coach Bob Noyes's decisions to dismiss Black athletes who refused to practice in response to Ware's abandonment of David Brents, a Black tennis player, in Johnson City, Tennessee.

1973-04-27

Clipping from page 1 of the April 27, 1973 issue of The Oracle student newspaper on Tennessee Tech University men's tennis coach Larry Ware's abandonment of David Brents, a Black tennis player, in Johnson City, Tennessee, and the activism of and backlash against Tennessee Tech Black athletes in response.

1973-04-27

Audio recording of an interview of Wentford Gaines by Jerone Dudley conducted over Zoom for the Black Cultural Center Oral History Project. The recording duration is 59 minutes, 55 seconds. Gaines was born on February 4, 1953. He attended Tennessee Tech in the spring quarter of 1973. The football coaches recruited Gaines to play football at Tech. Gaines and other Black student athletes were dismissed from the team for refusing to practice after Tennis Coach Larry Ware abandoned David Brents, a Black tennis player in Johnson City, Tennessee. Gaines describes growing up as a Black child in a single-parent household in Anderson, South Carolina; his time attending and playing football at Ferrum College in Virginia; being recruited to Tennessee Tech; the broken promises, racism, and isolation he faced at Tennessee Tech and in Cookeville; and his life after transferring from Tech. Gaines details going to the University of Cincinnati, his time playing in the National Football League (NFL), living in Texas and New Jersey, teaching and coaching in Jersey City, teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic, playing athletics in high school, his sons’s athletic and academic experiences. Gaines describes the isolation of being Black in Cookeville, the lack of interaction between non-local Black students and the Black community in Cookeville, and how he only felt comfortable going out to one bar (likely John’s Place) in the area and otherwise went to Nashville to socialize. Dudley makes comparisons between his experiences and Gaines’s experiences in Cookeville. For a transcript of the interview, see item BCCOH_Gaines_20201127_transcript.

2020-11-27

27 page transcript of an interview of Wentford Gaines by Jerone Dudley conducted over Zoom for the Black Cultural Center Oral History Project. Gaines was born on February 4, 1953. He attended Tennessee Tech in the spring quarter of 1973. The football coaches recruited Gaines to play football at Tech. Gaines and other Black student athletes were dismissed from the team for refusing to practice after Tennis Coach Larry Ware abandoned David Brents, a Black tennis player in Johnson City, Tennessee. Gaines describes growing up as a Black child in a single-parent household in Anderson, South Carolina; his time attending and playing football at Ferrum College in Virginia; being recruited to Tennessee Tech; the broken promises, racism, and isolation he faced at Tennessee Tech and in Cookeville; and his life after transferring from Tech. Gaines details going to the University of Cincinnati, his time playing in the National Football League (NFL), living in Texas and New Jersey, teaching and coaching in Jersey City, teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic, playing athletics in high school, his sons’s athletic and academic experiences. Gaines describes the isolation of being Black in Cookeville, the lack of interaction between non-local Black students and the Black community in Cookeville, and how he only felt comfortable going out to one bar (likely John’s Place) in the area and otherwise went to Nashville to socialize. Dudley makes comparisons between his experiences and Gaines’s experiences in Cookeville. For the audio recording of the interview, see item BCCOH_Gaines_20201127.

2020-12-02

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