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 TECH ORACLE Q.M. SMITH, Unanimously Reelected President of Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Election Good for Three Years. Q.M. Smith has been elected to succeed himself as President of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Mr. Smith has served this institution well in the capacity of President, and we predict a continued growth and development of this great institution of learning. The institution has a record breaking summer school this year, having broken all former records of enrollment. A new feature next year at this school will be an addition all year of college which will make T.P.I. a three year instead of a two year college as heretofore. This will be followed by the fourth year as soon as practical and well afford an opportunity to the old students who have had only two years college to re-enter and complete college. Already we have heard of a number was thought their school days over at T.P.I. but on account of this additional year are coming back next year. Tenn-Tech is fast becoming a leading of the state. PARENT-TEACHERS GIVE PROGRAM The Student body enjoyed a most pleasant program rendered by the Parent-Teacher’s Association June 19, in the T.P.I. auditorium. Mrs. Watson of Washington, D.C, the National Secretary and Mrs. Haile of Memphis, the State President, gave interesting talks on the organization and presented many helpful ideas on organizing the rural communities. Mrs. Oliver, Chairman of the Fourth Congressional District and Mrs. Barbour, President of the local organization, were prestnt. Mrs. Lucas a noted pianist, played two very interesting pieces, after which the house was opened to discussion in regard to work in different communities. Then a delightful luncheon was served by the home economics class. At 1:00 they again assembled and engaged in community singing, which was followed by addresses from Mr. Q.M. Smith, Mr. McClannahan, Mr. Overall, Miss Jobe, Mrs. Eperson, and Mr. Gipson. By special request, Mrs. Lucas again rendered some numbers which were very entertaining. The house was opened for questions and several questions of particular interesting were answered by Mrs. Watson. This was followed by short farewell addresses by Mrs. Watson and Mrs. Haile. Pickett County Club Pickett county is represented this summer in T.P.I. by five teachers, as follows:; J.D. Cargyle, alias Judge Casey, Dimmer or Crookey. He is thirty four years of age, and has spent about fifteen in the school room. Mr. Cargyle lives three miles north of Byrdstown on the Byrdstown Albany pike. He is married and is the father of four children which he supports by teaching, farming and acting as county register. When he is not busy with these various tasks he will be found in summer school at T.P.I. Mr. Cargyle is located () for the next school year at the Green Briar School in Pickett county. Houston Huddleston is twenty eight years old and has been teaching since 1924. Mr. Huddleston has not been successful in the field of matrimony as Mr. Cargile, but hopes to be in the near future. He divides his time with teaching, farming and attending summer school. He lives three miles West of Byrdstown on the Livingston pike. Mr. Huddlesston will teach this year at Bethsada on the Overton and Pickett county line. Ben Elder is twenty two years old single and expects to stay that way. Ben has taught school two years. He will not teach this year due to the fact that he has no certificate. Mr. Elder is a quiet home loving boy and divides his time between reciting in the morning and singing “Home, Sweet Home” in the afternoon. He will be found in the Pickett county high school for the year of 1924-45. George C. Bertram is twenty-one years of age and the Old Bachelor of the delegation. He has taught only one year and expects to teach only one more. Then he intends to pack his belongings in a knapsack and take his dog and gun and spend the rest of his life hunting and trapping in the mountains of eastern Pickett county. Mr. Bertram will teach at Bloomington school in Pickett county. Last but not least comes Mr. Gid L Hassler, who is only nineteen years young. He has only taught one school. Through no fault of his he still single. Mr. Hassler is the ladies’ man of the Pickett county delegation. By the end of the first week of school he knew every girl in school by her first name. He never has less than two love affairs on his heart and worse than ever insists on telling them to his room mate. Mr. Hassler is the principal of the Love Lady elementary school for 1924-5. Some people think of Pickett county as a place where the old fashioned backwoods-mountaineer spends his time hunting, fishing, and making moonshine. Whether or not this is true there are many other things to know about this small mountain county. Ninety per cent of the teachers of Pickett county belong to the State Teachers’ Association. It has a first class High School. Byrdstown the county seat, is connected with Livingston and also Clinton county, Kr., by a hard road. Plans are being made to build a road to the Fentress county lines. We may not be as far advanced now as some other counties but the natural reserved and native ability will some day make Picket county the “Gar’den Spot of Tennessee.” Y.M. AND Y.W.C.A. We note with pleasure the splendid attitude and interest of the student body and especially the rural teachers toward the work of this organization. In reviewing the work for the summer term some of the regular meetings have been omitted due to other activities and programs of the various churches in town. The first meeting held immediately after registration, was carried out with the usual Christian fellowship which is characteristic of Tech students. The program consisted of a welcome address by the president, student council, a discussion of present community needs religiously and the future Y.M. and Y.W.C.A. at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute by Mr. Luther C. Harris. All thoroughly enjoyed the talk. The result of this program was most noticeable by the desire of new students to become acquainted with each other and the great cause of the Y.M. and Y.W.C.A. as well as the cause of T.P.I. to foster education in the Upper Cumberland communities. This cause we believe is nearest to the heart of each and every rural teacher in this school. The “T” Club The “T” Club met and organized at the beginning of the summer school. The membership of this club is composed of those students who are attending summer school and have at some time received a letter. Or letters, from this institution in either baseball, basket ball or football. The following officers were elected: President, Lewis Loftis; Secretary Treasurer, Rose Dow; Reporter, Lora Billingsley. Other members of the club are: Lucy Greenwood, Lydia Wheat, Amy Shipley, Emmett Smartt, Alva Starnes, Albert Johnson. Those receiving letters for basketball are: One letter: Lucy Greenwood, ’24; Lydia Wheat ’24, Rose Dow ’24, Emmett Smartt ’23. Two letters: Lora Billingsley 21, 22, and 23. Baseball, one letter: Emmett Smartt ’28, Albert Johnson, ’24. Football, one lette: Alva Starnes ’24. Three letters: Emmett Smartt ’22, ’23, and 24. THE BARBARIANS Our organization is composed of those students whose counties do not have a number large enough to organize. They call us “the Barbarians,” but we are proud to call ourselves Tennesseans. Our enrollment is as follows: Alfrad Edmonds, Bledsoe; Besise Montgomery, Bledsoe; Bell Heifner, Bradley, Jessie Pair, Bradley; Kathleen Brock, Bradley; Francis Huffman, Bedford; Josh Brown, Clay; Fay Smith, Cumberland; Nina Griffin, Cumberland; Slema McLarty, Cumberland; Miss Nannie Dunbar, Cumberland; Elsie Henderson, Sadie Metcalf, Grundy; Ruby McKeel, Humphreys; Mary Helen Armstrong, Laura Curtis, Lewis; Daisy Leonard, Marshall; Noive Short, Maury; Robley Jobe, Montgomery; Mrs. Mattie E. Cooper, Dixie Alley, () Morgan; Herbert Jeffers, Scott; Irene Paschall, Hattie Terry, Katherine Neal Smith; Ariouine Piarsall, Warren. The following officers were elected: Robley Jobe, President; Irene Pascholl, Secretary; Ruby McKeel, Reporter. TECH ORACLE Published semi-monthly by the student body of the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, Cookeville, Tennessee. KANGAROO COURT NEWS. Geo. C. Bertram The Kangaroo Court has been a decided success during the Summer term. The office of Judge has been occupied by two of the most competent men in the dormitories. Hon. J.D. Cargile of Pickett County and the Hon. W.C. Davis of the good county of Jackson. Mr. Luther Harris of Overton County has held the office of Attorney General for the term, and has discharged the duties of that office in an honest, straight forward way which has been a source of terror for evil doers and at the same time a source of comfort and joy to the honest, peace loving students in the dormitories. Mr. Paul J. Moore of Putnam County has been High Sheriff for this term and has won the admiration of all in discharging his duties in a careful manner which was offensive to none but at the same time, firm and uncompromising with the culprit. The first case to come before the Court was that of Luther C. Harris vs John Bell and Carson Harris for house breaking and attempted of murder. Hon. J.D. Cargile presided. Mr. J.L McDowell represented the defendants. The counsel for the defense entered a plea of of guilty on the grounds of insanity. After a trial which proved that the defendants hit Mr. Harris with a tin cup and various other things while he was in his own room; the Jury disregarded the plea of insanity and returned a verdict of guilty. The Judge then ordered the Sheriff to give each of the men five licks with the straps. The Sheriff executed this order with great enthusiasm. The next case to come before the Court was that of John J. Bell vs Luther Harris for assault and battery and attempt of murder. The regular Judge occupied the bench. The prosecution was represented by W.C. Davis while J.L. McDowell defended. The defendent was found not guilty. The most conspicuous case for this term was that of Mrs. Morton ya A.C. Whitefield charged with larceny. The counsel for both sides put forth their efforts and in the arguments that followed, the audience sat spellbound and listened to perhaps the greatest flow of oratory ever heard in Kangaroo Court. In spite of the almost superhuman efforts put forth by the defense, the Jury returned a verdict of guilty and the defendants got six licks with the straps. The next case that come within the Jurisdiction of this Court was of a civil nature. Mr. Cargile brought suit against Mr. Gid L. Hassler for the collection of a note, the face value of which was ten cents. Before this case came to trial, Mr. Ben Elder used all of his great persuasive power to bring about a peaceful solution of this case but without avail. Hon. W.C. Davis presided over the Court, Mr. John J. Bell represented Mr. Cargile and the defense was represented by McDowell and Upton. After the evidence had been presented the Judge decided to withhold his decision until the next morning. After a night of deep deliberation the Judge handed down the decision that the note was valid and that Mr. Hassler must pay the debt. In deciding this case Mr. Davis also gave the decision that technical points of law could be ignored in Kangaroo Court if it is necessary in order that “right shall prevail.” Court convened June 30th, and tried the following: John Bell vs Luther Harris on charge of pouring water on his bed, the trial resulted in a hung Jury. The following sentences were handed down: Geo. C. Burtram three straps for contempt. C.W. Davis Luther Harris, Jno. Bell, one strap each for contempt. FACULTY CORNER We are glad to give this part of our paper over to our faculty. We wish to thank those who have so generously contributed. Dean Smith says, “The summer School of 1924 is composed of the highest type of manhood and womenhood both from a moral and an intellectual standpoint ever assembeled at the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute and is unsurpassed by any other like gathering in the State. A high class of work has been done from the “word go,” and the faculty is well pleased with the Institution. Mr. McClamahan wishes to make known the fact that the Education Department is full and overflowing. Most of the classes have been divided and some new ones started. There are four teachers for the department this summer. Miss Huffman states that she has a full department in Domestic Arts and all her classes are doing excellent work. Mr. J.M. Hatfield says, “we have the best looking girls the uglest men, and on the whole, the most earnest and hardworking body of students of any summer school ever held.” Miss Voegele makes known the fact that her classes in Domestic Science are doing excellent work. The class in "School Lunch” is serving lunches to the students at cost this summer. Also lunch was served to the visitors of the meeting held by the Parent Teachers Association at this place, Friday June 20. About thirty five guests were present. Both teachers are students enjoyed the work very much. Miss Bryan says she has no special report this time, as her name is always getting mixed up with Charlie Branhams and Charlie is not in school now. So, she does not think it necessary that she make a report. President Smith says this is the best summer school he has ever known and that there is a greater number of men and women who are working towards a definite goal than has ever assembled at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute previous to this year. SHERWOOD LITERARY SOCIETY The Sherwod iLterary Society met to organize for the summer school on Friday afternoon, June 6, 1924. The Officers elected for the ensuing term were John L. McDowell, President; W.G. Whiteaker, Secretary; Luther C. Harris, Treasurer and A.C. Whitefield, Chaplain. The Society opened its work for the summer term with a good percentage of the regular membership present. In addition the Society has been favored at each meeting by the presence of several visitors and members of our generous rival Society, the Upper Cumberlands. Visitors from the rival camp are accorded the same hearty welcome that the Sherwoods extend to all. We have also been especially pleased to have many of the teachers from schools of Putnam and surrounding counties attend our programs. An effort has ben made by the program committee to arrange programs of general interest and that can be duplicated in rural schools. It is hoped that by this means some new ideas of society organization may be carried out by T.P.I. by the visiting teachers. Heretofore neither of the societies has carried on its regular organization during the summer term owing to the small number of members attending the summer school. This year, however, during the Spring term some of the old memebrs who were going to attend summer school, resolved to keep the regular organization going. The result has been encourages and much interest has been aroused. The success of the undertaking was largely made possible by the generous approval and commendation of President Smith and the hearty cooperation of our faculty sponsor, Prof. Chas. McClanahan, of the Department of Education and Psychology. The Society has been strengthened greatly by the addition of several new members, among them being Mr. C.W. Davis, member of the faculty of the Gainesboro High School last year and who plans to enter the Institute Department of T.P.I. in September and Mr. L.O. Upton, who was a member of the Intercollegiate debating team of Burritt, College the past year. Putnam County Putnam county has from the very beginning, contributed more than any other county to make the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute what it is today. It was a small band of loyal citizens of Putnam county who first originated the idea of such a school and began the first for its establishment at this place. It was Putnam county’s representative, the Hon. Elmer L. Wirt, who carried the fight through the legislature in 1925. It was the County Court of Putnam county that donated the Campus and buildings to the State in 1916. From that time till the present Putnam county has contributed a large percentage of the student body. This summer the delegation of teachers of the rural schools of Putnam county attending the summer school is especially fine. Around ninety per cent of the teachers are in attendance. Among the prominent teachers of the county attending are Mrs. J.M. Hatfield Miss Minnie McGlasson and Mr. Lawis Loftis of the Cookeville City School, Mr. Chester Patton and Emmet Smartt of Baxter and Miss Ella Crownover and Miss Nannie Henry, of the Monterey High School, and others. There are also many Putnam county students taking courses for advance credits during the summer term. Several are planning to graduate at the end of the summer school or to qualify for the college entrance requirements. The Putnam county delegation organized for the summer term by electing the following officers: Mr. Lewis Loftis, President; Miss Della Lemons, Sec. Treas.; James P. Buck, reporter; Mr. Morgan Long, Sergeant at arms and Mr. Emmett E. Smartt, Cheer Leader. BELLES LETTRES LITERARY SOCIETY During the spring term of 1924 the Belles Lettres suggested that the societies should meet during the summer session, as in the regular school year. The Belles Lettres had a call meeting the first week of school to elect officers for the summer. The program committee met and planned a program for the first Monday of the term. Much interest was manifested at the first meeting, and it has been steadily growing every since. The society has met every Monday at 3:45. Programs of the highest type have been rendered, which have fully suggested the meaning of the name of the society. Belles Lettres means polite litearture or works of literary art showing grace and imagination, as poetry, drama, fiction and essays; humanities; also, the study and criticism of literature. Much good has been derived from the work done this year under the leadership of our capable president, Mrs. Jewell Johnson. The Society as a whole feels that the Belles Lettres will always continue their meetings during the summer schools. The Belles Lettres who were here last spring have entered wholeheartedly into the work this summer. We were very glad to have the following old members who were not here last year to be with us again during the summer, Misses Gladys Bohannon, Bessie Gentry, Edna Hill, Stella Huddleston, Rnth Irwin, Sarah Martha Tarner, Notie McCormick, Katherine Neal, Hattie Terry, Chloris and Sula Wassom. These people have proven that they enjoy the work and cooperation of the Belles Lettres Literary Society of Tennessee Tech. Although a large per cent of the new summer school students are teachers, and expect to be in school only a short time during he year, some have seen fit to join our band. They are: Mrs. Hattie Roberts, Misses Dixie Alley, Maud Baker, Kittie Lou Fisk, Pauline Gamble, Belle Heifner, Maud Johnson, Mary Ruth Lowry. Gladys McCulley, Jesse Pair, Avo Sells, Elizabeth Tardy and Blanche Tipton. These ladies may not be with us any more until next summer, but we feel sure that they will be glad to come back to T.P.I. knowing that they have a home in a society wehre they have a host of sisters who are proud of them. “This paper says that we are what we eat.” “Then I narrowly escaped being a bad egg this morning.” Doctor: “I have to report, sir, that you are the father of triplets.” Politician: “Impossible! I’ll demand a recount.” Bees don’t whine; they hum while working and how they cooperate! Results, honey. Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves or we know where we can find some one who does. A good book is a good friend particularly if it is a Bank book. “As they took their seats in the box at the theatre, the Dr. asked his wife: “Did you notice that lovely girl in the pretty fur coat waiting in the lobby?” “What,” she replied, “that fussy thing with the false curls rouged face, imitation mink for and soiled gloves? No, I didn’t notice her; why? FENTRESS CLUB We are the smallest organization, having the lucky number of five. We are very weak, but are out to make life as sweet and pleasant as possible, to both ourselves and ones with whom we are associated. Each of us has ideals which can be attained only thru hard work and sacrifice. We chose Eugene Wood, of Boatland, a young man of sterling character and ability, ofr our chairman. He is carrying the limit of four subjects with the Junior Class for the Summer term. Mr. Wood expects to finish high school next year, then try a few years at college. Miss Blanche Tipton, our able and accomplished Reporter, comes from Jamestown. She is only starting on her High School career, but expects to finish after a few years teaching. Miss Annie Lee Boles, one of our Fentress Countians of whom we are very proud, has been attending T.P.I. regularly for the two previous spring and summer terms. She is from Boatland and is a member of the Senior Class. Miss Boles expects to return to T.P.I. next year and take up College work. Mr. Edgar Williams, a noble and sympathetic young man, comes from the much talked of Pall Mall. He was in T.P.I. for the regular term, and carried off the honor as leader of the Sophomore Class. Mr. Williams says he expects to stay with T.P.I. until he gets a degree. Miss Eunice Minor of Wilder is a “top notcher” in the Junior Class. She is almost a stranger in our county, having moved up there last October from Birmingham, Ala., but have learned to love her. Too much good cannot be said of her. Fentress county has some four of five graduates from T.P.I., among whom are Mr. J. Benton Cantrell, Miss Elsie Little and Miss Mable Evans. Mr. Cantrell and Miss Little have been teaching since finishing school. Miss Evans is attending college in Alabama where she expects to take her degree. Fentress county has been behind for a number of years with her roads and schools but we have finally awakened to the fact that good roads and schools are necessary for the development of a county. We now have six High and Junior High Schools well distributed over the county. Where roads permit the consolidation movement is under way and in its youth has proven a great success. Fentress county is also known historically, being the home of the ancestors of Mark Twains and Alvin C. York, the World War hero. Jamestown, our county seat, is the Obedstown spoken of in Mark Twain’s writings. UPPER CUMBERLAND LITERARY SOCIETY The Upper Cumberland Literary Society has continued to grow until now we have over a hundred loyal members. Until the last two years we were handicapped, because we did not have enough members to carry on the work of a strong organization successfully. However, we have constantly kept our motto in mind that “Determination is Success” and now we have one of the best literary societies in school. During the last two years we have been getting our part of new members. A good proof of that is that six of our number, Messrs. Barger, Bracy, Hitwood, Jenkins, Smartt and Taylor graduated from the Institution last year. The Upper Cumberland Society has advanced until the year ’23 and ’24 hs proven to be the most successful year in its history. In the annual debate between the Sherwood and Upper Cumberland’s, we were ably represented by Henry Barger and Benton Carr, and though we lost the decision, we feel that each member was benefited by the splendid example set by these two men; they worked earnestly and denied themselves many pleasures that they might other wise enjoy in order to be loyal to the society. At the next meeting after the debate, we gave them a unanimous standing vote of thanks to show our appreciation for their untiring work. In the Declamation Contest between the two societies, we were represented by Paul Moore and Ban McDearman. Mr. Moore won the metal. One of our members Mr. Noel Rickman won the Athletic medal. The scholarship and Math medals were both won by Mr. Harry Jenkins. And now the dream of all loyal members has come true. One has to look in the auditorium to see the gold and black proudly floating on both Wilson Banners. We are not over confident because we were victorious, for we realize that a good society lost. We expect to put forth greater efforts next year than ever before. The Upper Cumberlands have organized for the summer term, and under the leadership of John Bell, some interesting programs are being given. We are very glad indeed to welcome Summer School students to our meetings. We especially invite all to come back next fall and become a member of one of these splendid Societies. The Upper Cumberland’s and Pollaclians extend a hearty welcome to any one desiring to do some real literary work. WHITE COUNTY CLUB The White county Club was duly organized at the beginning of summer school. The club consists of twenty one members. Maude Baker, Janie Borden, John Bell, Mary Bryan, Pearl Brown, Anna Elrod, Ruth Erwin, Paulme Gambol, Kittie Lou Fisk, Verla Hennessee, Clara Hudgens, Mrs. William Hutson, Chas. B. Johnson, Mary Ruth Lowery, Jewell Lee, Elizabeth Lee, J.L. McDowell, Bessie Snodgrass, James Snodgrass, Pasco Tollison, Anna Mae Williams. The following officers were elected: James Snodgrass, Pres.; Ruth Erwin, Vice Pres.; Elizabeth Lee, Sec. Treas. And reporter; John Bell, Yell Leader, Charles Johnson, Sergt. At arms; Mr. Thomas L. Passon, Sponsor You see that White county is represented by old maids, flappers, marired men and bachelors. We are indeed proud that we have such a great number all teachers, most of whom are graduates of White county High School and are taking advanced work. Quite a few are here to specialize in one of the four departments. The Wite county delegation as a whole is proving itself an asset rather than a liability. This is made possible by the fact that some of its representatives appear to be living up on love thus counterbalancing the loss which would naturally follow the activity of a few members whose function is principally the consumption of food. The names are withheld to secure the safety of the editor. White county shines where-ever she may be. With brains of more abundance than leaves on the trees. Of our looks its needless to say, This you will notice if you’ll only look our way; White county can never be beat, For we have made many take their seat. If you don’t believe us we are ready for trying, And very soon you’ll feel yourself dying. We came here with a very high opinion of this own and school and we can truthfully say that our opinion has not been lowered in the least but that we have higher aspirations than ever ebfore. We very much appreciate the kindness shown us by the splendid faculty, the matron of the girls dormitory and the student body. We feel that Tennessee Polytechnic Institute is a great institution for education. We feel that we are more capable of rendering the service of which rural communities are in need because of our attendance here. We wish our many acquaintances here to feel that they have a hearty welcome to our county. JACKSON COUNTY We have a large number of summer school students in the Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. Jackson county students met for organization immediately following the beginning of the term. The following officers were elected: C.W. Davis President; A.C. Whitefield, Vice President; Ethel Anderson, Secretary and Reporter; Alice Elizabeth Tardy, Assistant Reporter. Our delegation consists of twenty-six students, ranking next in number to Putnam county. That we excel in quality of course goes without saying. The following is our enrollment; Ina Allen, Ethel Anderson, Mabel Cassity, Alberta Cassity, C.W. Davis, Lillie Fox, Zora Fox, Loraine Fox, Lottie Harley, Lillie Harley, Rubin McCoin, Iva McCoin Ruby Montgomery, Ruth Quaries, Hallie Reeves, Christine Settle, Annie Sadler, Alice Elizabeth Tardy, Sallie Van Hooser, Nannie Van Hooser, Sella Wassom, Chloris Wassom, Ethel Wheeler. A.C. Whitefield, Cora Welt, Otha Smith. About fifty per cent of the Jackson students are taking college work. The teachers of our county are awakening to a realization of the necessity of a higher education and are striving day by day to obtain wisdom. Our chief interest is centered in the rural schools, because Jackson county future depends upon the efficiency of these schools. Jackson county is blessed with a large number of teachers. Many of them are individually possessed of considerable avoirdupois among whom are to be found Wilson Davis, Christine Settle and Otha Smith. Overton County Overton county representatives are to be found everywhere. They are capable of occupying any position from the governor’s chair to the nt oycunyt county jails. Twenty-five Overton countians are here in summer school. Practically all of them are planning to go back into the rural schools in the mountains. We are very proud of these teachers. It is to teachers of this type that we look for leadership. We are looking forward to the day when the progressive program which is being fostered by the teachers Asosciation. The worthy Superintendent and board will make it possible to reward these deserving teachers. Another thing for which they are to be commended is the fact that every one belongs to the Overton County Teacher’s Association. This record is probably unequaled by any other delegation. The members of the delegation are as follows: Velma Murphy, Chairman; Overton Upton, Secretary and Treasurer; Luther C. Harris, Reporter; Uldine Zachry, Velta Bowers, Challis Bowers, Maggie Green, Carson Harris, Charlie Hawkins, Rosa Reynolds, Josie Howard, Julia Rogers, Etta Ryann, Elils Webb, Ellis Breeding, Verna Huddleston, Martha Carmack Ava Sells, Hattie Roberts, Delta Hawkins, Claudie Lea, Beulah Milligan, Pearl Bowman, Helen Stonecipher. RECREATION HOUR A great addition to the social life in the dormetories is the recreation hour which is held on the campus after the evening mail. Miss Jobe, the instructor of Physical Education, directs the evening’s amusement which is entered into with much enthusiasm.

1924 July 7

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